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switching back to goalie

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Old
04-20-2008, 04:27 PM
  #26
Terror91
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No I dont own an agility ladder. instruction to make one would be nice. im a student. what do you mean situations to aid my training?

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04-20-2008, 04:49 PM
  #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar Stahl 30 View Post
if you get good you can angle the puck to a teammate or in the corner
How you direct the puck into the corner is by rolling your wrist in the direction of the corner. This will help direct the puck into the corner.

As for your stand up. Look at the coaching tip on how to do skate saves. I like skate saves better than butterflies because I can control the direction of the puck better into the corner instead of out from.

Now, there are a lot of goalies out there that can control the puck into the corner with a butterfly. However, as a new goalie and a stand up one at that, skates saves would probably work better for you.

The more different type of saves you can do or have in your save arsenal, the better goalie you are going to be.

Here is a list:
1. Skate saves.
2. Butterfly saves.
3. Catching Glove saves.
4. Half butterfly saves. (Right and Left)
5. Blocker Saves.
6. Trapping Saves. (Glove on blocker to control rebound)
7. Two Legged Pad Slide (Stacked Pads)
8. Stick save.
9. Poke Check.
10. T-Glide Save.
11. T-Glide Push.
12. Side Step Shuffle.
13. Screen Shot Saves.
14. Wrap-a-round Saves.
15. Break-a-ways Saves.
16. Penalty Shot saves.

I am sure others will add more. But this is a good start. If you need help with any of these, just ask.

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04-20-2008, 04:54 PM
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stemps View Post
No I dont own an agility ladder. instruction to make one would be nice. im a student. what do you mean situations to aid my training?

If you want, I have an program for Isometric leg work what will help you out. It's a program that I use for my Euro Hockey Camp. A Russian coach taught it to me and I use it with all my kids. However, to be honest, I give it free to all my members who sign up on my web site. Sorry this is not a promote Head coach web site. Send me an email and I will send it to you in a attachment. That is if it will send. It's all in video.

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04-20-2008, 06:45 PM
  #29
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Here are the instructions courtesy "Moogy" , Team USA Womens World Champions; 2000 was the year, I think....

1/2" DIA. PVC pipe : Consider each rung width about 4" more than your foot length.
and the number of rungs you wish to have. Each rung will be adjustable as far as box size. This facilitates different pattern concepts.

1/4" braided nylon rope : Consider the total number of feet you will need to complete the "cuircut" of the ladder. Just considering a length of 8 feet....16feet for sides. Wanting rung ever 12" , 9 rungs at 16" is another 24 feet. You will also need 12 feet of the PVC pipe. given these measures. always a good idea to get an extra foot or so. You may also damage the PVC rungs unless you go with a heavy grade PVC. You may want to have a short section left over for repairs.









For outdoor use add 8 tent stakes for each corner and sides. The one thing I notice about this ladder is that it just doesnt look right with out the classic "duct tape". You can also make the "four square" box in this fashion. I like that they dont allow you to cheat. Unlike flat ladders, these let you know when you miss. On that flip side, you can also fall... In turn it encourages the user to shoot for precision in the step rather than speed. Correct over fast....only go as fast as you can correctly execute.

As for the others...your a student, any long flights of stairs in your daily routine. If not COULD there be? Steps present a very benefitial routine. Even those such as a curb. Walking normal, you will normally confront a first step with your "master" leg. By alternating the foot you use for that first step, you are working on your goalie skills. You can also adjust taking two stairs with your "passive" leg to one for the "master". Thats just one example. Doing desk work? take a minute or so from time to time to focus your eyes repeatedly between something with in arms reach(or closer) and something a few feet away. No head turn needed. Increase the distance betwen your focal objects for added benefit....that one might get you some strange looks if caught doing in public but your working on your goalie skills.


Last edited by MikeD: 04-20-2008 at 06:56 PM.
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Old
04-20-2008, 09:34 PM
  #30
Terror91
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeD View Post
Here are the instructions courtesy "Moogy" , Team USA Womens World Champions; 2000 was the year, I think....

1/2" DIA. PVC pipe : Consider each rung width about 4" more than your foot length.
and the number of rungs you wish to have. Each rung will be adjustable as far as box size. This facilitates different pattern concepts.

1/4" braided nylon rope : Consider the total number of feet you will need to complete the "cuircut" of the ladder. Just considering a length of 8 feet....16feet for sides. Wanting rung ever 12" , 9 rungs at 16" is another 24 feet. You will also need 12 feet of the PVC pipe. given these measures. always a good idea to get an extra foot or so. You may also damage the PVC rungs unless you go with a heavy grade PVC. You may want to have a short section left over for repairs.









For outdoor use add 8 tent stakes for each corner and sides. The one thing I notice about this ladder is that it just doesnt look right with out the classic "duct tape". You can also make the "four square" box in this fashion. I like that they dont allow you to cheat. Unlike flat ladders, these let you know when you miss. On that flip side, you can also fall... In turn it encourages the user to shoot for precision in the step rather than speed. Correct over fast....only go as fast as you can correctly execute.

As for the others...your a student, any long flights of stairs in your daily routine. If not COULD there be? Steps present a very benefitial routine. Even those such as a curb. Walking normal, you will normally confront a first step with your "master" leg. By alternating the foot you use for that first step, you are working on your goalie skills. You can also adjust taking two stairs with your "passive" leg to one for the "master". Thats just one example. Doing desk work? take a minute or so from time to time to focus your eyes repeatedly between something with in arms reach(or closer) and something a few feet away. No head turn needed. Increase the distance betwen your focal objects for added benefit....that one might get you some strange looks if caught doing in public but your working on your goalie skills.


Thank you very much! I have quite a bit of PVC pipe around my house. I can get rope pretty easily. I'm trying to get what your telling me. Try to focus on two things, one close, one farther away?

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04-21-2008, 11:52 AM
  #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeD View Post

As for the others...your a student, any long flights of stairs in your daily routine. If not COULD there be? Steps present a very benefitial routine. Even those such as a curb. Walking normal, you will normally confront a first step with your "master" leg. By alternating the foot you use for that first step, you are working on your goalie skills. You can also adjust taking two stairs with your "passive" leg to one for the "master". Thats just one example. Doing desk work? take a minute or so from time to time to focus your eyes repeatedly between something with in arms reach(or closer) and something a few feet away. No head turn needed. Increase the distance betwen your focal objects for added benefit....that one might get you some strange looks if caught doing in public but your working on your goalie skills.
Wow, MikeD good stuff. If I can add. Running works as well. But, run sideways so that you are actually crossing over shoe over shoe. And if you can do this both ways running up a hill...the better. I lived in Hawaii for two years and that's all I did. Stayed in great shape...mind you i was 26 at the time now I'm 50. but the concept still works today.

MikeD, I think I will build a couple of these for my rink. Thanks for sharing!


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Last edited by Headcoach: 04-21-2008 at 12:07 PM.
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Old
04-21-2008, 06:42 PM
  #32
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The Images and materials are Casandra's. Its something left over from my "Civil Goalie" days. I like the design because it allows you to adjust the rungs. When working with a wide range of age groups, it does help greatly.

Stemps,
Just one object at a time......

What I am getting at with the focus and objects is DYNAMIC VISUAL ACUITY. Hold a pencil up at arms length, eraser up towards the cieling, point to the floor. Focus your eyes and concentration on the eraser. This seems easy enough....lets make it a bit harder. Position yourself so that while holding that pencil, off to your left is a video screen, playing something that interests you. Focus your eyes and concentration on that eraser.
It can be very difficult for many to be able to NOT switch their gaze to the screen. This happens in hockey. The fan standing up at the glass, kids tossing a ball around rink side...etc etc. For a fraction of a second, your mind is taking in the info from these "distractions". Instead of having 100% of your CPU on the task at hand, your slightly distracted. That split second can make or break a save. Try to achieve one minute with out altering your 100% concentration.
Now, with pencil in hand select another object about 20 feet away. Hold your pencil so that your second object is just slightly off line. Expanding on the dynamic visual acuity, again using the pencil eraser, begin with your eyes focused on this close object. Once you have clear visual focus, switch your gaze to the distant object. Note that there is a small time frame where the eyes adjust to bring that object into focus. Once you have "locked", switch your gase back to the close object. Repeat the process for as long as you wish. Increase the distance of the further onject..etc etc. You will find this time frame become reduced. You can also do this with flash cards....etc etc.

The point I try to make is that you dont have to have ice to be working on your ON ICE skills. There are many activities, aside from physical conditioning, that will bring rapid improvement to your game skills and be done as you go about your daily routine. You just have to think outside the box to recognize and take advantage. I have heard Coaches state that the stick is the goalies number one tool, others say the gloves.....I say its your BRAIN!(duh, no shock there) A brand new computer stuck on a DIAL UP connection......thats what a physically conditioned goalie who ignores the mental aspect of the training is like. There is huge potential but its unsupported. With dynamic visual acuity your slowly increasing your mental bandwidth and speed.

As for the ladder drills: I have one example video that I am trying to locate and upload to my server. The vid is Jukka Ropponen's Eldest son working on a ladder drill. I hope the audio comes through...his foot falls have the distinct sound of an old steam locomotive barrelling down the tracks. lol I will add the link when I get it in....

Cant locate the clip I am looking for but i did find another from Dryland training back in 2003. Sorry for the poor quality. Its going to run like an old home movie! lol The young man in the orange-ish T is one of Jukka's sons. Watching the students footwork you can see the difference. 35 megs so hope your broadband.

http://www.hawksice.com/tending/dryland2003.mpg


Last edited by MikeD: 04-21-2008 at 07:55 PM.
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Old
04-21-2008, 09:21 PM
  #33
Terror91
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeD View Post
The Images and materials are Casandra's. Its something left over from my "Civil Goalie" days. I like the design because it allows you to adjust the rungs. When working with a wide range of age groups, it does help greatly.

Stemps,
Just one object at a time......

What I am getting at with the focus and objects is DYNAMIC VISUAL ACUITY. Hold a pencil up at arms length, eraser up towards the cieling, point to the floor. Focus your eyes and concentration on the eraser. This seems easy enough....lets make it a bit harder. Position yourself so that while holding that pencil, off to your left is a video screen, playing something that interests you. Focus your eyes and concentration on that eraser.
It can be very difficult for many to be able to NOT switch their gaze to the screen. This happens in hockey. The fan standing up at the glass, kids tossing a ball around rink side...etc etc. For a fraction of a second, your mind is taking in the info from these "distractions". Instead of having 100% of your CPU on the task at hand, your slightly distracted. That split second can make or break a save. Try to achieve one minute with out altering your 100% concentration.
Now, with pencil in hand select another object about 20 feet away. Hold your pencil so that your second object is just slightly off line. Expanding on the dynamic visual acuity, again using the pencil eraser, begin with your eyes focused on this close object. Once you have clear visual focus, switch your gaze to the distant object. Note that there is a small time frame where the eyes adjust to bring that object into focus. Once you have "locked", switch your gase back to the close object. Repeat the process for as long as you wish. Increase the distance of the further onject..etc etc. You will find this time frame become reduced. You can also do this with flash cards....etc etc.

The point I try to make is that you dont have to have ice to be working on your ON ICE skills. There are many activities, aside from physical conditioning, that will bring rapid improvement to your game skills and be done as you go about your daily routine. You just have to think outside the box to recognize and take advantage. I have heard Coaches state that the stick is the goalies number one tool, others say the gloves.....I say its your BRAIN!(duh, no shock there) A brand new computer stuck on a DIAL UP connection......thats what a physically conditioned goalie who ignores the mental aspect of the training is like. There is huge potential but its unsupported. With dynamic visual acuity your slowly increasing your mental bandwidth and speed.

As for the ladder drills: I have one example video that I am trying to locate and upload to my server. The vid is Jukka Ropponen's Eldest son working on a ladder drill. I hope the audio comes through...his foot falls have the distinct sound of an old steam locomotive barrelling down the tracks. lol I will add the link when I get it in....

Cant locate the clip I am looking for but i did find another from Dryland training back in 2003. Sorry for the poor quality. Its going to run like an old home movie! lol The young man in the orange-ish T is one of Jukka's sons. Watching the students footwork you can see the difference. 35 megs so hope your broadband.

http://www.hawksice.com/tending/dryland2003.mpg
I never thought of that but now that I am, its a great idea. if I can stay focused of the object without the distractions, and get my positioning down. my ability to stop the puck should increase by a mile.

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