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Some Help on the Off-Season

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Old
05-06-2008, 07:28 AM
  #1
WithOutPaperss
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Some Help on the Off-Season

Next year I will be playing against 16, 17, and 18 year olds, and I am 15. Many of these people will be like 6 feet, while I am 5 foot 4. Besides hoping I grow, what is the best way to get stronger this off-season? What muscles are the most important for me to build? What exercises are the best to build those important mucles?

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Old
05-06-2008, 11:46 AM
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Squats, Deadlifts, and Benchpresses


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05-06-2008, 02:51 PM
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Kamus
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Bill Starr's 5X5

http://www.eclipsegym.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=57

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Old
05-06-2008, 05:28 PM
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WithOutPaperss
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I guess I should add I am 118 pounds also.

5'4 118 lbs.

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05-07-2008, 06:28 PM
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MikeD
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Male, Female??

Your diet is going to be key in making gains.....

Here are two year round fitness programs for download. One is for Midget Age and the other Collegiate /Pro level. Both provide a pretty solid set of weekly micro-cycles for the off season. You can compare the two in how they differ based on age/physical maturity. It is probably better for you consider how to get well rounded development over being to target specific.

You would know yourself best to be able to single out any specific targets that are weaker and make them a priority. Also, based on your physical attributes there are limitations to what is "cost effective" for your game. With smaller statured players, speed and agility in skating/puck skills can offset where size is lacking. You cant hit what you cant catch...

http://www.hawksice.com/tending/fitness16_17yrs.zip
http://www.hawksice.com/tending/pro_...te_program.zip

Lastly, here is an interesting article about off season guidelines but based on goaltender physiology. I would venture to guess that it would be just as appropriate for any other hockey player.

http://www.hawksice.com/tending/Off_..._Guidlines.pdf


Last edited by MikeD: 05-07-2008 at 06:44 PM.
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05-08-2008, 12:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dangelo37 View Post
Next year I will be playing against 16, 17, and 18 year olds, and I am 15. Many of these people will be like 6 feet, while I am 5 foot 4. Besides hoping I grow, what is the best way to get stronger this off-season? What muscles are the most important for me to build? What exercises are the best to build those important mucles?
I recommend some isometric leg work...

Drill#1: (Basic position for each drill)
Place your feet, one foot apart and then get into the sitting position with your bottom touching the back of your heels. What it going to look like is a down hill skier, but in the sitting position. Make sure that your knees are apart and your hand together with your arms in between your knees. This is called the set position!

Now, for Drill #1: You want to jump forward about three feet and land back into the set position. Do this about 15 to 20 feet.

Drill #2: Same thing...but backwards.

Drill #3: Set position. Three Jumps forward, turn clock wise in the air to backwards and back down in the set position. Three jumps backwards, turn clock wise in the air to forward, back down in the set position. 15 to 20 down the runway.

Drill #4: Same as 3, but single it up! One foreward, one backwards, all the way down to the 20 ft mark.

Drill #5: Set position on the right side of you 20 ft runway. Jump with both feet, 1 ft. foward and to the left by three ft. back down into the set position. Then, jump back to the right, 1 ft. forward and to the right by 3 ft, all the way down the 20 ft runway. So what you are looking like is just jumping from side to side down the runway. Oh by the way. Remembers to land in the set position each time...don't cheat!

Drill #6: Same as drill #5, but backwards!

Drill #7: Same as drill #5, but with one leg to the left and one leg to the right. I call this the "Russian Step" but with no russian box. Just side to side down the runway. Ah but there's a catch, when you jump from side to side, you have to sit down on that back leg and don't let it touch the ground. Oh, and watch your balance. Don't use your hand for balance!

Drill #8: Yep, you are right! Same as drill #7 but backward!

Drill #9: Set position, jump forward by a couple of feet, 360 in the air, land back in the set position.

Drill # 10: Set position. Standing up! Then, down into the sitting position and back up halfway, hold for one second and back down into the sitting position. Do 10 reps of 5 sets to start off with and them increase a set each week to 10 sets.
Yep, you are right, there's a catch again! When you are standing up, place your tennis shoes on their side. Like you are skating on the out side edge on both skates. make sure that your tennis shoes stay like that when you go down into the sitted position.

Do this three times a week, Monday, Wednesday & Friday during the summer.

Now, here is where I tell my whining students to suck it up! When you do these drills you are going to run into a mental brick wall. This is the point in which you will NOT want to do these drills because you will think that they are stupid! You will call them everything in the book so you will not have to do them.

But here's what I have to say to that....

The difference between an amateur and a pro is that the amateur says...I can't do it, and the pro says, now far do you want me to jump.

If you do these simple drills, I will promiss you will be faster and have better balance on the ice.

Oh, by the way. This is part of my Euro Hockey class that I put on each week at my rink and I have a bunch of 6 year olds doing these dry land training drills. If they can do it...you can too!

Good luck!
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Old
05-08-2008, 07:22 PM
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MikeD
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Those drills can easily be plugged into the micro-cycles for the O2 requirements also. The shorter and longer variety time frame of your drills hit all of the 3 major energy production systems and their sublevels of the body very well. A, AA, lactic and Alactic....

What kind of rest interval would you suggest for between sets/repetitions of those drills having them? Also, have you guys done any heart-rate monitoring for dryland/game demand comparisons? A few years back this was done for goalies training with Espoo hockey(finland) and Severla other teams in hte Swiss Elite Leagues.. Monitoring in game was used to compile the data which was then used to tailor the fine details and monitor the work levels of each individual. This also helped the participants KNOW that they are hitting performance levels needed to get the most benefit for their time.

One of the things i have noticed with the heart-rate monitoring for dry land work, the athletes mind can be occupied with tracking the rate during the work-out/drill. Being focused on reaching and maintaining tarfet rates seems to reduce the "self-motivation" needed for some who struggled in past lengthy drills.

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05-08-2008, 08:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeD View Post
What kind of rest interval would you suggest for between sets/repetitions of those drills having them?
Well, that's a good question. Normally, I start off with a whole team, 17 guys in one line. When the first guy gets about half way, the next guy goes. It takes roughly about two to three minutes for the whole team (depending on what shape the team is in) to move down the runway. Then, we do the same drill coming back. After they all come back, then we start the next drill.


Quote:
Also, have you guys done any heart-rate monitoring for dryland/game demand comparisons?
Nope, but maybe this would be a good idea. What do you suggest?

Quote:
A few years back this was done for goalies training with Espoo hockey(finland) and Several other teams in the Swiss Elite Leagues.. Monitoring in game was used to compile the data which was then used to tailor the fine details and monitor the work levels of each individual. This also helped the participants KNOW that they are hitting performance levels needed to get the most benefit for their time.
Do you know what they used to compile the data?

Quote:
One of the things i have noticed with the heart-rate monitoring for dry land work, the athletes mind can be occupied with tracking the rate during the work-out/drill. Being focused on reaching and maintaining target rate seems to reduce the "self-motivation" needed for some who struggled in past lengthy drills.
So inorder to montior all of the data, a heart rate monitor is the best tool to use? I'm not sure our rink can afford this type of equipment. Although, it would be nice to know how things work out. Would a cheap heart monitor that kids can buy at the local sports store (Dick's...etc.) will it work for this application?

Thanks for the advice in advance.
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Old
05-09-2008, 04:52 AM
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dangelo37 View Post
Next year I will be playing against 16, 17, and 18 year olds, and I am 15. Many of these people will be like 6 feet, while I am 5 foot 4. Besides hoping I grow, what is the best way to get stronger this off-season? What muscles are the most important for me to build? What exercises are the best to build those important mucles?
For hockey your core (abdominals) and quads (legs) are crucial. Focus on them not so much to improve your speed, but to be a stronger skater the way Crosby is.

Since you'll be with guys bigger than you, better build up your upper body strength as well. Focus on Deltoids to give you stronger shoulders. Arms, don't focus on too much because you don't want to lose flexibility, but hit your pectorials (chest) as well.

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05-09-2008, 07:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Creedence View Post
Focus on them not so much to improve your speed,
This is great advise, if you want the kid to remain in youth hockey and then move on to the beer league! With all due respect, the majority of the post is very excellent.

It's just that in my experience, you never want to tell a player not to work on his speed. You see, I scout for a Junior team and that's the first thing I look for!

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05-09-2008, 11:36 AM
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Make sure your neck is strong...it's what makes sure your head is up.

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Old
05-09-2008, 12:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Headcoach View Post
This is great advise, if you want the kid to remain in youth hockey and then move on to the beer league! With all due respect, the majority of the post is very excellent.

It's just that in my experience, you never want to tell a player not to work on his speed. You see, I scout for a Junior team and that's the first thing I look for!

Head coach
Yea, but you can disect 5 words of any post and find fault with them. I think you know what I meant. When you move into more competitive hockey with people bigger than you, where there's less room on the ice to accelerate and gain speed, being a stronger skater becomes more important than being a fast skater.

And upon further inspection, I notice that I never told him not to work on speed.

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05-09-2008, 03:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Creedence View Post
Yea, but you can disect 5 words of any post and find fault with them. I think you know what I meant. When you move into more competitive hockey with people bigger than you, where there's less room on the ice to accelerate and gain speed, being a stronger skater becomes more important than being a fast skater.

And upon further inspection, I notice that I never told him not to work on speed.
Fair enough!

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05-09-2008, 03:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dangelo37 View Post
Next year I will be playing against 16, 17, and 18 year olds, and I am 15. Many of these people will be like 6 feet, while I am 5 foot 4. Besides hoping I grow, what is the best way to get stronger this off-season? What muscles are the most important for me to build? What exercises are the best to build those important mucles?
Im only 5'5 and going to be doing the same thing next season (playing with 16-18 year olds).

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05-10-2008, 09:12 PM
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there are many low cost heart rate monitors. There are several good products in the 30.00-50 dollar range. The system used By Espoo was quite extensive. monitors were placed in the CA and Mask with the data sent wireless to the computers. The system being very expensive, its not an option for most.

There are several models available built like wrist watches. One sends a signal wireless to an ear piece verbally telling you the current heart rate. This can easily be used having the player wear the monitor and the coach using the ear piece to track. That model sells in walmart for around 35-40 dollars.

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05-10-2008, 09:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeD View Post
there are many low cost heart rate monitors. There are several good products in the 30.00-50 dollar range. The system used By Espoo was quite extensive. monitors were placed in the CA and Mask with the data sent wireless to the computers. The system being very expensive, its not an option for most.

There are several models available built like wrist watches. One sends a signal wireless to an ear piece verbally telling you the current heart rate. This can easily be used having the player wear the monitor and the coach using the ear piece to track. That model sells in walmart for around 35-40 dollars.
Ok. I'll go check it out.

Thanks
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Old
05-11-2008, 05:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Headcoach View Post
I recommend some isometric leg work...

Drill#1: (Basic position for each drill)
Place your feet, one foot apart and then get into the sitting position with your bottom touching the back of your heels. What it going to look like is a down hill skier, but in the sitting position. Make sure that your knees are apart and your hand together with your arms in between your knees. This is called the set position!
is this pretty close to a Hindu squat? I've been doing them and they've made me a helluva lot more confident about more first step.

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05-11-2008, 08:25 AM
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WithOutPaperss
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Thanks for all the help everyone.

I'll probably start doing those drills Head Coach, I'm willing to try anything so that I can get faster, and better at hockey.

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05-12-2008, 05:16 PM
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Another thing that you could look into is doing some Yoga. I know it doesn't
sound real macho, but my flexibility and core strength took off.

Also...

Look into a product called P90X. It's an exercise program that I did...or tried to do...it kicked my butt. It's like 100 bucks for a bunch of DVD's but man, is the workout INTENSE. It won't build "hockey specific" muscles, but your entire
body will transform, quickly. The catch is, it's about 70-90 minutes a day of
training, and it's a buster. If you have the time to dedicate, you will see the
difference.

Good luck...and remember, you're still growing...you'll get there.

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Old
05-12-2008, 06:59 PM
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Use caution in regards to some of the programs out there. P90x is interesting in itself but some of the other strength training out there can actually slow you down. P90X seems to be one of the few that might suit the hockey player very well and doesnt require a huge amount of investemnt other than time and the program itself.

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05-12-2008, 10:13 PM
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Hate to say it but at the midget level you would be squashed like a fly at 5'4'' 118 ibs. Are you looking to play rep? From what I gathered the average size for AAA midget is not far off Junior hockey

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05-13-2008, 06:22 PM
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You can say it but there is a possibility that you are incorrect. We have guys like Martin St. Louis who is listed at 5'9" but I think thats when he is ON skates. Nathan Gerbe is 5' 6" and has excelled.

I have seen some small palyers do VERY well and I have seen some 6' plus youths who play very poorly. Size, regardless of the level of play is not a direct indicator. Again, a fast and heads up player will do well because the big dumb slow brutes cant hit what they cant catch. I have also seen some pretty small kids LEVEL much larger and have pics to prove it. One of the boys on my sons team last year, Popiela, would make it a game to go after the biggest on every team they faced. A good 60% of the time he achieved his goal. HE might have only been 51 or 5'2" but he played like he was 6'+. ITs in the heart NOT the yardstick.

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05-14-2008, 03:26 PM
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Quote:
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You can say it but there is a possibility that you are incorrect. We have guys like Martin St. Louis who is listed at 5'9" but I think thats when he is ON skates. Nathan Gerbe is 5' 6" and has excelled.

I have seen some small palyers do VERY well and I have seen some 6' plus youths who play very poorly. Size, regardless of the level of play is not a direct indicator. Again, a fast and heads up player will do well because the big dumb slow brutes cant hit what they cant catch. I have also seen some pretty small kids LEVEL much larger and have pics to prove it. One of the boys on my sons team last year, Popiela, would make it a game to go after the biggest on every team they faced. A good 60% of the time he achieved his goal. HE might have only been 51 or 5'2" but he played like he was 6'+. ITs in the heart NOT the yardstick.
There is the rare case in the NHL but those guys are needles in the haystack. And St.Louis is a stocky guy anyways at at least 175 pounds and he isnt 5'9'' on skates, he is about 5'8'' barefoot he has said that much. My advice to Dangelo would be to start lifting free weights, eat a lot of healthy, protein rich foods and see where it takes you at tryouts.

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