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Who was the toughest player in Habs history?

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Old
05-07-2008, 09:57 PM
  #51
Ice Poutine
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Originally Posted by Teufelsdreck View Post
The Rocket was tough and fought furiously. However, he was by no means the best in his day.

Once he lost a fight with Gordy Howe. On his way to the penalty box, Ted Lindsay said in a mocking way, "How'd it feel?" Richard proceeded to beat up Lindsay.
I've seen Ferguson, Nilan and Robinson play and i can tell you one thing: no one was as feared or respected as Robinson was. He could check you cleanly and take you to the hospital or he could knock you out with a punch. He owned the ice, wherever he was playing!

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05-07-2008, 10:06 PM
  #52
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Originally Posted by Carbo N8 View Post
Are you thinking of Cam Connor?

I agree with you, Kordic was a better fighter than Nilan, imo & I'm glad you mentioned Roberge, he could really throw them.
They had a guy named Connolly, I think one of our posters goes by him for his user name. He was only around a year or two, won a bunch of fights, but couldn't play much. He might've had some back problems. I'm typing this and I'm wondering if it was Carlson instead of Connolly. Obsessive as I am, I'll find it somewhere and correct myself.

Kent Carlson was the guy. One of those American guys that seemed to appear every year during the early 80's. Tough kid.


Last edited by mcphee: 05-07-2008 at 10:11 PM. Reason: memory lapse
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05-07-2008, 10:07 PM
  #53
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Originally Posted by Ice Poutine View Post
I've seen Ferguson, Nilan and Robinson play and i can tell you one thing: no one was as feared or respected as Robinson was. He could check you cleanly and take you to the hospital or he could knock you out with a punch. He owned the ice, wherever he was playing!
That's a good way of describing Robinson, he was such a presence on the ice and could beat you so many ways.

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05-07-2008, 10:08 PM
  #54
Canadiens1958
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Larry Robinson

Never saw Larry Robinson lose a fight.

Simon Nolet of the Flyers did a number on John Ferguson by keeping him away and punching. Ferguson was quick and he had a street fighters instincts of getting the first punch or punches in, he also had a knack for recognizing the opponents weak side.

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05-07-2008, 10:11 PM
  #55
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Pull up the Stan Jonathon Bouchard fight. It wasnt pretty. Larry destroyed Dave Shultz.
Don't generalize Bouchard's ability to throw the fists based on just one fight and one possibly lucky punch (especially if you're not old enough to have followed his career). Even Jonathon admits he was sh##ting bricks when they hooked on to each other. Bouchard was one of the most feared fighters of his era and didn't have to fight much because he was so feared....he was huge and knew what to do with the dukes. He rarely ever lost a fight.

Bouchard also destroyed Schultz on more than one occasion.

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05-07-2008, 10:14 PM
  #56
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Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 View Post
Never saw Larry Robinson lose a fight.

Simon Nolet of the Flyers did a number on John Ferguson by keeping him away and punching. Ferguson was quick and he had a street fighters instincts of getting the first punch or punches in, he also had a knack for recognizing the opponents weak side.
Don't know if you read The Game, Dryden was always concerned about Robisnon fighting. His thinking was that LR was such a presence, like Ice P. described, that fighting and losing a fight would shatter the mystique.

It finally happened, I think it was a little pesky guy with the Rangers named Butler, who must have landed a few clean shots as Larry was cut. Dryden was afraid that Robinson wouldn't command the same respect, but nothing changed.

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05-07-2008, 10:16 PM
  #57
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Originally Posted by Schooner Guy View Post
Don't generalize Bouchard's ability to throw the fists based on just one fight and one possibly lucky punch (especially if you're not old enough to have followed his career). Even Jonathon admits he was sh##ting bricks when they hooked on to each other. Bouchard was one of the most feared fighters of his era and didn't have to fight much because he was so feared....he was huge and knew what to do with the dukes. He rarely ever lost a fight.

Bouchard also destroyed Schultz on more than one occasion.
True, Butch was tough, and he tends to be forgotten because of that fight. His heart was never in it though, nice guy who didn't really like to pound people.

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05-07-2008, 10:17 PM
  #58
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Bad to the Bone,,,,,,


Fighter,,,,,,Nilan
Defense,,,,,,,,Robinson
Offense,,,,,,,,Rocket
Goaler,,,,,,Roy
Coach,,,,,,,,,Bowman
Manager,,,,,,,,,Sammy
Captain,,,,,,,,Belliveau
Analyst,,,,,,,Gallivan
Cups,,,,,,,,,,24 and counting.

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Old
05-07-2008, 10:30 PM
  #59
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True, Butch was tough, and he tends to be forgotten because of that fight. His heart was never in it though, nice guy who didn't really like to pound people.
I met Pierre at La Cage Aux Sports before a Habs-Bruins game this past Easter weekend. What a very nice man! I was with my wife and he was with his wife sitting along the bar beside us. I asked if I get a picture with him and he said "no problem". Afterwards, I planned to leave him alone because he was with his wife but it was Butch who kept initiating further conversation.

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05-07-2008, 10:33 PM
  #60
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Originally Posted by Schooner Guy View Post
I met Pierre at La Cage Aux Sports before a Habs-Bruins game this past Easter weekend. What a very nice man! I was with my wife and he was with his wife sitting along the bar beside us. I asked if I get a picture with him and he said "no problem". Afterwards, I planned to leave him alone because he was with his wife but it was Butch who kept initiating further conversation.
When my Dad talks about people he really admired or thought highly of in hockey, Emile,Butch Sr. is near the top of the list. Quite a hockey family.

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05-07-2008, 10:33 PM
  #61
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My favorites were Lyle Odelein and Gino Odjick!

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Old
05-07-2008, 10:35 PM
  #62
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Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 View Post
Larry Robinson - ask Dave Schultz.

Marcel Bonin was pretty tough also. Ted Harris somewhat under-rated. Henri Richard for his size could really go. Dave Morisette scored a win over Probert.
In the off season Marcel Bonin would make some money by wrestling with bears.

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05-07-2008, 10:43 PM
  #63
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Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 View Post
Larry Robinson - ask Dave Schultz.

Marcel Bonin was pretty tough also. Ted Harris somewhat under-rated. Henri Richard for his size could really go. Dave Morisette scored a win over Probert.
I disagree strongly about Henri Richard. Vic Hadfield of the Rangers (and others) regularly beat him like a drum whenever the Habs squared off with other teams in a brawl. I have no idea why you think he was a good fighter. He was 5'5" and 155 pounds. If you think about it, Saku Koivu, who's bigger (and strong for his size) would beat Henri to a pulp. However, that's not something Saku would ever do. Yvon Cournoyer was another small Hab who wan't much of a fighter.

I think Larry Robinson was the best fighter on the Habs.

Emile (Butch) Bouchard was good in his day but Pierre wasn't up to his level. Gilles Lupien was huge but not an invincible fighter.

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05-07-2008, 10:45 PM
  #64
Canadiens1958
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Gary Connelly

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcphee View Post
They had a guy named Connolly, I think one of our posters goes by him for his user name. He was only around a year or two, won a bunch of fights, but couldn't play much. He might've had some back problems. I'm typing this and I'm wondering if it was Carlson instead of Connolly. Obsessive as I am, I'll find it somewhere and correct myself.

Kent Carlson was the guy. One of those American guys that seemed to appear every year during the early 80's. Tough kid.
Gary Connelly was the tough guy on the 1968 - 69 Junior Canadiens but he never played in the NHL.

Cam Connor played a bit in the 1970's big but not a fighter. Scored an OT goal against Toronto in 1979.

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05-07-2008, 10:47 PM
  #65
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Originally Posted by Teufelsdreck View Post
I disagree strongly about Henri Richard. Vic Hadfield of the Rangers (and others) regularly beat him like a drum whenever the Habs squared off with other teams in a brawl. I have no idea why you think he was a good fighter. He was 5'5" and 155 pounds. If you think about it, Saku Koivu, who's bigger (and strong for his size) would beat Henri to a pulp. However, that's not something Saku would ever do. Yvon Cournoyer was another small Hab who wan't much of a fighter.

OK, Teuf., I remember the Hadfield fight. Hadfield was twice Henri's size, and had started up with JC Tremblay. Tremblay was back pedalling and Henri seemed embarassed to see his teammate fleeing the scene so he stepped in, and yeah, took a beating. It was a welter weight against a heavy though.

Wasn't the legend that in a brawl in Boston, Richard took on Flaman,Bionda, and Labine, same game, one after the other ? You have to rate him as pound for pound toughness.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 View Post
Gary Connelly was the tough guy on the 1968 - 69 Junior Canadiens but he never played in the NHL.

Cam Connor played a bit in the 1970's big but not a fighter. Scored an OT goal against Toronto in 1979.
I know, it was Kent Carlson, I've mixed them up before. I went to a lot of Jr. games in 68-69, most Friday nights in fact and remember Connelly quite well. He didn't get much icetime, though we screamed 'on veut Connelly' for hours on end.


Last edited by Beakermania*: 05-07-2008 at 11:02 PM.
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05-07-2008, 10:50 PM
  #66
Canadiens1958
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Henri Richard

Quote:
Originally Posted by Teufelsdreck View Post
I disagree strongly about Henri Richard. Vic Hadfield of the Rangers (and others) regularly beat him like a drum whenever the Habs squared off with other teams in a brawl. I have no idea why you think he was a good fighter. He was 5'5" and 155 pounds. If you think about it, Saku Koivu, who's bigger (and strong for his size) would beat Henri to a pulp. However, that's not something Saku would ever do. Yvon Cournoyer was another small Hab who wan't much of a fighter.

I think Larry Robinson was the best fighter on the Habs.

Emile (Butch) Bouchard was good in his day but Pierre wasn't up to his level. Gilles Lupien was huge but not an invincible fighter.

Henri Richard was able to handle Jack Bionda, Leo Labine, Fern Flaman of the Bruins,
Eddie Shack of the Leafs, Stan Mikita and him had a few good ones.

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05-07-2008, 11:21 PM
  #67
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Not even close. John Ferguson.

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05-08-2008, 12:04 AM
  #68
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05-08-2008, 12:08 AM
  #69
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In the off season Marcel Bonin would make some money by wrestling with bears.
Marcel Bonin is my grand-father and he told me a hell lot of stories like the one you stated, either as a police officer or an amateur boxer

He was also very short and didn't weight much, but always used to get the puck out of the corner and defend his teamates, very proud of him

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05-08-2008, 12:16 AM
  #70
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I was a Chris Murray fan.

Don't know why.

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05-08-2008, 12:26 AM
  #71
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Marcel Bonin is my grand-father and he told me a hell lot of stories like the one you stated, either as a police officer or an amateur boxer

He was also very short and didn't weight much, but always used to get the puck out of the corner and defend his teamates, very proud of him
Gump Worsley was my great-uncle. He once got an egg in the head and played without a mask, I think that qualifies as tough.

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05-08-2008, 12:31 AM
  #72
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Originally Posted by LeafRefereeeeeees View Post
Gump Worsley was my great-uncle. He once got an egg in the head and played without a mask, I think that qualifies as tough.
Tough, crazy.... theres a fine line there..... but yeah.

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05-08-2008, 12:40 AM
  #73
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[QUOTE=Teufelsdreck;14038399]I disagree strongly about Henri Richard. I have no idea why you think he was a good fighter. He was 5'5" and 155 pounds. Cournoyer was another small Hab who wan't much of a fighter.
the ? is toughest not best fighter
henri 20 seasons 11 cups 5'6" 160 lb.
the toughest may loose a few fights
the best fighter thru adversity

I think Larry Robinson was the best fighter on the Habs.

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05-08-2008, 12:55 AM
  #74
Teufelsdreck
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[QUOTE=jeanclaude;14039403]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teufelsdreck View Post
I disagree strongly about Henri Richard. I have no idea why you think he was a good fighter. He was 5'5" and 155 pounds. Cournoyer was another small Hab who wan't much of a fighter.
the ? is toughest not best fighter
henri 20 seasons 11 cups 5'6" 160 lb.
the toughest may loose a few fights
the best fighter thru adversity

I think Larry Robinson was the best fighter on the Habs.
Definitely Robinson.

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Old
05-08-2008, 12:59 AM
  #75
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Originally Posted by LeafRefereeeeeees View Post
Gump Worsley was my great-uncle. He once got an egg in the head and played without a mask, I think that qualifies as tough.
Yes, it happened in the warmups in the old Madison Square Garden after he was traded to the Habs for Jacques Plante. It was not just an egg, it was a hardboiled egg, and it put him out of the game. Worseley was very brave not to wear a mask. Once Frank Mahovlich actually took a slapshot at him from no more than about 10 feet. Not very sporting!

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