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Malkin Stick Curve Info

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Old
05-07-2008, 10:16 PM
  #1
sam12
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Malkin Stick Curve Info

I am buying a new stick and I was wondering if any one had info and stats on the Malkin Iginla and Hossa Curve. Lie, curve positioning and depth, openness of toe. Also, what does a 3/8 curve mean and what does a 12 mm curve mean? What are the strengths of each blade. Thanks a ton for your quick responses.

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05-07-2008, 10:38 PM
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PDO
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Who cares what name is on it? Especially when you don't know what the measurements mean anyway?

Go to the store, play around with a few sticks, and find one with a curve you like.....

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05-07-2008, 10:42 PM
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RealTalk
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The malkin curve (pm9) is described as followed by nike bauer open face, mid heel curve, round toe and lie of 5.

It's good for slap shots, passing and backhands.

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05-08-2008, 12:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RealTalk View Post
The malkin curve (pm9) is described as followed by nike bauer open face, mid heel curve, round toe and lie of 5.

It's good for slap shots, passing and backhands.

any curve can be used for either of those. it all depends on the person shooting and their shooting technique. that first post was right on. go the store and play with each curve see whats best for you.
ive talked to some people who have great control with a drury then try a lidstrom and suck ****, and vice versa.

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05-08-2008, 02:43 AM
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Originally Posted by deangamblin View Post
any curve can be used for either of those. it all depends on the person shooting and their shooting technique. that first post was right on. go the store and play with each curve see whats best for you.
ive talked to some people who have great control with a drury then try a lidstrom and suck ****, and vice versa.
a PM9 is an Easton Forsberg (formerly Modano), personally I think it's the best all around blade you can buy. It's above average for stickhandling, great for wrist shots and slapshots and saucer passes, and backhands are phenomenal, you can get the puck up on a deke on a dime.

3/8-of an inch.. correct me if I am wrong refers to the depth of the curve (how big it is)
12 mm is the length of the blade...the PM9 I believe is 9, whereas a Sakic is 12mm

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05-08-2008, 08:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diamond Joe View Post
a PM9 is an Easton Forsberg (formerly Modano), personally I think it's the best all around blade you can buy. It's above average for stickhandling, great for wrist shots and slapshots and saucer passes, and backhands are phenomenal, you can get the puck up on a deke on a dime.

3/8-of an inch.. correct me if I am wrong refers to the depth of the curve (how big it is)
12 mm is the length of the blade...the PM9 I believe is 9, whereas a Sakic is 12mm
Maybe I am just reading your response wrong, but. 12mm is less then half an inch, .47 to be exact. Pretty sure that's the depth of the curve in metric terms.

So to the original poster. Those two dimensions signify the depth of the curve. Some companies spec it in inches (3/8, 1/2), while other spec it in metric (9mm, 12mm).

If you aren't sure what type of curve you want, go with a mid curve. They are probably the best all around curve and easiest to get comfortable with. The Iginla and Hossa fall into category.

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05-08-2008, 10:31 AM
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Hugh Madbrough
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And just to point out...those are not the actual curves they use. If you are buying it for that reason, don't.

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05-08-2008, 11:11 AM
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I actually went to a store where you can shoot pucks with the curves, but I ended up liking all three of those curves greatly, and I have a tough time eyeballing the curves for some reason, so I wanted some info on the curves. I use an Iginla currently, but would like something with either a bit more curve or a bit more loft. I felt the Malkin had a bit more loft, but the same or even less curve, the Hossa had more curve. I am looking for statistics to back up these assesments as I have a tough time eyeballing the curve. As for the curves players actually use, I saw the Ovechkin in the store and it is nowhere near what he uses in actuality.!! Thanks for the responses, any more comments would be greatly welcomed.

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05-08-2008, 12:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diamond Joe View Post
a PM9 is an Easton Forsberg (formerly Modano), personally I think it's the best all around blade you can buy. It's above average for stickhandling, great for wrist shots and slapshots and saucer passes, and backhands are phenomenal, you can get the puck up on a deke on a dime.

3/8-of an inch.. correct me if I am wrong refers to the depth of the curve (how big it is)
12 mm is the length of the blade...the PM9 I believe is 9, whereas a Sakic is 12mm
see, it depends on the person. me i cant shoot worth **** with a modano/forsberg.
i like using a draper and saucer passes and wrist shots i have deadly accuracy with it. but thats just me once again.
if i was just starting out, id probably go with a sakic, i like to think its kind of in the middle of a drury and lidstrom mix.

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05-08-2008, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by deangamblin View Post
see, it depends on the person. me i cant shoot worth **** with a modano/forsberg.
i like using a draper and saucer passes and wrist shots i have deadly accuracy with it. but thats just me once again.
if i was just starting out, id probably go with a sakic, i like to think its kind of in the middle of a drury and lidstrom mix.
Yea Sakic or Lindros seem to be pretty middle of the road curves. I still rock a Lindros Supreme 3030...so pissed when they stopped producing it.

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05-08-2008, 01:19 PM
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Smyth curve...9/12 A curve that would make Kovalchuk blush.

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05-08-2008, 01:46 PM
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Originally Posted by ice berg slim View Post
Smyth curve...9/12 A curve that would make Kovalchuk blush.
Think you mean 9/16ths.

I have one as my back up. Decent pattern as far as toe curves go, but prefer my Draper. More loft and better shot control.

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05-08-2008, 04:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stick9 View Post
Think you mean 9/16ths.

I have one as my back up. Decent pattern as far as toe curves go, but prefer my Draper. More loft and better shot control.
My bad 9/16 is what I meant. I have a Draper Dolemite its ok but I would have taken a Smyth pattern anyday.

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05-09-2008, 10:31 AM
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I am buying a new stick and I was wondering if any one had info and stats on the Malkin Iginla and Hossa Curve. Lie, curve positioning and depth, openness of toe. Also, what does a 3/8 curve mean and what does a 12 mm curve mean? What are the strengths of each blade.

I use an Iginla currently, but would like something with either a bit more curve or a bit more loft. I felt the Malkin had a bit more loft, but the same or even less curve, the Hossa had more curve.

The Hossa is pretty similar to the Iginla. It shouldn't play any different. Both are 1/2" deep mid curves, slightly open. The Malkin is the PM9 curve, which is similar to the Easton Forsberg. It's a 3/8" deep mid-heel curve, slightly open.

I've used mainly the Iginla and Forsberg for the last year or more. The Forsberg seems to get the puck up in the air quicker because the curve is closer to the heel and there is a bit less curve to spin the puck. Typically I take more snapshots because the puck is easier to control and aim and flutters if I try to put too much spin on a wrist shot. The Iginla keeps the puck down a bit more (which is nice because I shoot high way too much) and puts more spin on the puck, but it's a bit harder to control where I'm aiming.

I bring them both and switch if something's not feeling right. They aren't night and day different, just a little different.

If you want more curve, check out the P88 Lindros curve, which is a bigger mid curve than the Iginla. The P92 Naslund or Sakic curve has more loft than the Iginla but plays a lot different.

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05-09-2008, 04:44 PM
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I used the Malkin and liked it for a year but than i met the Gagne curve.

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05-09-2008, 07:27 PM
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I use the Malkin/Forsberg curve,good for passing-backhanders-lifting the puck-not too curved for more of the sweet spot.

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05-09-2008, 09:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
I am buying a new stick and I was wondering if any one had info and stats on the Malkin Iginla and Hossa Curve. Lie, curve positioning and depth, openness of toe. Also, what does a 3/8 curve mean and what does a 12 mm curve mean? What are the strengths of each blade.

I use an Iginla currently, but would like something with either a bit more curve or a bit more loft. I felt the Malkin had a bit more loft, but the same or even less curve, the Hossa had more curve.

The Hossa is pretty similar to the Iginla. It shouldn't play any different. Both are 1/2" deep mid curves, slightly open. The Malkin is the PM9 curve, which is similar to the Easton Forsberg. It's a 3/8" deep mid-heel curve, slightly open.

I've used mainly the Iginla and Forsberg for the last year or more. The Forsberg seems to get the puck up in the air quicker because the curve is closer to the heel and there is a bit less curve to spin the puck. Typically I take more snapshots because the puck is easier to control and aim and flutters if I try to put too much spin on a wrist shot. The Iginla keeps the puck down a bit more (which is nice because I shoot high way too much) and puts more spin on the puck, but it's a bit harder to control where I'm aiming.

I bring them both and switch if something's not feeling right. They aren't night and day different, just a little different.

If you want more curve, check out the P88 Lindros curve, which is a bigger mid curve than the Iginla. The P92 Naslund or Sakic curve has more loft than the Iginla but plays a lot different.
Is that Malkin curve the same as the Lemieux?

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05-11-2008, 06:32 PM
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Is that Malkin curve the same as the Lemieux?
Lemieux is CCM'm equivalent of Easton's Sakic.

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05-15-2008, 04:12 PM
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I'm surprised how many people use the Modano/Malkin curve, it seems so slight that I figured only guys with a good grasp of shooting and the like would have an easier time with it and that most newer guys would use big curves. For all I know you guys do have a good grasp of shooting. Oh well.

In any case it's kind of weird, I got a Lindros style curve and I kinda hate it, for some reason I have a hard time getting a puck up in the air, yet the Modano curve just seems natural to me in every way.

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05-15-2008, 06:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Silent Bob View Post
I'm surprised how many people use the Modano/Malkin curve, it seems so slight that I figured only guys with a good grasp of shooting and the like would have an easier time with it and that most newer guys would use big curves. For all I know you guys do have a good grasp of shooting. Oh well.

In any case it's kind of weird, I got a Lindros style curve and I kinda hate it, for some reason I have a hard time getting a puck up in the air, yet the Modano curve just seems natural to me in every way.
Isn't the lindors a generic blade curve, just kind of curved with no other characteristics. The Modano (Forsberg) starts at the heel and opens up just a bit, it's really subtle, and it's really natural... i Love it for everything.

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05-22-2008, 12:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Silent Bob View Post
I'm surprised how many people use the Modano/Malkin curve, it seems so slight that I figured only guys with a good grasp of shooting and the like would have an easier time with it and that most newer guys would use big curves. For all I know you guys do have a good grasp of shooting. Oh well.

In any case it's kind of weird, I got a Lindros style curve and I kinda hate it, for some reason I have a hard time getting a puck up in the air, yet the Modano curve just seems natural to me in every way.
I love the Lindros. I have been using it for a good 4 years and will continue to use it. I find my slapshot is not the greatest with the curve though. The Spezza is among my favorites as well. I used the Malkin for a month up til it brooke. It took a while to get used to but once I did it was really good. My slapshot and backhand was better with a Malkin curve but the wrist shot was significantly worse than the Lindros.

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05-23-2008, 04:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sam12 View Post
I am buying a new stick and I was wondering if any one had info and stats on the Malkin Iginla and Hossa Curve. Lie, curve positioning and depth, openness of toe. Also, what does a 3/8 curve mean and what does a 12 mm curve mean? What are the strengths of each blade. Thanks a ton for your quick responses.
Use this to help make that curve!
http://www.passthepuck.net/id1000.htm

Head coach

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06-04-2008, 03:51 PM
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If your not sure and wanna try a new curve just buy a wood stick with the curve ya want. I like the Messier / Yzermen . Steep lie cause i like a short stick and a wicked curve to handle the puck. Takes a little practice to get it up on the back hand but no such thing as a free lunch. It also has a real short blade which for some reason i like. Like others have said , try a few to see what you like. The right stick can help your game a little, the stick not the material its made out of.

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