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Whipping into shape

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Old
04-30-2008, 10:42 PM
  #26
Sean Garrity
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So your 6 foot 190 lbs...are you scrawny, muscular, or kind of flubby is my question. If you eat like hell and stay under 190 i got a scenario for you.

As was mentioned earlier about the Candian rugby player i got a buddy trying to stay around 210 for baseball, but then again he is 6'4 or 6'5 so i figure it is roughly the same. He works out 3 times a week with weights, and runs probably 4 days a week normally all sprints with like a mile warmup/cooldown combined. Sprints will help you build leg strength and also get you quicker out of breaks. Hopping and running stars are also good as they build the core of your legs. He eats some insane amount of calories a day, something like 3500-4000, but that is because he is generally scrawny though he is quite muscular now. He doesn't eat crap necessarily but drinks about 3-4 glasses of chocolate milk a day and eats something like 3 sandwiches a day alone for snacks, usually with only one slice of bread consisting of tuna, turkey, or chicken.

IMO it all depends what you are at "naturally". Myself, Im 5'7 160 lbs naturally, but that is pretty flabby. Now, when i used to wrestle i was able to get down to 130's come weigh in day. Grant it i weiged around 155 coming into the room every monday, that was hard as hell and unhealthy for the most part as i ate around 1200 calories a day plus practice 5 days a week when i would lose around 15 lbs on Monday/Tuesday, and then i would weight around 145 cuz i would put on some of the weight. Now, by eating insanely perfect and practicing another 2 days i could get down to 132(usually there was a 2 day weight allowance) and award myself with something like a glass of water alone thursday night so i could weigh in correctly Friday. To modern day, if i cut my calories down to around 1500 i can easily get down to 145-150, but then i will get pushed around like mad. Therefore, i eat around 2500 calories a day and lift 3 days a week with running usually on 3/4 of the off days because i want to maintain or gain a little weight if anything. The problem is, i used to eat around 3000-3500 calories a day, but don't work out enough to lose weight or gain enough muscle so i became around 170-175 but flabby and felt sluggish.

I guarantee everyone else knows more than i do but, im just telling you my 2 experiances.

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Old
05-01-2008, 01:38 PM
  #27
Jarick
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Looks like you might be overtraining on that schedule. The idea is to do lifelong changes that you can stick with. Training a dozen times a week is recipe for injury or failure. And unless you really enjoy the gym, I find it's hard to stick with it due to boredom.

I've lost close to 40 pounds over the last couple years. Mostly it's through playing hockey and better diet. I eat only complex carbs, lean meats, as many veggies as I can stand, all the milk I can drink, nuts for snacks, diet soda (my vice), and keep the drinking to a minimum.

Here's my average daily diet:

1/2 cup oatmeal w/ some granola or fruit and milk for breakfast

handful of trail mix (almonds, other nuts and seeds, raisins, no candy) for snack

sandwich with Ezekiel bread, lean deli meat, slice of low fat cheese, mustard or light mayo, all the veggies you want for toppings, and milk for lunch

handful of trail mix for snack

whole wheat pasta with grilled chicken and all the veggies I can stand to eat or a salad with light dressing and milk for dinner

handful of trail mix with some dark chocolate and milk for snack

If I start gaining a couple pounds, I increase my water intake, exercise a bit more, and watch my food a bit closer (smaller portions usually). Usually I lose 10 pounds, gain a few back, lose 10 pounds, gain a few back, kind of yo yo, but mostly dropping weight over the long haul. I will have a couple cheat meals on the weekend and after watching my diet closely for several weeks, will let it go for a week.

For exercise, I play hockey 1-2 times a week when it's warm out, otherwise I'm on the pond a few times a week in the winter in addition to games. I've recently started hitting the exercise bike in the mornings to try and lose those last 10-15 pounds (the hardest!). That's why I started playing hockey, because I didn't like going to a gym, but playing hockey is fun, gets me in shape, I meet a lot of great people, and it gives me a sense of accomplishment and focus. So if going to the gym is fulfilling to you, by all means, but don't go to the gym to because you think you have to but because you enjoy it. Unless you're 15 and trying to play college hockey or something, then ignore what I wrote

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05-04-2008, 09:09 PM
  #28
Mr BLUEandWHITE
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roughneck View Post
1 pound of muscle burns about 50 cal at rest. Gain 10 pounds of muscle, you increase your metabolic rate by 500 calories per day just when you're sitting around. Of course you can just as easily reverse that, lose 10 pounds of muscle, you lose 500 cal/day at rest.

In short, muscle burns calories at rest, fat doesn't.
That is really cool I didn't know that. Do you know what it takes to gain a pound of muscle? And I used to work out quite a bit would it be easier for me to gain some of my previous muscle back? opposed to someone who has not worked out before.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammitch View Post
They are a very good source or protein and other vitamins, but they also contain ALOT of calories.
Yes, sorry this is also true. A handful shouldn't hurt any if you eat healthy and stay active.

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Originally Posted by Buffalo87 View Post
Cool, thanks for the good info. Just a question though, why do you say stay away from microwaves?
I read briefly in a book about how dangerous microwaves were and I haven't used one in probably almost a year. I found this very interesting article which gives a lot more in depth information on how dangerous microwaves can be to human health.


http://www.mercola.com/article/microwave/hazards.htm


Quote:
One short-term study found significant and disturbing changes in the blood of individuals consuming microwaved milk and vegetables. Eight volunteers ate various combinations of the same foods cooked different ways.

All foods that were processed through the microwave ovens caused changes in the blood of the volunteers. Hemoglobin levels decreased and over all white cell levels and cholesterol levels increased. Lymphocytes decreased.

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Old
05-07-2008, 09:51 AM
  #29
Jarick
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Well I'd take that microwave warning with a grain of salt. I can't find any support for those claims.

You can increase your metabolism by eating smaller meals more frequently, gaining muscle, and just being more active.

Frequent meals signal to your brain that you are full, which prevents starvation signals, and your body burns calories digesting the food. Smaller meals mean that you won't store excess food as fat. If you go long periods of time without eating, your body goes into starvation mode and will break down some of your muscle for energy.

Gaining muscle burns more calories as said above. Dieters who don't exercise often lose equal amounts of muscle and fat, which is part of why they often gain back MORE weight than they lost after going off the diet. You gain muscle by breaking it down through resistance training, then eating protein and carbs and resting to rebuild it. I found playing hockey a couple times a week and even just walking my dog or riding a bike was enough to prevent muscle breakdown while losing weight (and at 165 I fit into clothes that I wore previously at 150 with higher body fat...muscle weighs more than fat and takes up less space).

High intensity interval training (HIIT) cardio raises your metabolism and burns more calories than standard medium-intensity cardio. You might burn fewer calories over 20 minutes of HIIT than 45 minutes of regular cardio, but your heart pumps faster and your lungs keep working harder for a couple hours after you're done. Plus interval training mimics hockey shifts (45 seconds of intensity, two minutes of rest) and it's a lot quicker.

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Old
05-16-2008, 12:27 PM
  #30
NYRSinceBirth
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Interval training (HIIT) is even more so appropriate for hockey. Figure, if your on a bike, elliptical, even treadmill, dead on sprint/high resistance for 45-60 seconds then a 2 minute break. Very similar to most hockey game situations, 45-60 seconds on, about 2/2.5 minutes off. Not to mention HIIT training is MUCH more forgiving on muscle mass while STILL burning fat: Just look at long distance runners in relation to sprinters, for a crude example. Runners (endurance, long distance and time) are typically very skinny with little mass, but can run for days and have equally little fat. Sprinters, the good ones at least, have some serious muscle mass and low body fat. Why? Because their training (They focus on short distance performance) allows them to build up muscle while still burning fat, unlike the long distance runners who's bodies make it difficult to build muscle mass (As result of their training).

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Old
05-16-2008, 01:48 PM
  #31
WhipNash27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYRSinceBirth View Post
Interval training (HIIT) is even more so appropriate for hockey. Figure, if your on a bike, elliptical, even treadmill, dead on sprint/high resistance for 45-60 seconds then a 2 minute break. Very similar to most hockey game situations, 45-60 seconds on, about 2/2.5 minutes off. Not to mention HIIT training is MUCH more forgiving on muscle mass while STILL burning fat: Just look at long distance runners in relation to sprinters, for a crude example. Runners (endurance, long distance and time) are typically very skinny with little mass, but can run for days and have equally little fat. Sprinters, the good ones at least, have some serious muscle mass and low body fat. Why? Because their training (They focus on short distance performance) allows them to build up muscle while still burning fat, unlike the long distance runners who's bodies make it difficult to build muscle mass (As result of their training).
While I agree, there is never a time in a hockey game where you're sprinting down the ice for 45-60 seconds straight. At most you may do a 5-10 second sprint one way and then another one back. The rest of the time you pretty much have much more controlled or slower paced movement. Either way a 30 second sprint on the bike I think is a great way to start. I don't think most people who aren't in great shape can pull of 30 second sprints on a bike more than a few times.

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