HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > NHL Western Conference > Pacific Division > Calgary Flames
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
Notices

iggy (maximus gladiator)II

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools
Old
04-21-2004, 02:59 PM
  #1
neg marron
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: gatineau quebec
Country: Haiti
Posts: 1,378
vCash: 500
iggy (maximus gladiator)II

call me hockey crazy but the flames are on a serious roll don't be surprised if the go to the nhl finals that would be great ideally i would love to see iggy get a cup maybe 2 or 3 plus read the latest espn mag nfl draft issue(larry fitzgerald u pitt )there's a great iggy article


p.s.s whatever happened to iggy's web site will it ever be up again

iggy needs to be hyped like lebron hopefully if he wins a cup it will happen

www.imdb.com/title/tt0172495/


Last edited by neg marron: 05-26-2004 at 09:15 AM.
neg marron is offline  
Old
04-25-2004, 08:19 PM
  #2
Bicycle Repairman
HFBoards Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,695
vCash: 500
Why on earth does Jarome Iginla need to be "hyped" like LeBron James?

Bicycle Repairman is offline  
Old
04-29-2004, 10:04 AM
  #3
Zhackpot
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Texas
Posts: 540
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bicycle Repairman
Why on earth does Jarome Iginla need to be "hyped" like LeBron James?

Cause only then will American fans' view a player a legit.

It's all about image in the good ole U.S. of A.

Sad to think that values and integrity don't mean s#!t but if you drive an H2 or beat up your wife/girlfriend or both you are star material down here.

Zhackpot is offline  
Old
04-29-2004, 10:09 AM
  #4
AGraveOne
Registered User
 
AGraveOne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 2,138
vCash: 500
Send a message via Yahoo to AGraveOne
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zhackpot
Cause only then will American fans' view a player a legit.

It's all about image in the good ole U.S. of A.

Sad to think that values and integrity don't mean s#!t but if you drive an H2 or beat up your wife/girlfriend or both you are star material down here.
ouch! that is harsh. Might be true, too.

AGraveOne is offline  
Old
04-30-2004, 08:33 PM
  #5
WVP
Registered User
 
WVP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Country: United States
Posts: 13,027
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by redwingfan182
you know I think its funny... Iginla has got like 10 shots off this whole searies. we've been gaurding him to well so hes not the GLADIATOR that you want him to be obviosly. and ive learned it takes more than 1 player to run a team.
Once every team in the NHL has the Wings money, they'll be able to roll 3 lines of all-stars and a top 4 D of all-stars. With the all-star goalie in net. And learn how to spell.

WVP is offline  
Old
05-01-2004, 08:10 AM
  #6
djavan
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,170
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bicycle Repairman
Why on earth does Jarome Iginla need to be "hyped" like LeBron James?

jarome iginla needs to be "hyped" because of the way he plays and the way he carries himself on and off the ice...

he's an honest hard working hockey player who doesn't shun the media when he doesn't produce or when he does it is NOT all about him...

i had the pleasure to meet him this winter for a website story i wrote and everything everyone says about him is true; i.e. always smiling, honest and NOT full of himself...

now, unfortunately there are various other hockey players (who are not black) who have these same attributes (sakic, yzerman, etc.....) sadly they are not appreciated in the states where a lot of things are superficial...

furthermore, please clarify what you mean by "hyped" like lebron... does it mean that it's so much that you don't know about his teammates like many u.s. media outlets have done with the cavs or does it mean something else...

finally, here in the states the nhl game is fifth in popularity, behind nascar...

they are NOT going to have an over-the-air television contract next year, and just if the success of jarome iginla can attract a new audience (somewhat like tiger woods in golf or even arthur ashe, yannick noah and the williams sisters in tennis) then let's do it...

may i suggest you, and perhaps others, read the new book, "breaking the ice: the black experience in professional hockey" it is an honest and informative appraisal...

djavan is offline  
Old
05-24-2004, 02:18 AM
  #7
Bicycle Repairman
HFBoards Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,695
vCash: 500
Sorry for bringing this this thread back up, but Cecil Harris is a hack. He's a hack working from the periphery. I'm all for championing minorities in the sphere of sports, but when you read excerpts from Harris's book recounting that Anson Carter's uncomfortability with the Oilers' organization stemmed from the propensity of that organization and city's to western-style clothing, you just have to laugh. Harris has made generalizations about a populace. That makes him guilty of stereotyping.

So do what ends does a Jarome Iginla Hype Job do the NHL? The fact he is apparently black or the fact that he is a good hockey player? His mom is white. His grandparents are white. He was raised in the suburbs. He listens to soft 70's rock, contemporay Christian and country music. He's as about as "hip" as Pat Boone.

You're barking up the wrong tree if you think Jarome Iginla embodies the Black American Experience. It's just not there. He's not about to form a Posse, cut a phat rap record, get arrested or do anything that will gain "street" cred.

Leave him be. Let him do his stuff on the ice.

Bicycle Repairman is offline  
Old
05-24-2004, 02:26 AM
  #8
L'abstrait
Registered User
 
L'abstrait's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: St-Henri
Country: Qatar
Posts: 2,109
vCash: 500
Send a message via MSN to L'abstrait
Agreed!

L'abstrait is offline  
Old
05-24-2004, 09:47 AM
  #9
Badger Bob
Registered User
 
Badger Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: in my happy place
Country: Germany
Posts: 5,286
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bicycle Repairman
He's not about to form a Posse, cut a phat rap record, get arrested or do anything that will gain "street" cred.
It would bring it all to a whole new level. Mix Master Iggy does have a certain ring to it.

Badger Bob is offline  
Old
05-24-2004, 10:50 AM
  #10
djavan
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,170
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bicycle Repairman
Sorry for bringing this this thread back up, but Cecil Harris is a hack. He's a hack working from the periphery. I'm all for championing minorities in the sphere of sports, but when you read excerpts from Harris's book recounting that Anson Carter's uncomfortability with the Oilers' organization stemmed from the propensity of that organization and city's to western-style clothing, you just have to laugh. Harris has made generalizations about a populace. That makes him guilty of stereotyping.

So do what ends does a Jarome Iginla Hype Job do the NHL? The fact he is apparently black or the fact that he is a good hockey player? His mom is white. His grandparents are white. He was raised in the suburbs. He listens to soft 70's rock, contemporay Christian and country music. He's as about as "hip" as Pat Boone.

You're barking up the wrong tree if you think Jarome Iginla embodies the Black American Experience. It's just not there. He's not about to form a Posse, cut a phat rap record, get arrested or do anything that will gain "street" cred.

Leave him be. Let him do his stuff on the ice.


yes, i will watch jarome PROUDLY as he does an excellent job on the ice...

you mention several stereotypes in your response that suggest all Black people should behave one way...

NO, Black people are not a monolith!!!

throughout the diaspora we have many different interests, just as i dare say many other groups of people...

in fact you prove that by your overwhelming "knowledge" of the "urban lingo" (forgive the assumption if by chance i am wrong)...

also, what makes jarome very special is that he doesn't run from who he is, while also understanding his role in context to what went down before him... and if you comprehended the entire book you would have at least an undertanding or even an appreciation for what other Black players went through when they attempted to play in the league...

if the anson carter situation is the only thing you walk away from the book then i suggest you read it again...

finally, i have no problem hearing different points of view, but please come with a bit more than that...

THANKS

djavan is offline  
Old
05-24-2004, 11:11 AM
  #11
djavan
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,170
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by HABSTRAK
Agreed!

BREAKING THE ICE HELPS BREAK THE SILENCE


Throughout the African Diaspora there are countless stories where our people have gone against the grain to do what their hearts desired.

You know those brave souls who decided that their blackness was not defined by some limiting stereotype they had claimed and others placed on them.

However, even here in the 21st century this is still somewhat relevant for believe it or not there are some who believe that getting good grades in school and speaking clear English are shall I say, whack.

Also, for the purposes of this discussion, there are those parents who come up to Edmonton Oilers forward Georges Laraque and say, “they don’t want their kids to play hockey, because it is a white man’s sport.”

With that in mind I bring your attention to the few, the proud and those that thanks to a recently published book by author Cecil Harris are honestly telling their stories.

Breaking The Ice: The Black Experience in Professional Hockey is a perfect example for us all to appreciate the efforts of the skaters of color who bucked the odds.

From the near miss attempt that Herb Carnegie had in becoming the first Black hockey player in the National Hockey League (in the early 1950’s), to the actual first Willie O’ree (who played while blind in one eye), to other names from the not too distant past like Make Marson and Tony Mckegney to names of today like Anson Carter and Jarome Iginla, it is the first book of its kind and serves as an important history lesson.

“I basically wanted to read about Black hockey players like never before. I wanted to do the kind of book that I would’ve liked to have had when I was coming up,” Harris told me a while back.

Though it is certainly not earth shattering news to hear of the levels of racism many of these players faced, it is nonetheless important that we know.

For not only is this book well documented and thoroughly researched, the frankness and clarity in which the author gets the subjects to express their struggles is priceless.

Here are just some examples:

Marson, a second-round draft choice by the Washington Capitals in 1974 (19th overall), tells how his teammates acted as though they were members of the KKK. He played just under 200 NHL games, netting 24 goals before facing other similar incidents and deciding it wasn’t worth it.

Today he is a 5th degree black belt and an instructor.

After Mckegney signed his first professional contract with a World Hockey Association team in Birmingham, the owner had to rip it up because the fans weren’t quite ready to cheer for his skin color in the mid 1970’s.

In 912 NHL games he scored 320 goals.

“I have an enormous amount of respect for all of them. So many guys had to overcome,” says Harris.

Another delightful aspect of this presentation is that it looks to the future and shows that there is another wave of skaters of color, like Rane Carnegie the grandchild of Herb who is in the Toronto Maple Leafs organization.

Furthermore, we learn that just as with the other top sports the battle is also being waged at other levels. Former tough guy Graeme Townshend coached in the minors, while Darren Lowe is a successful bench boss at the University of Toronto, and Bill Riley is one of a few General Manager’s at the minor league level.

Clearly, the fact that there are Black hockey players should not come as a surprise, especially when you consider the importance of exposure and geographical environment when considering this issue.

Parenthetically, you should also throw in the huge costs when it comes to hockey equipment, but the example of the Mayers brothers (pointed out in the book) shows that if there is a will there is a way.

Jamal, a rugged forward for the St. Louis Blues, has just completed his eighth season in the league.

Many of these skaters of color have roots in Caribbean cities and they chose the ice over say the green grass of the soccer field because they moved at a young age to Canada, where the game is second to none.

Unfortunately, we live in a world where the depth and scope of Black people is not considered relevant by much of the mainstream. You either fit into that square peg or you’re ostracized.

This continues to be a problem for the league when it comes to marketing the sport to newer audiences despite the success and level of class displayed by the two-time goal scoring champion Jarome Iginla (this past season he shared that honor with two others who also scored 41 goals), and certainly with more up and coming talent on the way the NHL might get called for being offsides on this issue at this important time for the league’s future.

Please remember names like, Anthony Stewart, Nigel Dawes and Shawn Belle. All three played integral roles in Team Canada’s silver medal at the World Junior Championships this past winter, with Stewart (drafted by the Florida Panthers, 25th overall) and Dawes (selected by the New York Rangers) among the tournament’s best players. Meanwhile, Belle, a fast-skating defenseman, was the 30th choice overall by the St. Louis Blues.

Perhaps even more alarming is the amount of outright dismissals Harris encountered when offering the book to potential suitors.

“One basic theme I got from publishers was that hockey fans don’t read books and Black people don’t like hockey,” says the dismayed author.

“Hearing that really angered me. It made me more determined to get the book published.”

Fortunately, Insomniac Press out of Toronto deemed it necessary to support this work.

The author’s personal experiences also give him a unique perspective.

Harris grew up in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn and though he had an interest in several other sports, hockey caught his eye so much that he fondly recalls sleeping with the radio and listening to games while wishing he could share his excitement with his classmates and friends the next day.

“I couldn’t talk about it with my family. My mother thought I was only watching it for the fights. It was the only sport I couldn’t talk to others about.”

Nevertheless, the love remained as he started his writing career and eventually became the first beat writer for the Carolina Hurricanes, and sadly still faced the “what are you doing here mentality.”

Harris remembers incidents in cities like Pittsburgh and Montreal where the security guards questioned his press credential.

Despite all of this the book is a must read for everyone, even hockey fans and certainly us Black folks.

For no better example of the importance of this publication rests with 18-year old John Carter, who has just finished playing his senior year for Fox Lanes High School in New York’s Putnam County.

Just a year ago the six foot, four-inch, 190 pound forward had given up on the game that his skills made look easy.

After some tough love from family and friends, his brother Malcolm relocated John from Detroit to Mount Kisco where he stayed with his family and helped lead the high school team to the sectional championships, and all the way to the state quarterfinals.

John also plays in various junior leagues to showcase his skills to prospective scouts and colleges.

He is currently all set to graduate while considering offers from top division I college programs, prep schools and is also a possible selection in this year’s NHL draft.

In early February John got the opportunity to meet the author when Malcolm and family took him to a book signing.

“It was the best birthday present I could’ve ever had,” John Carter recalls.

“I had the opportunity to see that what I am doing is important in terms of our history. All the things my father, family and friends were telling me about (not to quit) sunk in. Seeing him talk about all of this made me want to cry.”

djavan is offline  
Old
05-24-2004, 04:42 PM
  #12
Badger Bob
Registered User
 
Badger Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: in my happy place
Country: Germany
Posts: 5,286
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by djavan
...

you mention several stereotypes in your response that suggest all Black people should behave one way...

NO, Black people are not a monolith!!!

...

in fact you prove that by your overwhelming "knowledge" of the "urban lingo" (forgive the assumption if by chance i am wrong)...

...

finally, i have no problem hearing different points of view, but please come with a bit more than that...

THANKS
Chill, dawg.

That was BR's best post here in months. We've gotta have some fun here, every now and then.

Badger Bob is offline  
Old
05-25-2004, 01:29 AM
  #13
Cactus Jack
Registered User
 
Cactus Jack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Parts Unknown
Posts: 2,912
vCash: 500
Send a message via MSN to Cactus Jack
Djavan, did you pick your name after the Brasilian singer?

Anyways, I think Iginla is the type of guy the lead could use to build cred with. For all the on and off ice reasons that we love Jarome, he'd make a great, young embassador for the sport. This guy is just so nice, and like Barry Melrose says, mothers, you want your daughters to grow up marry a guy like Jarome. The NHL doen't usually market itself using one face, but if they had to pick one, Iggy would be the ideal choice. Iginla represents what athletes should be like, and I'd like to see him get his due as one of the top handful of players in the league (the best in my opinion, and yes, that is my opinion), but as long as he gets his due in hockey circles I'm a happy man.

GO FLAMES GO!!!

Cactus Jack is offline  
Old
05-25-2004, 07:26 AM
  #14
djavan
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,170
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cactus Jack
Djavan, did you pick your name after the Brasilian singer?

Anyways, I think Iginla is the type of guy the lead could use to build cred with. For all the on and off ice reasons that we love Jarome, he'd make a great, young embassador for the sport. This guy is just so nice, and like Barry Melrose says, mothers, you want your daughters to grow up marry a guy like Jarome. The NHL doen't usually market itself using one face, but if they had to pick one, Iggy would be the ideal choice. Iginla represents what athletes should be like, and I'd like to see him get his due as one of the top handful of players in the league (the best in my opinion, and yes, that is my opinion), but as long as he gets his due in hockey circles I'm a happy man.

GO FLAMES GO!!!

yes, i did pick my name after him...

i love his music, and was blessed enough to see him in concert a few years back...

by the way i also like steely dan, depeche mode, the dave matthews band, the cure, the the, jazz and conscious rap music...

anyways, i couldn't agree with more about iggy...

i met him this past january and he's all that and a bag of chips...

PEACE

djavan is offline  
Old
05-26-2004, 09:26 AM
  #15
neg marron
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: gatineau quebec
Country: Haiti
Posts: 1,378
vCash: 500
i
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bicycle Repairman
Sorry for bringing this this thread back up, but Cecil Harris is a hack. He's a hack working from the periphery. I'm all for championing minorities in the sphere of sports, but when you read excerpts from Harris's book recounting that Anson Carter's uncomfortability with the Oilers' organization stemmed from the propensity of that organization and city's to western-style clothing, you just have to laugh. Harris has made generalizations about a populace. That makes him guilty of stereotyping.

So do what ends does a Jarome Iginla Hype Job do the NHL? The fact he is apparently black or the fact that he is a good hockey player? His mom is white. His grandparents are white. He was raised in the suburbs. He listens to soft 70's rock, contemporay Christian and country music. He's as about as "hip" as Pat Boone.

You're barking up the wrong tree if you think Jarome Iginla embodies the Black American Experience. It's just not there. He's not about to form a Posse, cut a phat rap record, get arrested or do anything that will gain "street" cred.

Leave him be. Let him do his stuff on the ice.
iggy is black that's an undeniable fact he couldn't pass for white if he tried trying to down play him being black is denial every time he looks in the mirror he's reminded of it iggy has embraced his racial diversity

neg marron is offline  
Closed Thread

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:47 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. ©2014 All Rights Reserved.