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Floor hockey goaltending tips

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Old
08-28-2008, 09:07 PM
  #1
Le Tricolore
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Floor hockey goaltending tips

So, on Sunday my team starts off their pre-season in floor hockey (note: not roller hockey), and we'll be short a couple of guys for the opening game. I decided that unless we find a replacement goalie, which seems unlikely at this point, that I'll give it a go.

I haven't played goalie since I was about 12 or 13 years old, and I wasn't too good back then. I imagine I'll be even worse now.

I was just looking for some tips, and pointers.

I'll obviously try the freeze the ball whenever I can if the other team is around the net, but that's about the only plan I've got right now, haha.

Any help, no matter how obvious it may seem to you, would be useful, I am sure.

Thanks!

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08-28-2008, 09:16 PM
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Kruky
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First thing I'd say is not to throw yourself on the ground for no reasons, you'll get tired quickly. Not to mention all the high shots.

Wear shorts, because you'll sweat like crazy. And drink some gatorade.

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08-28-2008, 10:06 PM
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deanosaur
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Hasek Style

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Old
08-29-2008, 11:42 AM
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The Lollipop King
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Remember to come out of the net, and close the 5 hole or you'll get an std.

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08-29-2008, 12:22 PM
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noobman
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It depends on the calibre of players as well. Lesser players will fall into the trap of shooting high EVERY TIME, especially if you're using a ball instead of a puck. Smarter players will try to get you to drop and then go high, or try to beat you down low.

Basically, you want to make yourself appear as big as possible if you don't have the hand-eye, reflexes, or agility to be a sloppy goalie. Stand your ground... and if a guy drops his head for a second don't be afraid to poke check or slide into him =)


Oh, and one more thing:
HACK THE BONE!

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Old
08-29-2008, 12:52 PM
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Fixed to Ruin
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Since I played goalie for floor hockey here's a few tips i used ...

The first thing i suggest is to try and cover the bottom 1/2 of the net almost on every shot since most shots will be low to the ground.

Since most floor hockey spaces are smaller than an actual ice hockey rink there is less time and space for forwards to aim for that perfect top-corner shot, therefore i would encourage your defencemans to put lots and lots of pressure on the shooters, giving them less opportunites to find places to roof the ball. That will force forwards to shoot lower to the ground meaning you can control the rebounds alot easier than a blocker save or something off your shoulders that will go who-knows where...

Another thing you will notice with very hard wrist shots and slap shots (if allowed) is that there will be a nasty spin on the ball. That nasty spin will cause the ball to curve or sink, therefore if you see someone winding up to take a big slapshot your better off taking a few steps forward to cut down on the angle because it is unlikely you will be able to react to any shots that curve or sink on you.

I like to help my defenceman in front of the net, so if i see a pass thats within my range in front of the net or from behind the net i try to break it up with a poke-check.

Drink plenty of fluids as it will get extremely hot

Get ready to flop around Hasek style on rebounds......

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08-29-2008, 01:25 PM
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dhasek3910
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Just to touch on a few things some users have already said:

1. make sure you come out and challenge, with the decreased rink size, if you come out the net will seem that much smaller to the shooters.

2. the spin is really wicked on far away shots, dont let them fool you. Sometimes those shots go in more than the one timers from the slot. Make sure you watch the ball if they wind up and fire one from far away.

3. One more thing to say: Make sure you line yourself up to the ball, NOT the shooter. This will help cut down angles and minimize holes for the ball to go in.

4. Good luck!

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08-29-2008, 05:07 PM
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MikeD
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I would disagree with most on the long hard slap/snap shot. These shots can tend to have wicked curve. With a shooter who kows how to play that curve you do not want to push out.

. shooter
) curve
- you

you push out and the ball curves around you/further from your body/harder save. You play into this shooters game by pushing out. In ice there are many times when the goalie is outside the paint. On floor with a ball this isnt the case. Many floor leagues use a square box that players may not step inside. Your heels would be on the edge of this area at furthest. Exceptions would be breaks or an odd many rush.

try to keep your steps/strides shorter/ small shuffles to stay square to the ball.. If you are unsure of your position in the crease This will help as well as taking any chance to get back center of net then come out to reset.

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08-29-2008, 05:37 PM
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yes, the ball curve is the most difficult thing about a shot. i found when i played in net the toughest shots were the point shots. what i did on basically every shot was just go down in a butterfly to take up the most space.

the key thing is to challenge the shot, i found the players have a difficult time passing the ball around so dont worry so much about the pass. always play the shot.

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08-29-2008, 05:55 PM
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Le Tricolore
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Thanks guys, keep them coming!

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08-30-2008, 01:56 AM
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My advice is to just keep the game simple. Stay in net, look big, tell your defensemen to keep your sight lane to the puck clear, and focus on the game. If you do that, you should do the best you can do. I mean honestly if you don't have goalie athleticism(like you said you didn't in the first post), you really can't do anything to fix that, but as long as you play it safe, and smart and use your fundimentals(spelling?), you should be fine for one game

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Old
08-30-2008, 03:05 AM
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Vito_81
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I've been playing floor hockey goalie for about a year now. I was always road hockey goalie as a kid, but never ice hockey.

I find that if you challenge the shooter. never play the pass and let the d worry about that. Hug your posts and have a short memory. Odds are that you'll give up more "bad" goals than great ones, let those ones slide. Like most have said, just try to look big in there and let them hit you. It takes one hell of a shot to go cheese in a little floor hockey gym with an orange ball if you're challenging the shooter properly.

BRING WATER/GATORADE.

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Old
08-30-2008, 06:10 AM
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Mr Wentworth
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Have your defensemen force them wide, crappy angle shots have less of a chance. (This is actually good in any league.)

The ball spin. UGH! You can't plan for it. It'll happen on slaps, wristers...you're just gonna have to deal with it.

Rebounds. Those damn orange balls like to bounce alot. Get ready to fall on those rebounds. If not, learn how to stack the pads quickly.

My favorite warm up routine. After I was loose, I'd line up about 6-7 pucks (or balls) about 15 feet from the net, between the two circles, and then it became like that all-star goalie event, the name of which I can't think of. One player shoots all the pucks. Shoots the first puck, waits a second, shoots the second, waits a second, shoots the third, etc...they shoot if I'm ready or not. If I'm in position or not, they were told to shoot. You'll be surprised as to what you can learn from this.

It also depends on the level of the opposition. If its a clean one on one shot, I used to like to give them the 5 hole. A nice big Belfour sized hole. Lower skilled players would usually take the bait, and since I was planning on flopping and covering it up, 9 out of 10 times I'd win.

Good luck man.

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Old
08-30-2008, 06:25 AM
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Claude28Giroux
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I've been around floor hockey all my life. The most drastic change between goalie in ice or roller is the curve of the ball. The harder the shot the harder that ball curves. I don't know the skill of the league you are playing in but seeing as you live in Canada, it'll prolly be good. Every guy has their own speed and shot style, saying as this one guy i played with, his shot was low and incredibly fast (hit 100 mph once on a radar at a tourney), some guys shots always go high though, the best thing is IMO to take a gander at the opposing team's warm up shots, get a feel of how they shoot, and where.

You gotta be ready and anticipate the curve, honestly if you never tried to stop a curving ball coming in really fast (near 90 mph-ish), it'll be one ugly day. I could sit here all day and talk but w.e. All in all its freaking ball hockey have fun man, and don't be afraid to protect your crease.

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Old
08-30-2008, 08:55 AM
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Most of the stuff I would echo....the curve on the ball is the most important thing. I had a clear line of sight of a shot about half court (we were on a basketball court) and the spin and bounce went right between my legs so u really have to pay attention. Plenty of Fluids is another thing. You will sweat so much it is ridiculous. Otherwise just stay focused and challenge shooters on breakaways...cutting down the angle will help keep the ball from bouncing b4 it gets to you and will offer them less net to shoot at. Good luck!

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Old
08-30-2008, 11:08 AM
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My advice:

1. Watch your corners. Letting in a wraparound goal can be some of the most deflating for a team. Don't ask me why, but my team always had trouble rebounding after the goalie let in a wraparound. I guess its because it looks pretty and stoppable.

2. Trust your defencemen. Even if they faulter sometimes, your D-men will bail you out of a lot if you trust them.

3. Intimidate. Don't show fear. Confidence is what drives goalies, and if you make the other team think you're on fire, they are going to let pressure get to them. Less human you are, the better.

4. Don't let ANYONE in your crease. I say this as a gritty, crease owning left winger. If I'm in your way, you'll never properly cover your corners. Your forwards have to deal with getting the ball/puck off of the opposing players, and if they do it by the blue line, that crease crowder will be at a disadvantage when making it back up to their zone. Make it your job to get him out of the way. Be cheap, goalies don't get caught that often for it.

5. NEVER, EVER, EVER SHOW FRUSTRATION AFTER A GOAL. Show your frustration between periods. If your teams knows your frustrated during the game, they'll play more D to try to help you being flustered. That might be good if your team doesn't play enough, but trust me, you want them on the offence.

6. Breakaways: Look to number 3. Make the guy think theres no way around you. Also, watch out for opposing players catching up to him. My goalie always got caught on breakaways turning into 2 on 1 one-timers.

That's my advice. I'm a... what is it... 11 year Organized Floor Hockey veteran. Like I said, its my job to crowd the net and piss off the goalie because I can make it back to my goalie before a play happens. I know how to get into a goalies head. When I think their confidence is unmoveable, I usually give up trying. Confidence is key. And yes, its all in your head.

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Old
08-30-2008, 11:09 AM
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I'll echo the points about the curve of the ball and the Gatorade. Water just does not cut it.

One thing to keep in mind playing goalie in floor hockey as opposed to ice hockey is that you can stand up, put your legs together, and there is no room alongside your feet for a ball to slide past. This is unlike ice hockey where you've got the slight elevation of your skate blades to consider which can leave enough space for a puck to slide in under your pad, beside your skate blade. In tight-angle situations, you can use this stance to block off the entire net instead of having to use a butterfly or paddle-down stance. You get no rebound control, though, you're just acting as a wall.

Wear steel/fiberglass-toe sneakers if you've got them. I also like sneakers that have relatively little treading so you can shuffle/slide easier. Sneakers with too good a tread will grip the floor too much - I was reminded of this the hard way a couple weeks ago when I forgot my regular goalie sneakers. It plays havoc with side to side movement.

Rebounds will be livelier so try to direct them when you can instead of counting on deadening them. This does take a lot of practice/experience though.

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Old
08-30-2008, 12:06 PM
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If you're down and out, don't be afraid to like flail and throw limbs this way and that.

It's easier to be a goalie in floor hockey, so if you get burned and he's going the other way, you can roll over on your back.

Yeah, I was a bit nuts playing goalie.

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09-01-2008, 12:40 PM
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Robo-Pope
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vito_81 View Post
I find that if you challenge the shooter. never play the pass and let the d worry about that.
This is especially true. By experience, most people who play floor kind of suck, so they're not going to be killing you on precision one-timers.

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09-01-2008, 01:59 PM
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So Howd it go?

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09-01-2008, 03:04 PM
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Seth Lake
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I would recommend making sure that you are always lined up square with the ball, rather than lining up with the shooter. Also, make sure to take short strides when shuffling side-by-side. This allows you to keep the five-hole closed and also allows you to react quicker when needing to take a large/explosive stride on a cross-crease opportunity by allowing you to set your feet quicker than if you are taking larger strides across the crease.

Remember to keep positive mentally. Every shot is a new opportunity for you to learn and make a save. You cannot change the past, so don't get down about any one goal. Always make your best effort to save the "next one".

Lastly, communicate in advance with your defense that in any situation where the attack comes down a wing that you have the shot and to make sure that they defend against the pass since it is so hard to move quickly laterally. You want to face as many shots squared off from the angle, rather than having to dive back across the crease in desperation.

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Old
09-01-2008, 07:50 PM
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Le Tricolore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buffalo Soldier View Post
So Howd it go?
We ended up borrowing another team's goalie. I took my regular shift on defense, heh

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Old
09-04-2008, 07:34 AM
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Mr Wentworth
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We were all worked up for a cinderella story!

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Old
09-04-2008, 12:12 PM
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Maxpac
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the est tips i,ve got is one, don't stay in the net, play atleast 5 feet in front, that way you cover my ground, 2 , use your stick as much as possible, it's alot easier to poke a rubber ball then a puck believe me 3. forwards always go simple in breakaways, so when they get really close to you, throw yourself in the directrion you think they'l try to deke you

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Old
09-05-2008, 05:13 PM
  #25
Le Tricolore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cfelix View Post
We were all worked up for a cinderella story!
I would have let 15+ goals at least.

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