HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The History of Hockey
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The History of Hockey Relive great moments in hockey history and discuss how the game has changed over time.

HOW did the Rangers get to the 1986 Conference Finals?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
10-11-2008, 03:20 PM
  #1
Al Bundy*
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Country: United States
Posts: 5,073
vCash: 500
HOW did the Rangers get to the 1986 Conference Finals?

The 1985-86 New York Rangers, IMO, may be the strangest playoff cinderella of the divisional playoff era.

I know most people associate playoff cinderellas of that era with the 1990-91 North Stars, but that team had some potent scorers in Modano, Bellows, and Gagner.

The 1985-86 Rangers, OTOH, did not.

Their top scorer, Mike Ridley, had fewer points than Brian Leetch had assists in his 1991-92 Norris Trophy winning season.

Ted Sator- not exactly one of the greatest coaches in Ranger history.

It still stuns me that one of the more mediocre Blueshirt teams went farther than the 1991-92 team (other than the Beezer, who else was on both teams?)

IMO, the fact that they beat Philly and Washington is a hocey miracle.

BTW, one fact: Patrick Roy's famous OT game against that team in the Wales Conference Finals; overrated game, because he looked good against a team that wasn't exactly known for great goal-scoring.

HOW DID THIS TEAM GET THAT FAR?

Al Bundy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-11-2008, 03:28 PM
  #2
MXD
Registered User
 
MXD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 20,864
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Bundy View Post
The 1985-86 New York Rangers, IMO, may be the strangest playoff cinderella of the divisional playoff era.

I know most people associate playoff cinderellas of that era with the 1990-91 North Stars, but that team had some potent scorers in Modano, Bellows, and Gagner.

The 1985-86 Rangers, OTOH, did not.

Their top scorer, Mike Ridley, had fewer points than Brian Leetch had assists in his 1991-92 Norris Trophy winning season.

Ted Sator- not exactly one of the greatest coaches in Ranger history.

It still stuns me that one of the more mediocre Blueshirt teams went farther than the 1991-92 team (other than the Beezer, who else was on both teams?)

IMO, the fact that they beat Philly and Washington is a hocey miracle.

BTW, one fact: Patrick Roy's famous OT game against that team in the Wales Conference Finals; overrated game, because he looked good against a team that wasn't exactly known for great goal-scoring.

HOW DID THIS TEAM GET THAT FAR?
Even if they were at the end of the road, Wilf Paiement and Pierre Larouche were still solid players at that time. If they would have played the whole year in NY, they would probably have had more points than Ridley.

Beezer was also better than Froese and Peeters.

MXD is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
10-11-2008, 03:33 PM
  #3
blamebettman*
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Country: Norway
Posts: 1,948
vCash: 500
Well, timely OT heroics against Washington, clutch goaltending by Vanbiesbrouck.

That team was pretty solid top to bottom. Ron Greschner, James Patrick, good defensive forwards in Kelly Miller and Tomas Sandstrom.

blamebettman* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-11-2008, 07:20 PM
  #4
MS
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 12,208
vCash: 500
Simply put, great team defense and a great goalie.

That team couldn't score a lick, but were 3rd in the NHL defensively. Vanbiesbrouck had a ridiculous year - won the Vezina, and NYR were 31-21-5 with him in net as opposed to 5-17-1 with his backups getting the decision.

For the playoffs, a few things happened. Pierre Larouche, the team's best goalscorer, returned from injury (he'd scored 20 goals in just 27 regular-season games) and had a huge playoffs. Wilf Paiement was aquired at the deadline and chipped in 10 playoff points. And Bob Brooke, an unsung checker, turned in the performance of his career with 15 playoff points. The extra offense from those three guys was enough to turn a .500 regular-season team into a legitimate playoff threat.

MS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-11-2008, 09:03 PM
  #5
reckoning
Registered User
 
reckoning's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Country: Canada
Posts: 5,277
vCash: 500
During the playoffs last season there was a commercial running on The Score Network concerning playoff memories where a former Ranger who played in that series (Mark Osborne I think) talked about how when Philadelphia won Game 4 (by a 7-1 score) the Flyer players were really rubbing it in and making fun of the Rangers. He said that made beating the Flyers in Philly in Game 5 to win the series all the more satisfying.

It's not uncommon to see a team who makes it to the Final get knocked out early the following year. I think Bob Froese was unfairly made a scapegoat that loss. Keenan and the other Flyers deserved some of the blame as well.

reckoning is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-11-2008, 09:23 PM
  #6
Canadiens Fan
Registered User
 
Canadiens Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 735
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Bundy View Post
The 1985-86 New York Rangers, IMO, may be the strangest playoff cinderella of the divisional playoff era.

I know most people associate playoff cinderellas of that era with the 1990-91 North Stars, but that team had some potent scorers in Modano, Bellows, and Gagner.

The 1985-86 Rangers, OTOH, did not.

Their top scorer, Mike Ridley, had fewer points than Brian Leetch had assists in his 1991-92 Norris Trophy winning season.

Ted Sator- not exactly one of the greatest coaches in Ranger history.

It still stuns me that one of the more mediocre Blueshirt teams went farther than the 1991-92 team (other than the Beezer, who else was on both teams?)

IMO, the fact that they beat Philly and Washington is a hocey miracle.

BTW, one fact: Patrick Roy's famous OT game against that team in the Wales Conference Finals; overrated game, because he looked good against a team that wasn't exactly known for great goal-scoring.

HOW DID THIS TEAM GET THAT FAR?
Roy's famous OT performance in game three is only overrated to those who didn't see it.

Jean Beliveau called it the greatest display of goaltending he had ever seen. Nuff said.

Canadiens Fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-11-2008, 09:43 PM
  #7
Doctor No
Retired
 
Doctor No's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 23,398
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens Fan View Post
Roy's famous OT performance in game three is only overrated to those who didn't see it.

Jean Beliveau called it the greatest display of goaltending he had ever seen. Nuff said.
Yep.

Known for great goal-scoring or not, the Rangers still got 47 shots on Roy in that game. It was a great performance.

Doctor No is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-12-2008, 11:53 AM
  #8
Big Phil
Registered User
 
Big Phil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Country: Canada
Posts: 18,527
vCash: 500
That was Beezer at his best so to speak. He really only has two years that went against his playoff choking label and those are '86 and '96. He was a big game goalie that year and was the best in the league at that particular time. Pierre Larouche still had 17 points in the '86 playoffs, so his veteran leadership helped as well

Big Phil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-16-2008, 01:33 AM
  #9
vikash1987
Registered User
 
vikash1987's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Westchester, NY
Country: United States
Posts: 527
vCash: 500
In a previous thread asking how the Panthers succeeded in 1996, I noted that a smothering defense was chiefly responsible (on top of the Beezer's excellent performance in net).

In 1986 with the Rangers, the same variables essentially existed: defensemen such as Greschner, Huber, Patrick and Ruotsalainen were terrific, and Vanbiesbrouck dominated between the pipes.

vikash1987 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-16-2008, 01:42 AM
  #10
Randall Graves*
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Country: United States
Posts: 18,621
vCash: 500
Usually the simple answer to cinderella runs is one thing...great goaltending, that's what's great about hockey moreso than any other sport can a great goaltending performance influence a game, In football the quarterback doesn't have the ball all the time, in baseball really one player can't steal you a game you don't deserve to win, same in basketball sans the real great players.

In hockey you can be totally dominated and win if your goalie steps up.

Randall Graves* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-16-2008, 10:02 AM
  #11
vadim sharifijanov
Registered User
 
vadim sharifijanov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 9,089
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by vikash1987 View Post
In a previous thread asking how the Panthers succeeded in 1996, I noted that a smothering defense was chiefly responsible (on top of the Beezer's excellent performance in net).

In 1986 with the Rangers, the same variables essentially existed: defensemen such as Greschner, Huber, Patrick and Ruotsalainen were terrific, and Vanbiesbrouck dominated between the pipes.
and essentially the same result: bounced by patrick roy.

vadim sharifijanov is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-16-2008, 11:53 PM
  #12
vikash1987
Registered User
 
vikash1987's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Westchester, NY
Country: United States
Posts: 527
vCash: 500
haha, very true

vikash1987 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:11 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.