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Happy Remembrance Day!

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Old
11-11-2008, 10:16 AM
  #26
waffledave
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I was sitting at my desk with my eyes closed at 11:11 for a moment of silence and my boss got upset. I set him straight and he apologized. The guy is a Russian Siberia war vet so I hope I really got through to him.

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11-11-2008, 10:26 AM
  #27
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Originally Posted by Dutchy View Post
During WWII, my family lived in Oisterwijk, a small town in southern Netherlands, when Nazi Germany invaded. In 1945, they were liberated by Canadian and Scottish soldiers. Shortly after, the Canadians decided to convert their house into a field hospital, which would shelter the wounded who required immediate help. The friendly soldiers and medical crews couldn't have left a better impression on my frightened family. They were polite, helpful, respectful and took care of the 7 children whenever my grandparents needed some privacy.

When the war was over, the Netherlands were of course in ruins, and the Dutch government suggested that some of its nationals should try and relocate elsewhere in the world. My grandfather was left with 3 choices: Australia, Canada or the Netherlands Antilles. In order to help him decide, he held a family council where his wife and the kids unanimously elected to go to Canada. The Canadians were so nice and friendly that, if they had to move away from home, they couldn't see themselves living elsewhere. And so, it as decided, in 1954 the small family sailed to sea across the pond.

Every Remembrance day, I think about my family's journey. The Canadian soldiers went beyond their duty to protect my grandfather's children. Fighting the enemy is one thing, but forming a bond strong enough to convince strangers to immigrate wasn't part of the field manual. I am grateful to all the boys who made my family's dream of a peaceful life possible.

It is not my goal to start a debate, but I strongly believe that Canada's army should remain a peacekeeping force. Our expertise and knowledge should be used for helping the populations afflicted by war. Please help others as you have helped us. Furthermore, as I know this war isn't the most popular, I feel that our troops should not suffer because of our leaders mistakes as they need our support.
Thanks for sharing that, my man.

Thats an amazing story

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Old
11-11-2008, 10:31 AM
  #28
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heh, some guy asked for a moment of silence at 11:00. Very nice of him.

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11-11-2008, 10:34 AM
  #29
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Our thoughts, prayers and gratitude are with all those who sacrificed greatly for our freedom.

Our thoughts and prayers should also be with every common soldier who had to endure the brutality and horror of war.

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11-11-2008, 12:51 PM
  #30
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I think it's natural to think of whatever family members served at this time of year. I had Uncles overseas, my wife lost her Uncle in WW2, her Father served in Korea, my Uncle Ben was gassed in WW1, and suffered throughout his life from the effects.

My Dad was in the army during the end of WW2 and was stationed in Hamilton,Ont. The war ended , thankfully, before he went overseas. So, his stories weren't of a tragic nature but I'll tell one anyways. One of Mtl's better known boxers at the time, was a guy named Greco. He was in the same troop or squad as my Dad and they chatted now and then. They were doing phys ed one day, and apparently, boxing was on the schedule. My Dad figured it would be cool if he pre-arranged to fight Greco, getting him to agree to let him win. Greco said sure, land a few shots, I'll make you look good.

Dad lands a few jabs, people start to cheer, and that's the last thing he remembers. Johnny Greco knocked him out cold. Sucker.

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Old
11-11-2008, 01:00 PM
  #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchy View Post
During WWII, my family lived in Oisterwijk, a small town in southern Netherlands, when Nazi Germany invaded. In 1945, they were liberated by Canadian and Scottish soldiers. Shortly after, the Canadians decided to convert their house into a field hospital, which would shelter the wounded who required immediate help. The friendly soldiers and medical crews couldn't have left a better impression on my frightened family. They were polite, helpful, respectful and took care of the 7 children whenever my grandparents needed some privacy.

When the war was over, the Netherlands were of course in ruins, and the Dutch government suggested that some of its nationals should try and relocate elsewhere in the world. My grandfather was left with 3 choices: Australia, Canada or the Netherlands Antilles. In order to help him decide, he held a family council where his wife and the kids unanimously elected to go to Canada. The Canadians were so nice and friendly that, if they had to move away from home, they couldn't see themselves living elsewhere. And so, it as decided, in 1954 the small family sailed to sea across the pond.

Every Remembrance day, I think about my family's journey. The Canadian soldiers went beyond their duty to protect my grandfather's children. Fighting the enemy is one thing, but forming a bond strong enough to convince strangers to immigrate wasn't part of the field manual. I am grateful to all the boys who made my family's dream of a peaceful life possible.

It is not my goal to start a debate, but I strongly believe that Canada's army should remain a peacekeeping force. Our expertise and knowledge should be used for helping the populations afflicted by war. Please help others as you have helped us. Furthermore, as I know this war isn't the most popular, I feel that our troops should not suffer because of our leaders mistakes as they need our support.
thanks for sharing that Dutchy. A good friend of mine, his family settled in Southern Ontario, told me a very similar account of his families plight from the Netherlands at virtually the same time.

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Old
11-11-2008, 01:00 PM
  #32
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Here's a little sample since you keep your eyes closed...

Quote:
Originally Posted by loudi94 View Post
Ignorant, yes. Appalling- I disagree. Part of me likes that people my age (36) and younger have no real concept of what sacrifices were made. It means that we haven't had to repeat the tragedy of war. In the broad scope of teaching students social studies, war is not something that you can spend a ton of time on. Once again- isn't that a good thing? I see both sides and I tend to flip flop.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQNibKFoq6w

This is now, not another generation. I'm 34. I have friends who just got back from war. How can you have "no real concept"?

War sucks and I'm against it and those going on now, but don't close your eyes and ears to what is now and real. There are men and women suffering for us, for your right to write here and we should all remember that!

I really mean no harm, but I think some in "our" generation need to be more aware of the sacrifices made by "our" generation!

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Old
11-11-2008, 01:04 PM
  #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loudi94 View Post
Ignorant, yes. Appalling- I disagree. Part of me likes that people my age (36) and younger have no real concept of what sacrifices were made. It means that we haven't had to repeat the tragedy of war. In the broad scope of teaching students social studies, war is not something that you can spend a ton of time on. Once again- isn't that a good thing? I see both sides and I tend to flip flop.
Can we really say that...have we already forgotten the 1st Gulf War and the one that is ongoing. I am more afraid that we may have glorified the war effort, we too easily dismiss the human factor and marvel at the technology and weaponry of today.

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Old
11-11-2008, 01:29 PM
  #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Artie View Post
Can we really say that...have we already forgotten the 1st Gulf War and the one that is ongoing. I am more afraid that we may have glorified the war effort, we too easily dismiss the human factor and marvel at the technology and weaponry of today.
My wife's Dad was one of those guys you'd see on the front of the Gazette every November as he'd speak at schools on behalf of the Legion. I was talking with a friend of mine's son and he said that it'd be cool to ask him about some of the action that he saw. The kid's a normal West Island teenager, you've met him I think.

I explained to him that the one thing you seldom hear veterans discuss is 'action'. They did what they felt they had to do and I'm sure over a beer on cribbage night at the Legion, they can look each other in the eye and know things that I'll never know, but they don't glorify war, at all. Not the ones I know anyways.

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11-11-2008, 02:18 PM
  #35
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Exactly....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Artie View Post
Can we really say that...have we already forgotten the 1st Gulf War and the one that is ongoing. I am more afraid that we may have glorified the war effort, we too easily dismiss the human factor and marvel at the technology and weaponry of today.
Again, not asking anyone to accept why there is war or approve it, but please don't say we have no "concept" of the sacrifices being made. Plenty of us do, including yours truly.

I won't say anything beyond the fact that, in most of our eyes, I've had a terrible day, but after reading and thinking about what those fighting for us or those who have fought for us go through, this day is a piece of cake and I have nothing to complain about!

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Old
11-11-2008, 02:40 PM
  #36
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Originally Posted by Tenacious C View Post
Good point...its not a day of celebration, its a day of observation and recollection.
yeee, unless u work at a bank (such as myself) and u get the day off... kick ass

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11-11-2008, 02:53 PM
  #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hockeyscribe22 View Post
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQNibKFoq6w

This is now, not another generation. I'm 34. I have friends who just got back from war. How can you have "no real concept"?

War sucks and I'm against it and those going on now, but don't close your eyes and ears to what is now and real. There are men and women suffering for us, for your right to write here and we should all remember that!

I really mean no harm, but I think some in "our" generation need to be more aware of the sacrifices made by "our" generation!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artie View Post
Can we really say that...have we already forgotten the 1st Gulf War and the one that is ongoing. I am more afraid that we may have glorified the war effort, we too easily dismiss the human factor and marvel at the technology and weaponry of today.
I may be mistaken but I beleive that loadi94 served with the Canadian armed forces in Afghanistan.

I think he's suggesting that we don't have the same concept of loss and sacrifice as those who served in WWI, WWII and Korea etc.... because for the most part we've enjoyed relative peace.

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11-11-2008, 03:27 PM
  #38
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Originally Posted by theonejc View Post
yeee, unless u work at a bank (such as myself) and u get the day off... kick ass
Public servant here

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Old
11-11-2008, 03:28 PM
  #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by habfan4 View Post
I may be mistaken but I beleive that loadi94 served with the Canadian armed forces in Afghanistan.

I think he's suggesting that we don't have the same concept of loss and sacrifice as those who served in WWI, WWII and Korea etc.... because for the most part we've enjoyed relative peace.
But have we really enjoyed peace or have we grown used to the idea of war everywhere. WW1, WW2 and to a great degree the Korean war was fought in a time when news reports were not as readily available to us folks back home. Yet with the influx of news stations and the internet, we have the war stories in our faces all day long, all week long...it's hard to understand how can we not have the same concept of loss and sacrifice. I think we've trivialized the effects.

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11-11-2008, 03:31 PM
  #40
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My bad.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by habfan4 View Post
I may be mistaken but I beleive that loadi94 served with the Canadian armed forces in Afghanistan.

I think he's suggesting that we don't have the same concept of loss and sacrifice as those who served in WWI, WWII and Korea etc.... because for the most part we've enjoyed relative peace.
Misunderstood him.

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Old
11-11-2008, 03:57 PM
  #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Artie View Post
But have we really enjoyed peace or have we grown used to the idea of war everywhere. WW1, WW2 and to a great degree the Korean war was fought in a time when news reports were not as readily available to us folks back home. Yet with the influx of news stations and the internet, we have the war stories in our faces all day long, all week long...it's hard to understand how can we not have the same concept of loss and sacrifice. I think we've trivialized the effects.
We may have greater exposure to the horrors of war but I'd argue that it doesn't have the same impact.

We're all aware that Canadians are serving and dying in Afghanistan and that Americans are serving and dying in Iraq/Afghanistan. For the most part when we watch news footage of a military hearse being driven along the Highway of Heroes we are momentarily touched/dismayed by some anonymous family's loss. However since we view these events through the dehumanizing prism of television/news/internet it's not a personal experience.

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Old
11-11-2008, 04:11 PM
  #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by habfan4 View Post
I may be mistaken but I beleive that loadi94 served with the Canadian armed forces in Afghanistan.

I think he's suggesting that we don't have the same concept of loss and sacrifice as those who served in WWI, WWII and Korea etc.... because for the most part we've enjoyed relative peace.
I did not serve. You are bang on as to what I was trying to say.
As a culture/society we did not experience the terrible losses and hardships that were incurred during the first 2 world wars. Yes, we have soldiers fighting/ peacekeeping and yes there are still casualties- but it's just not in that same scale. That is a good thing. We should never forget the past and honouring veterans is very important. My dad would tell me stories about being a young boy in Italy during the war. The hardships he endured are something I and most everyone in my generation has never come close to, therefore it's hard to comprehend.

BTW, I have a ton of respect for our current soldiers, but I also have a ton of respect for police officers who put their lives on the line on a daily basis. I like to say a little prayer for them on this day as well.

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Old
11-11-2008, 04:22 PM
  #43
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Old
11-11-2008, 09:32 PM
  #44
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Murphy's Law: "Lest we forget"

http://insidehockey.com/blog/lest_we_forget

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Old
11-11-2008, 11:49 PM
  #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenacious C View Post
I heard something interesting about the battles of WW1 on the History channel...


The alluded to how the first war was slowly fading from Memory to History. I think its important for everyone to keep remembering what went on in the trenches of Europe.
Yes it's really sad to see that happen. During the CBC coverage of the Rememberance Day ceremonies in Ottawa they showed a clip of the last surviving Canadian WWI vet, 108 years old. Boy I hope they give him a state funeral when he goes.

The sacrifices they made are amazing, it's way too difficult to fathom. Some of these people saw that we were losing the war and saw the amount of casualties, yet still signed up. Hell some even lied about their age to sign up. Incredible.

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