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Twenty years of Soviet Hockey: 1962 - 1982

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Old
11-17-2008, 08:14 AM
  #26
Sturminator
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Vladimir Shadrin:

Born June 6th, 1948 in Moscow, Russia
Club team: Spartak

Soviet League top-5 scoring finishes:

4th (72-73)

Soviet League MVP voting finishes:

6th (70-71), 6th (75-76), 7th (72-73), 11th (69-70), 15th (76-77), 16th (74-75)

Soviet League all-star:

n/a

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

IIHF Best Forward:

n/a

IIHF all-star:

n/a

World Championships top-5 scoring:

n/a

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Olympics top-5 scoring:

1st (1976)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Other:

1972 Summit Series: 4th points

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11-17-2008, 08:30 AM
  #27
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Vladimir Vikulov:

Born July 20th, 1946 in Moscow, Russia
Club team: CSKA



Soviet League top-5 scoring finishes:

2nd (71-72), 3rd (72-73), 4th (74-75), 5th (67-68)

Soviet League MVP voting finishes:

2nd (70-71), 3rd (71-72), 4th (69-70), 9th (76-77), 10th (75-76), 11th (73-74), 11th (74-75), 15th (77-78)

Soviet League all-star:

(69-70) - (70-71) - (71-72)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

IIHF Best Forward:

n/a

IIHF all-star:

1971 - 1972

World Championships top-5 scoring:

2nd (1972), 5th (1967), 5th (1970)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Olympics top-5 scoring:

3rd (1972)

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Old
11-17-2008, 08:39 AM
  #28
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Now that the draft is all but over and I've profiled all the guys I'm going to, here are the sources:

- The Hockey Archives - this is an excellent site for information on European leagues and international play over basically the entire course of hockey history. It's all in French, and it's framed, so if you want to fact check, click on Archives on the left.

- Chidlovski's 70's Soviet League page - lots of good information here, though there are some inconsistencies, as well. I have gone with the Hockey Archives whenever the two disagree.

- Eurohockey.net

There are other sources (chidlovski's various sites among them), but these are the important ones.

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Old
11-17-2008, 03:45 PM
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sturminator View Post
... I've profiled all the guys I'm going to...
1962-1982 and no profile of Starshinov? no Mayorov?

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Old
11-19-2008, 04:15 AM
  #30
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Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
1962-1982 and no profile of Starshinov? no Mayorov?
Yeah, yeah. I'll get around to it.

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Old
11-25-2008, 12:03 PM
  #31
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Hey Sturm, I'm wondering something that might be completely off base and since you have recently done the research, I'll ask you rather than take the time myself!

Let's say things were different in the 70s and the Soviet players were able to play in the NHL. Does Kharlamov have the durability and straight up toughness to be great in the NHL? I know that's kind of a loaded question, but there's quite a few instances where he seemed to be injured playing against Canadian teams. Obviously '72 was a slash to the ankle that could happen to anybody. But in '76 after the hit by Van Impe he was pretty useless, and he stayed down after what to me appears to be not that hard of a check. Then he got hurt in '79 in the challenge cup if I'm not mistaken. This could all be fluke, because he seems pretty tough to have stayed in the summit series with the broken ankle and maybe he was getting older by Challenge cup. Just wondering if you know if he was injury prone, or more of an appropriate question, had he played in the NHL during the years of the Big Bad Bruins and then Broad Street Bullies would he have been the same player?

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Old
11-26-2008, 06:17 AM
  #32
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Hey raleh. My opinion on this subject:

- Kharlamov was a shell of his former self in 1979. He was never really the same player after breaking both ankles in a car crash in 1976 and was badly in decline physically by the time 79 rolled around. You don't draft Kharlamov for what he did at that point in his career, and I see no reason to fault him for it in this context.

- Clarke's slash is what it is. Again, clearly not Kharlamov's fault, though it does suggest that icing an enforcer might be a good idea on his team. If Bobby had done that in the NHL (even on as tough a team as Philly), there would have been serious consequences.

- the Van Impe hit in 76 is more troubling, but that was just one game - a single exhibition match between CSKA and the Flyers. I can't put too much stock in a single incident. I think most of the Soviet players from this era would have an adjustment to make if they played NHL hockey, but I don't believe these were soft men by any stretch of the imagination. Kharlamov's generation came up under the draconian training methods of Tasarov and had great passion for the game. Would there be an adjustment to a more physical style on smaller ice? Certainly, but many "pretty boy" forwards like Guy Lafleur were able to succeed in the 70's NHL, and I see no reason why the Soviet forwards would be any different. In the final analysis, I don't see physicality as a legitimate knock against Kharlamov.

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02-06-2010, 09:27 PM
  #33
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This thread will definitely be updated this year.

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Old
04-06-2010, 02:30 AM
  #34
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Sturm, a couple questions:

1. Where do you get the MVP voting beyond 5th?
2. Where do you get your world championship scoring lists? The reason I ask is, I compared your Mikhailov info to what I had in my bio from ATD12 and they don't perfectly match up. I used the SIHR stats database which, for IIHF tournaments, seems to be perfectly accurate. (there are always full assist and PIM totals, even back when elite league stats were sparse or nonexistent)

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Old
04-06-2010, 06:22 AM
  #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Sturm, a couple questions:

1. Where do you get the MVP voting beyond 5th?
From the Chidlovski link posted above. Just go into the individual Soviet League year, and you'll see quite deep lists for the MVP voting. They seem to jive with other sources (as deep as the other sources go), so I see no reason to question their validity, but it would also be nice to see an actual breakdown of the voting, which Chidlovski does not provide anywhere that I know of.

Quote:
2. Where do you get your world championship scoring lists? The reason I ask is, I compared your Mikhailov info to what I had in my bio from ATD12 and they don't perfectly match up. I used the SIHR stats database which, for IIHF tournaments, seems to be perfectly accurate. (there are always full assist and PIM totals, even back when elite league stats were sparse or nonexistent)
From the HockeyArchive link posted above. Actually, they have changed that site a bit. You now need to follow this link:

http://www.passionhockey.com/Archives.html

...to get to the archives page, and then click in the league/tournament you want for a specific year. I would probably trust SIHR over the above as a source if they disagree on small details. If they disagree on gross details...that might require further investigation.

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Old
04-06-2010, 09:32 AM
  #36
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A "natural born leader", the feisty winger who was the top scorer and top forward of the 1961 world championships, six-time captain of the Soviet national team, IIHF HOF inductee, three time 1st team all-star and Soviet team co-leader in points at the 1964 Olympics, tied with linemate Starshinov and with Yakushev with 7 goals and 10 points (and Mayorov was the IIHF-selected Top Forward of that Olympics), the passionate Boris Mayorov,



Quote:
Team captain Mayorov was key to six world championships for the Soviet Union in the 1960s, leading the tournament in scoring in '61 when he was named the tournament's best forward. He won the gold at both the '64 and '68 Olympics.
http://www.hhof.com/LegendsOfHockey/...p/t6gp06.shtml



Quote:
Soviet League All-Star (1959, 1962, 1966*, 1967, 1968*, 1969*) *-2nd/3rd team
Top-5 in Soviet League Scoring 7 Times (2nd, 2nd, 3rd, 3rd, 3rd, 5th, 5th)


Quote:
The best line in the history of Moscow Spartak and in the world in the late 1960s. Starshinov's line was famous for their aggressive style. Starshinov and, especially, Boris Mayorov loved to fight.
http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1...ers/segold.htm

BREAKING NEWS (I just found out): Mayorov robbed of IIHF Top Forward Award by Soviet Officials
Quote:
Following the Soviet Union’s 3-2 victory over Canada to lock-up the gold medal in the last match at Innsbruck, the International Ice Hockey Federation Directorate chose USSR right wing BORIS MAYOROV for their Best Forward award. The 25-year-old Soviet captain finished the seven-game final round-robin with seven goals and ten points. This left the Spartak Moscow skater tied with four others, including Soviet teammates VYACHESLAV STARSHINOV and VIKTOR YAKUSHEV, for the second-highest point total at Innsbruck.

Soviet hockey officials, meanwhile, took the award and handed it EDUARD IVANOV. This despite the fact that the 25-year-old CSKA Moscow man was, in fact, a defenseman. Ivanov did score four goals in seven round-robin games, which set a new record for Soviet rearguards at the Winter Olympic Games.

Incredible as it may seem today, the IIHF accepted this and, thus, into the record books went Ivanov’s name.
http://www.goironpigs.com/?cat=67


Last edited by VanIslander: 05-21-2010 at 04:42 AM.
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Old
04-06-2010, 10:04 AM
  #37
seventieslord
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sturminator View Post
From the Chidlovski link posted above. Just go into the individual Soviet League year, and you'll see quite deep lists for the MVP voting. They seem to jive with other sources (as deep as the other sources go), so I see no reason to question their validity, but it would also be nice to see an actual breakdown of the voting, which Chidlovski does not provide anywhere that I know of.
Wow, how did I not find this link before? That is marvelous info that helps to provide more depth to so many players. FOr example, there may be someone who was only top-5 in MVP voting once but perhaps he was 6th twice and 7th another time.

What are these "34 best players" and "18 best players" things? Do you know how they were determined?

As for the world championship leaderboards, I'll take a closer look one day. At SIHR, for international tournaments you can't click on it as though it was a league, you have to check the team lists individually, so I got Mikhailov's leaderboard placements by counting the players from other countries (and Soviets) who outscored him. Which does introduce potential for error.

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Old
10-18-2010, 08:10 PM
  #38
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Philadelphia selects LW Yevgeny Mishakov



Soviet Hockey Hall of Fame Member
8x Soviet League Champion
4x World Championship Gold Medalist
2x Olympic Gold Medalist
20th All-Time among Soviets in goals/game (everyone else in top 25 already selected)
48 goals in 91 career games for Soviet National Team
183 goals in 400 career Soviet League games
Merited Sports Master, 1968

Quote:
Mishakov gained notoriety during the 1972 Summit Series for engaging in a fight, a true rarity in the Russian game. He and Rod Gilbert got in the tournament's only fight, which was something completely new to Soviet hockey.

While fighting was heavily frowned upon in Russia, Mishakov was never reprimanded. In fact Mishakov, who had little choice but to drop the gloves when the usually mild-mannered Rod Gilbert began pummelling him, was recognized for sending a message to Canada by fighting back.

"We always criticize our players for fighting," commented Russian sports writer Lev Lebedev of Pravda. "In this series we didn't do that. If our players didn't stand up to the Canadians, there wouldn't have been enough players to complete the game! After the fight between Mishakov and Gilbert, the professionals began to realize that Russians can fight too."

Mishakov was one Soviet player who played full out. He was an energetic and exuberant forward who showed unbridled spirit, often on the penalty kill.

"The playing fury and fighting spirit of this normally reserved person are really astounding," said Vladislav Tretiak of Mishakov, in the book Kings of the Ice. "In workouts he's possessed and in games he can, if need be, spend five and even 10 shifts on the ice without substitution. And when he is replaced by another player, he'll sit on the bench as if nothing has happened, wink at one guy, nudge another in the ribs as though he has just had a good rest."
http://www.greatesthockeylegends.com...akov-dead.html

Quote:
Evgeny Mishakov was not famous for his slick skating or 1-on-1 skills. The most impressive parts of his performance were always his fighting spirit, game discipline, team dedication and determination to win the game. Mishakov was equally strong in defense and offense. His best play was associated with his on-ice partnership with xxx in the initial version of the experimental “torpedo” line created by Anatoly Tarasov.
http://www.chidlovski.net/1972/h_pla...me=%20Mishakov

Quote:
He was a decent goal scorer with the Soviet national team in the 1960s, scoring a career total of 49 goals in 91 games
http://www.hockeyfights.com/articles/192

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Old
10-26-2010, 02:04 PM
  #39
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BTW, why doesn't Vladimir Petrov ever get credit for being the all-time top scorer in the Soviet league (711 points)? Is it because those stats are deemed unreliable or what? And yet, some Mikhailov bios credit Boris as the record holder, for example English Wiki with 651 points (Joe Pelletier's Summit Series site has 675 points). I can accept that Mikhailov scored more goals, but I do believe Petrov got more points. What's going on there?

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10-26-2010, 02:57 PM
  #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VMBM View Post
BTW, why doesn't Vladimir Petrov ever get credit for being the all-time top scorer in the Soviet league (711 points)? Is it because those stats are deemed unreliable or what? And yet, some Mikhailov bios credit Boris as the record holder, for example English Wiki with 651 points (Joe Pelletier's Summit Series site has 675 points). I can accept that Mikhailov scored more goals, but I do believe Petrov got more points. What's going on there?
good question.

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Old
11-20-2010, 03:26 AM
  #41
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Some fantastic players highlited here. No doubt this generation of Soviet hockey players helped propel the game into a higher skill level. The best hockey I ever watched in my life was the 1987 canada cup best of 3 final. Even to this day, it is hard to argue that hockey games on a whole, were played on the level of those titanic battles between two great teams.

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Old
03-03-2011, 03:40 PM
  #42
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The Philadelphia Firebirds are happy to select a defenseman that brings a unique blend of offensive skill, physicality, and defensive ability, D Eduard Ivanov



3x Soviet 1st-Team All Star (1963, 1964, 1965)
1x Soviet 2nd-Team All Star (1966)
1x Soviet 3rd-Team All Star (1967)
1x Olympic Gold Medalist
3x World Championships Gold Medalist
4x Soviet League Champion
Best forward in 1964 Olympics/World Championships as a Defenseman
Soviet Hockey Hall of Fame Member
16 goals in 79 career National Team games
40 goals in 300 career Soviet League games

Quote:
Edward Ivanov had a North American first name, and he played a North American style of defense. He was a defensive defender who loved to play physically. He would do anything - sacrifice his body, block shots, clear the front of the net - in order for his team to win. He had a great ability to spring transition offense with his deadly accurate passing.

Edward started at the bottom and worked his way to the top. He started as a spare defenseman, but soon he was paired with one of the greatest Russian defensemen of all time - Alexander Ragulin. Ivanov's play quickly improved with the guidance of Ragulin. Soon Ivanov was considered one of the best players in the country, and the Ragulin-Ivanov tandem is still considered to be perhaps the best defensive duo in Russian history, with the possible exception of the Viacheslav Fetisov-Alexei Kasatonov pairing of the 1980s.

xxx wrote the following about Ivanov in his book Road to Olympus:

"Like an experienced warrior, he has many fine qualities, courage, and decisiveness. He is entirely dedicated to hockey, he is in love with the game, he thirsts for battle."

I don't think a hockey player on either side of the Atlantic could get a better quote from his coach.

Although the relationship between the two remained rocky at best, Ivanov enjoyed his best years under xxx. From 1963 through 1967, Ivanov was part of 4 USSR championships, and 3 world championships.

Always one to tinker with the game, xxx was particularly pleased with Ivanov's versatility and complete understanding of the game. This allowed xxx to experiment with what was known as "the System." Instead of two conventional defenders backing up three forwards, xxx created a five man unit with only one true defender, the great Alexander Ragulin. xxx and Anatoli Firsov were the explosive forwards, while xxx and Ivanov served as "semi-defensemen," almost like a mid-fielder in soccer. They would roam both ends of the ice, creating odd man situations in both the offensive and defensive zones. Ivanov's ability in both ends led to this revolutionary though still uncommon strategy.

Ivanov's shining moment came at the 1964 Olympics in Innsbruck, Austria. Ivanvov was a key player of the 1964 gold medal championship team in his only Olympic games. Under the revolutionary roaming system, Ivanov, still technically listed as a defenseman, scored 6 goals and 7 points in 8 contests and was named as the best forward in the Olympics.

Though his career with the national team was cut short, the 5'10" 185 pound Ivanov continued to play the game he loved until 1970. Though he was devastated by the demotion and the politics played, he never lost his love of hockey.
http://internationalhockeylegends.bl...rd-ivanov.html

Quote:
Alexander Ragulin's versatile defensive partner in the 1960s, Ivanov was the only defenseman to be named the top forward in Olympic hockey history.
http://internationalhockeylegends.bl...t-players.html

Quote:
He and Eduard Ivanov, who formed perhaps the best Soviet defensive pair of the sixties, always appeared on...
Can someone who owns the book The Red Machine: The Soviet Quest to Dominate Canada's Game finish this quote for me? I know someone here owns it. It would be greatly appreciated.

http://books.google.com/books?id=0h7...ed=0CEoQ6AEwBw

Quote:
The defensemen, Ragulin and Ivanov, would certainly be welcome on any of our best professional teams.-xxx, Canadian forward and future national team coach.
http://books.google.com/books?id=gO7...agulin&f=false

Quote:
Eduard Ivanov, the club's comic, is reported to be another of their top threats.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...d+ivanov&hl=en

Quote:
The ace "guards" for the visitors are Eduard Ivanov and Alexander Ragulin.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...d+ivanov&hl=en

Quote:
Edward Ivanov led the Russian scoring spree with three goals...
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...v+hockey&hl=en

Quote:
Ivanov's perfect pass to Starshinov, alone in front of the Canadian net, was relayed through a maze of players past Collins.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...ect+pass&hl=en

Quote:
Edward Ivanov gave the Russians' a 3-1 lead when he ripped a shot from the blueline...
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...v+hockey&hl=en


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Old
03-03-2011, 04:02 PM
  #43
TheDevilMadeMe
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Good quotes, but when you say stuff like this:

Quote:
3x Soviet 1st-Team All Star
1x Soviet 2nd-Team All Star
1x Soviet 3rd-Team All Star
Can you please post the years? It makes a huge difference, due to the rapid development of Soviet Hockey between the 1950s and 1970s.

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Old
03-03-2011, 04:15 PM
  #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Good quotes, but when you say stuff like this:

Can you please post the years? It makes a huge difference, due to the rapid development of Soviet Hockey between the 1950s and 1970s.
Fixed.

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03-03-2011, 11:56 PM
  #45
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Can someone provide me a link where I can find the All-Star and MVP voting for the Russian league. Also, should I post my Anatoli Firsov biography in here?

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03-05-2011, 03:40 AM
  #46
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This statistical analysis of Helmuts Balderis is great, places his results in the context of other Soviets.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Triffy
I was wondering for a while why Helmuts Balderis hadn't been picked in the ATD. I had a feeling he was criminally underrated. However, I hadn't taken a closer look at his career ever so I decided to see how good he actually was.

This study takes a look at Helmuts Balderis' prime years (1974/75 - 1984/85). His prime is broken down into three parts: His first Riga years, the CSKA years and the second Riga years. Both domestic league and international performances are studied.

1 RIGA DAYS (1973/74 - 1976/77)

1.1 Domestic league

1975
Rk Player Team GP G A PTS PTS/GP G/GP A/GP
1 Vladimir Petrov CSKA 34 27 26 53 1.56 0.79 0.76
2 Boris Mikhailov CSKA 35 40 11 51 1.46 1.14 0.31
3 Helmut Balderis Riga 36 34 14 48 1.33 0.94 0.39
4 Vladimir Vikulov CSKA 36 17 23 40 1.11 0.47 0.64
5 Aleksandr Bodunov Krylia 36 31 8 39 1.08 0.86 0.22
5 Valeri Kharlamov CSKA 31 15 24 39 1.26 0.48 0.77
x Yuri Lebedev Krylia 36 19 17 36 1.00 0.53 0.47
x Aleksandr Maltsev Dynamo 32 18 16 34 1.06 0.56 0.50

I've added historically significant players who didn't crack the top 5 or 10 (depending on the year) on my Excel spreadsheet. Their rankings are marked 'x'.

As can be seen from the table, Balderis was 3rd in scoring, behind only Petrov and Mikhailov. Kharlamov played fewer games, but he also had a lower PPG-ratio. Balderis was 2nd in goal scoring, behind only Mikhailov, who had two great playmakers in Petrov and Kharlamov helping him. He was the only bright star in his team Dinamo Riga. Eurohockey.net for example does not list any other players for the team’s 1975 roster. It would be interesting to know how much these players played on average during a game. I would assume that because Balderis was by far the best player in his team, his time on ice (TOI) was probably higher than the CSKA players’, but it’s only speculation.

1976
Rk Player Team GP G A PTS PTS/GP G/GP A/GP
1 Viktor Shalimov Spartak 36 28 25 53 1.47 0.78 0.69
2 Aleksandr Yakushev Spartak 36 31 20 51 1.42 0.86 0.56
3 Aleksandr Maltsev Dynamo 29 28 19 47 1.62 0.97 0.66
4 Helmut Balderis Riga 36 31 14 45 1.25 0.86 0.39
5 Vladimir Petrov CSKA 34 22 22 44 1.29 0.65 0.65
x Boris Mikhailov CSKA 36 31 8 39 1.08 0.86 0.22
x Sergei Kapustin Krylia 36 25 13 38 1.06 0.69 0.36
x Valeri Kharlamov CSKA 34 18 18 36 1.06 0.53 0.53
x Vladimir Shadrin Spartak 35 17 18 35 1.00 0.49 0.51

In 1976, Balderis was 4th in scoring. However, he tied for the lead in goals with Mikhailov and Yakushev (LW), who supposedly played on the same line with Shalimov (RW) and Shadrin (C). It must be noted that Dynamo Moscow’s Maltsev actually has the most impressive GPG-ratio. Spartak actually won the Soviet championship this season. For a second season in a row, Balderis has a higher assist total than Mikhailov who had much better players to play with.

1977
Rk Player Team GP G A PTS PTS/GP G/GP A/GP
1 Helmut Balderis Riga 35 40 23 63 1.80 1.14 0.66
2 Vladimir Petrov CSKA 35 26 36 62 1.77 0.74 1.03
3 Aleksandr Maltsev Dynamo 33 31 27 58 1.76 0.94 0.82
4 Boris Mikhailov CSKA 34 28 23 51 1.50 0.82 0.68
x Valeri Kharlamov CSKA 21 18 8 26 1.24 0.86 0.38

In 1977 Balderis led the league in goals and points with 40 goals and 63 points in 35 games. He was still the only quality player on Dinamo Riga. After this season, he was acquired to CSKA.

1.2 International

1.2.1 1976 World Championships

For whatever reason, Petrov wasn’t a part of the Soviet team. Czechoslovakia won gold and Soviets were 2nd. Martinec was the top scorer with 9 + 11 = 20 points.

Leading Soviet scorers
Rk Player GP G A PTS PTS/GP G/GP A/GP
1 Valeri Kharlamov 10 4 10 14 1.40 0.40 1.00
2 Boris Mikhailov 10 7 6 13 1.30 0.70 0.60
3 Helmut Balderis 10 3 7 10 1.00 0.30 0.70
4 Viktor Zhluktov 9 3 5 8 0.89 0.33 0.56

Now that Balderis got to play with better players, his assists totals increased significantly. It must be noted that in international play, assists had been tracked at least since 1932 Olympics, but in Soviet league, I have seen assists regularly awarded since 1974. It’s possible that for example, secondary assists weren’t awarded in Soviet league, but that’s again only speculation. I’m fairly confident to say that Spartak successful line Yakushev-Shadrin-Shalimov played together. As far as I know, Zhluktov played centre and would be the most likely candidate to have replaced Petrov. If, and it’s likely, Balderis didn’t play with Kharlamov and Mikhailov, he was again the most productive player on his line and he also showed that he wasn’t a one-dimensional goal scorer.

1.2.2 1976 Canada Cup

The whole Kharlamov-Petrov-Mikhailov line was missing and the Soviets couldn’t reach the finals. Balderis scored respectable 5 points in as many games. However, Zhluktov (10 points), Vikulov (7 points) and Maltsev (7 points) were more productive performers for the Soviets.

1.2.3 1977 World Championships
Rk Player GP G A PTS PTS/GP G/GP A/GP
1 Vladimir Petrov 10 7 14 21 2.10 0.70 1.40
2 Boris Mikhailov 10 12 7 19 1.90 1.20 0.70
3 Sergei Kapustin 10 9 7 16 1.60 0.90 0.70
4 Valeri Kharlamov 10 9 7 16 1.60 0.90 0.70
5 Helmut Balderis 9 8 7 15 1.67 0.89 0.78
6 Alexander Yakushev 10 7 4 11 1.10 0.70 0.40
7 Alexander Maltsev 8 1 9 10 1.25 0.13 1.13

Balderis scored again at a comparable rate to the other star players of the team. Only Petrov and Mikhailov scored significantly more. Balderis was named to the tournament's all-star team.

2 CSKA DAYS (1977/78 - 1979/80)

2.1 Domestic league

1978
Rk Player Team GP G A PTS PTS/GP G/GP A/GP
1 Vladimir Petrov CSKA 31 28 28 56 1.81 0.90 0.90
2 Boris Mikhailov CSKA 35 32 20 52 1.49 0.91 0.57
3 Yuri Lebedev Krylia 35 19 27 46 1.31 0.54 0.77
4 Vladimir Golikov Dynamo N/A 18 26 44 - - -
5 Valeri Kharlamov CSKA 29 18 24 42 1.45 0.62 0.83
6 Aleksandr Golikov Dynamo N/A 19 19 38 - - -
7 Viktor Shalimov Spartak 36 26 11 37 1.03 0.72 0.31
8 Peter Prirodin Dynamo N/A 20 16 36 - - -
9 Helmut Balderis CSKA 36 17 17 34 0.94 0.47 0.47
10 Vladimir Vikulov CSKA 34 12 22 34 1.00 0.35 0.65

During the first year in CSKA, Balderis became the most important secondary scorer on the team, which was to be expected. However, as a consequence of his supposedly decreased TOI, his total production decreased in comparison to rest of the league.

1979
Rk Player Team GP G A PTS PTS/GP G/GP A/GP
1 Vladimir Petrov CSKA 43 26 37 63 1.47 0.60 0.86
2 Peter Prirodin Dynamo 44 32 30 62 1.41 0.73 0.68
3 Boris Mikhailov CSKA 43 30 24 54 1.26 0.70 0.56
4 Aleksandr Golikov Dynamo 37 31 22 53 1.43 0.84 0.59
5 Aleksandr Volchkov CSKA 44 28 20 48 1.09 0.64 0.45
5 Helmut Balderis CSKA 41 24 24 48 1.17 0.59 0.59
5 Valeri Kharlamov CSKA 41 22 26 48 1.17 0.54 0.63
x Sergei Makarov CSKA 44 18 21 39 0.89 0.41 0.48

Aleksandr Volchkov was some kind of a one-year wonder as he would never again reach even 30 points after this. It’s likely that he played with Balderis and either Kapustin or Makarov. Balderis was again CSKA’s most productive offensive player behind the famous Kharlamov-Petrov-Mikhailov line, and he actually scored at exactly similar pace as Kharlamov. Prirodin who had several good years in Soviet league also had his best year in 1979. Same thing with Golikov.

1980
Rk Player Team GP G A PTS PTS/GP G/GP A/GP
1 Sergei Makarov CSKA 44 29 39 68 1.55 0.66 0.89
2 Helmut Balderis CSKA 42 26 35 61 1.45 0.62 0.83
3 Viktor Shalimov Spartak 44 34 19 53 1.20 0.77 0.43
4 Mikhail Varnakov Gorki 44 30 20 50 1.14 0.68 0.45
5 Boris Mikhailov CSKA 41 27 23 50 1.22 0.66 0.56
x Vladimir Krutov CSKA 40 30 12 42 1.05 0.75 0.30
x Vladimir Petrov CSKA 32 21 20 41 1.28 0.66 0.63
x Vyacheslav Anisin CSKA 41 12 28 40 1.08 0.31 0.78
x Aleksandr Maltsev Dynamo 36 11 28 39 0.90 0.38 0.52
x Valeri Kharlamov CSKA 42 16 22 38 0.90 0.38 0.52

This is the beginning of Makarov’s dominance. I find this year’s scoring table very interesting because there are so many possible line combinations. Did Kharlamov-Petrov-Mikhailov play together? Were Makarov and Krutov already playing on a same line? Or did Makarov and Balderis play together, one of them playing left wing? Despite having his best season yet in CSKA, Balderis returned to Dinamo Riga next season because of reasons which I’m unaware of.

2.2 International

2.2.1 1978 World Championships
Rk Player GP G A PTS PTS/GP G/GP A/GP
1 Alexander Maltsev 10 5 8 13 1.30 0.50 0.80
2 Boris Mikhailov 10 9 3 12 1.20 0.90 0.30
3 Helmut Balderis 10 9 2 11 1.10 0.90 0.20
4 Sergei Kapustin 10 6 5 11 1.10 0.60 0.50
5 Vladimir Golikov 10 7 3 10 1.00 0.70 0.30
6 Valeri Kharlamov 10 4 5 9 0.90 0.40 0.50
7 Viktor Zhluktov 9 3 5 8 0.89 0.33 0.56

In this tournament Marcel Dionne was selected the best forward with 9 + 3 = 12 points in 10 games. Again, Balderis scored at similar rate to his team mates, sharing the goal scoring lead in the tournament with Mikhailov and Dionne. Kapustin was selected to the all-star team instead of Balderis. Balderis scored 3 goals against the silver medal team Czechoslovakia in 2 games, including a goal in the 3-1 final win, so it’s not like he would have padded his stats against weaker opponents.

2.2.2 1979 World Championships
Rk Player GP G A PTS PTS/GP G/GP A/GP
1 Vladimir Petrov 8 7 8 15 1.88 0.88 1.00
2 Valeri Kharlamov 8 7 7 14 1.75 0.88 0.88
3 Boris Mikhailov 8 4 8 12 1.50 0.50 1.00
4 Sergei Makarov 8 8 4 12 1.50 1.00 0.50
5 Aleksandr Golikov 8 5 7 12 1.50 0.63 0.88
6 Helmut Balderis 8 4 5 9 1.13 0.50 0.63
7 Vladimir Gulikov 8 1 7 8 1.00 0.13 0.88

Makarov was starting to break through and had already taken Balderis’ place as the gold medal winning Soviet’s most important secondary scorer in 1979. It would be unfair to call it a disappointment as Balderis scored at above 1 PPG rate, but this tournament certainly wasn’t one of Balderis’ greatest legacy builders.

2.2.3 1980 Olympic Games

At least Aleksandr Golikov (13 points), Makarov, Mikhailov, Kharlamov and Krutov (11 points each) scored more points than Balderis (9 points). Again he was a productive player but not on a key role. Only once more (1983 World championships) after this tournament would Balderis play for the Soviets in a competitive tournament.

3 RIGA DAYS (1980/81 - 1984/85)

3.1 Domestic league

1981
Rk Player Team GP G A PTS PTS/GP G/GP A/GP
1 Sergei Makarov CSKA 49 42 37 79 1.61 0.86 0.76
2 Sergei Kapustin Spartak 44 36 25 61 1.39 0.82 0.57
3 Nikolai Drozdetsky CSKA 44 30 28 58 1.32 0.68 0.64
3 Valeri Belousov Chelyabinsk N/A 23 35 58 - - -
5 Viktor Zhlutkov CSKA 49 29 26 55 1.12 0.59 0.53
6 Viktor Shalimov Spartak 47 21 32 53 1.13 0.45 0.68
7 Helmut Balderis Riga 44 26 24 50 1.14 0.59 0.55
8 Sergei Shepelev Spartak N/A 28 20 48 - - -
9 Igor Larionov Voskresensk 43 22 23 45 1.10 0.48 0.63
10 Vladimir Petrov CSKA 40 19 25 44 1.10 0.48 0.63

I think this can be seen as some kind of an off-year for Balderis. He was again the best player on his team, getting the most ice time. He shouldn’t be expected to match Makarov’s scoring level, but several more players outscored him, as well. His production drop probably explains his absence from the national team this season.

1982
Rk Player Team GP G A PTS PTS/GP G/GP A/GP
1 Sergei Makarov CSKA 46 32 43 75 1.63 0.70 0.93
2 Aleksandr Kozhevnikov Spartak N/A 43 28 71 - - -
3 Vladimir Krutov CSKA 46 37 29 66 1.43 0.80 0.63
4 Viktor Shalimov Spartak 47 27 32 59 1.26 0.57 0.68
5 Igor Larionov CSKA 46 31 22 53 1.15 0.67 0.48
6 Sergei Kapustin Spartak 38 30 22 52 1.37 0.79 0.58
7 Viktor Tyumenev Spartak N/A 21 29 50 - - -
8 Aleksandr Orlov Spartak N/A 11 39 50 - - -
9 Nikolai Drozdetsky CSKA 46 28 16 44 1.05 0.59 0.46
10 Helmut Balderis Riga 41 24 19 43 1.05 0.59 0.46

Again, a good season from Balderis, but nothing that would increase his legacy.

1983
Rk Player Team GP G A PTS PTS/GP G/GP A/GP
1 Helmut Balderis Riga 40 32 31 63 1.58 0.80 0.78
2 Aleksandr Kozhevnikov Spartak 43 35 22 57 1.33 0.81 0.51
3 Vladimir Krutov CSKA 44 32 21 53 1.20 0.73 0.48
4 Aleksandr Skvortsov Gorki 44 27 20 47 1.07 0.61 0.45 
5 Igor Orlov Spartak 44 22 23 45 1.02 0.50 0.52
6 Vyacheslav Bykov CSKA 44 22 22 44 1.00 0.50 0.50
7 Peter Prirodin Riga 45 22 21 43 0.96 0.49 0.47
8 Aleksei Frolikov Riga N/A 30 12 42 - - -
9 Sergei Makarov CSKA 30 25 17 42 1.40 0.83 0.57

Suddenly Balderis jumps back at the top of the pack. For the first time he had decent linemates in Riga and he immediately ran away with the scoring title. I think this is extremely impressive season from Balderis because even Makarov couldn’t match his PPG rate. Note that Balderis had the most assists during this season (Viktor Tyumenev was 2nd with 26). The great season earned Balderis once more a spot in the national team.

1984
Rk Player Team GP G A PTS PTS/GP G/GP A/GP
1 Sergei Makarov CSKA 44 36 37 73 1.66 0.82 0.84
2 Vladimir Krutov CSKA 44 37 20 57 1.30 0.84 0.45
3 Nikolai Drozdetsky CSKA 44 31 20 51 1.16 0.70 0.45
4 Vyacheslav Fetisov CSKA 44 19 30 49 1.11 0.43 0.68
5 Aleksandr Kozhevnikov Spartak 33 33 14 47 1.42 1.00 0.42
6 Viktor Shalimov Spartak 44 24 21 45 1.02 0.55 0.48
7 Valeri Bragin Voskresensk N/A 19 26 45 - - -
8 Sergei Kapustin Spartak 41 22 21 43 1.05 0.54 0.51
9 Sergei Shepelev Spartak 44 21 21 42 0.95 0.48 0.48
10 Igor Larionov CSKA 43 15 26 41 0.95 0.35 0.60
x Helmut Balderis Riga 39 24 15 39 1.00 0.62 0.38

For the first time in this study, the 32-year-old Balderis didn’t crack in to the top 10, although he was close.

1985
Rk Player Team GP G A PTS PTS/GP G/GP A/GP
1 Sergei Makarov CSKA 40 26 39 65 1.63 0.65 0.98
2 Vladimir Krutov CSKA 40 23 30 53 1.33 0.58 0.75
3 Helmut Balderis Riga 39 31 20 51 1.31 0.79 0.51
4 Vladimir Zubrilchev Dynamo N/A 23 24 47 - - -
5 Igor Larionov CSKA 40 18 28 46 1.15 0.45 0.70
6 Sergei Abramov Izhvesk N/A 16 23 39 - - -
7 Viktor Shalimov Spartak 49 16 22 38 0.78 0.33 0.45
8 Sergei Shepelev Spartak N/A 21 16 37 - - -
9 Aleksei Kasatonov CSKA 40 18 18 36 0.90 0.45 0.45
10 Valeri Bragin Voskresensk N/A 14 22 36 - - -

In his final season, Balderis was the leading goal scorer for the third time in his career. His 51 points was the 3rd highest total during the season.

3.2 International

3.2.1 1983 World Championships

The 1983 tournament all-star team tells the story quite well: Tretiak; Kasatonov-Fetisov; Krutov-Larionov-Makarov. The 5 man unit included the 5 best scorers of Soviet Union. Makarov had 18, Krutov 15, Larionov 12, Kasatonov 11 and Fetisov 10 points. Once again Balderis was the leading secondary scorer of the Soviets with 9 points in 10 games and put up as many points as for example Marcel Dionne.

4 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

4.1 Domestic league

Scoring title x 2 (1977, 1983)
Most goals x 3 (1976, 1977, 1985)
Most assists (1983)

Balderis had very high peak. At his best, he could outscore even Makarov or Petrov. He was an effective player for 10 seasons, starting from 1974/75 and ending in 1985. For the most part of his career, Balderis played with lesser players and was capable of raising their point totals. He was a brilliant goalscorer. In addition to the goal scoring titles, he finished 2nd in 1975 and 1983. He was also capable of using his linemates. He was 2nd in assists in 1980, second only to Makarov.

4.2 International

All-star team (1977)
Leading goal-scorer (1978)

Balderis’ international resume is a bit disappointing for a player with his Soviet league resume. He was never the best player in national team. He was always in a secondary scorer role. However, his career overlapped with both Petrov’s line and Larionov’s line. His most impressive international tournament was probably in 1977. In 1978 he was the leading goal scorer of the tournament along with Mikhailov and Dionne. But even if Balderis wasn’t the leading player on his team, he was almost always the best secondary scorer in the national team.

Overall, I think Balderis should be viewed as a step or two below Kharlamov, Mikhailov and Petrov. Maltsev probably had the better career of the two as well, mainly because his great international resume. However, Balderis has a fantastic skill set: he's known as perhaps the fastest Soviet skater ever, he was a great goal scorer and decent playmaker. He was also capable of elevating his linemates' level. I think this study reveals that Balderis has been undervalued to some extent up to this point in the ATD.

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03-27-2011, 12:30 AM
  #47
VanIslander
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Soviet League All-Star Selections

YearGDDLWCRW
1947Hariys MellupsVladimir NikanorovAlexander Vinogradov Zdenek ZikmundIvan NovikovYevgeny Babich
1948Hariys MellupsVladimir NikanorovAlexander Vinogradov Vsevolod BobrovAnatoli TarasovYevgeny Babich
1949Hariys MellupsVladimir NikanorovAlexander Vinogradov Ivan NovikovAlexey GuryshevYevgeny Babich
1950Hariys MellupsVladimir NikanorovAlexander Vinogradov Vsevolod BobrovVictor ShuvalovYevgeny Babich
1951Grigory MkrtychanNikolai SologubovAlexander Vinogradov Vsevolod BobrovVictor ShuvalovYevgeny Babich
1952Grigory MkrtychanNikolai SologubovAlexander VinogradovVsevolod BobrovVictor ShuvalovYevgeny Babich
1953Grigory MkrtychanNikolai SologubovAlfred KuchevskyAlexander UvarovVictor ShuvalovYevgeny Babich
1954Nikolaï PuchkovDmitry UkolovAlfred KuchevskyVsevolod BobrovVictor ShuvalovYevgeny Babich
1955Nikolaï PuchkovNikolai SologubovIvan TregubovVsevolod BobrovAlexey GuryshevYevgeny Babich
1956Nikolaï PuchkovNikolai SologubovIvan TregubovVsevolod BobrovAlexey GuryshevYury Krylov
1957Nikolaï PuchkovNikolai SologubovIvan TregubovVsevolod BobrovAlexey GuryshevKonstantin Loktev
1958 Nikolaï Puchkov Ivan Tregubov Mikhaïl Ryzhov Venyamin Aleksandrov Vladimir Elizarov Konstantin Loktev
1959 Nikolaï Puchkov Nikolaï Sologubov Genrikh Sidorenkov Konstantin Loktev Evgueni Groshev Boris Maïorov
1960 Nikolaï Puchkov Alfred Kuchevsky Genrikh Sidorenkov Evgueni Groshev Venyamin Aleksandrov Konstantin Loktev
1961 Vladimir Chirnov Aleksandr Ragulin Genrikh Sidorenkov Aleksandr Almetov Oleg Korolenko Yuri Paramoshkin
1962 Nikolaï Puchkov Aleksandr Ragulin Vitali Davydov Aleksandr Almetov Evgueni Groshev Boris Maïorov
1963 Viktor Konovalenko Aleksandr Ragulin Eduard Ivanov Aleksandr Almetov Vyacheslav Starshinov Vladimir Yurzinov
1964 Viktor Konovalenko Aleksandr Ragulin Eduard Ivanov Viktor Yakushev Vyacheslav Starshinov Anatoli Firsov
1965 Viktor Konovalenko Viktor Kuzkin Eduard Ivanov Viktor Yakushev Vyacheslav Starshinov Konstantin Loktev
1966 1st Viktor Konovalenko Vitali Davydov Aleksandr Ragulin Anatoli Firsov Vyacheslav Starshinov Venyamin Aleksandrov
1966 2nd Viktor Zinger Eduard Ivanov Viktor Kuzkin Boris Maïorov Aleksandr Almetov Konstantin Loktev
1966 3rd Valeri Zubarev Oleg Zaïtsev Vladimir Brejnev Yuri Moïseïev Viktor Yakushev Vladimir Vikulov
1967 1st Viktor Konovalenko Vitali Davydov Aleksandr Ragulin Anatoli Firsov Vyacheslav Starshinov Boris Maïorov
1967 2nd Viktor Zinger Oleg Zaïtsev Viktor Kuzkin Venyamin Aleksandrov Viktor Polupanov Vladimir Vikulov
1967 3rd Viktor Tolmachev Eduard Ivanov Valeri Nikitin Aleksandr Yakushev Aleksandr Almetov Viktor Yaroslavtsev
1968 1st Viktor Konovalenko Vitali Davydov Aleksandr Ragulin Anatoli Firsov Vyacheslav Starshinov Venyamin Aleksandrov
1968 2nd Viktor Zinger Igor Romishevsky Viktor Kuzkin Boris Maïorov Viktor Polupanov Vladimir Vikulov
1968 3rd Boris Zaïtsev Oleg Zaïtsev Viktor Blinov Igor Grigoriev Anatoli Ionov Evgueni Zimin
1969 1st Viktor Zinger Vitali Davydov Aleksandr Ragulin Anatoli Firsov Vyacheslav Starshinov Boris Mikhaïlov
1969 2nd Viktor Puchkov Igor Romishevsky Viktor Kuzkin Valeri Kharlamov Vladimir Petrov Vladimir Vikulov
1969 3rd Nikolaï Tolstikov Evgueni Poladiev Aleksandr Sapelkin Boris Maïorov Aleksandr Maltsev Evgueni Zimin
1970 1st Viktor Konovalenko Vitali Davydov Evgueni Poladiev Vyacheslav Starshinov Aleksandr Maltsev Vladimir Vikulov
1971 1st Vladislav Tretiak Vladimir Lutchenko Viktor Kuzkin Valeri Kharlamov Aleksandr Maltsev Vladimir Vikulov
1971 2nd Vladimir Shepovalov Vitali Davydov Guennadi Tsygankov Anatoli Firsov Vladimir Petrov Boris Mikhaïlov
1971 3rd Viktor Zinger Igor Romishevsky Aleksandr Ragulin Aleksandr Syrtsov Evgueni Mishakov Evgueni Zimin
1972 1st Vladislav Tretiak Vladimir Lutchenko Aleksandr Ragulin Valeri Kharlamov Aleksandr Maltsev Vladimir Vikulov
1973 1st Vladislav Tretiak Vladimir Lutchenko Valeri Vassiliev Valeri Kharlamov Vladimir Petrov Boris Mikhaïlov
1973 2nd Aleksandr Sidelnikov Aleksandr Gusev Guennadi Tsygankov Aleksandr Yakushev Vladimir Shadrin Aleksandr Maltsev
1973 3rd Viktor Krivolapov Yuri Liapkin Aleksandr Ragulin Aleksandr Volchkov Vyacheslav Anisin Aleksandr Martyniuk
1974 Vladislav Tretiak Vladimir Lutchenko Valeri Vassiliev Valeri Kharlamov Aleksandr Maltsev Boris Mikhaïlov
1975 Vladislav Tretiak Valeri Vassiliev Vladimir Lutchenko Valeri Kharlamov Vladimir Petrov Boris Mikhaïlov
1976 Vladislav Tretiak Valeri Vassiliev Vladimir Lutchenko Aleksandr Yakushev Valeri Kharlamov Viktor Shalimov
1977 Vladislav Tretiak Valeri Vassiliev Vladimir Lutchenko Helmut Balderis Vladimir Petrov Boris Mikhaïlov
1978 Vladislav Tretiak Vyacheslav Fetisov Valeri Vassiliev Valeri Kharlamov Aleksandr Maltsev Boris Mikhaïlov
1979 Vladislav Tretiak Valeri Vassiliev Vassili Pervukhin Sergei Makarov Vladimir Petrov Boris Mikhaïlov
1980 Vladislav Tretiak Vyacheslav Fetisov Aleksei Kasatonov Sergei Makarov Aleksandr Maltsev A. Golikov
1981 Vladislav Tretiak Valeri Vassiliev Aleksei Kasatonov Sergueï Kapustin Aleksandr Maltsev Sergei Makarov
1982 Vladislav Tretiak Vyacheslav Fetisov Aleksei Kasatonov Vladimir Krutov Viktor Shalimov Sergei Makarov
1983 Vladislav Tretiak Vyacheslav Fetisov Aleksei Kasatonov Vladimir Krutov Igor Larionov Sergei Makarov
1984 Vladislav Tretiak Vyacheslav Fetisov Aleksei Kasatonov Vladimir Krutov Nikolaï Drozdetsky Sergei Makarov
1985 Vladimir Myshkin Vyacheslav Fetisov Aleksei Kasatonov Vladimir Krutov Anatoli Semenov Sergei Makarov
1986 Evgueni Belosheïkin Vyacheslav Fetisov Aleksei Kasatonov Vladimir Krutov Igor Larionov Sergei Makarov
1987 Evgueni Belosheïkin Vyacheslav Fetisov Aleksei Kasatonov Vladimir Krutov Igor Larionov Sergei Makarov
1988 Sergueï Mylnikov Vyacheslav Fetisov Aleksei Kasatonov Vladimir Krutov Igor Larionov Sergei Makarov
1989       
1990 Arturs Irbe Vladimir Konstantinov Mikhaïl Tatarinov Valeri Kamensky Vyacheslav Bykov Andrei Khomutov
1991 Aleksei Maryn Vladimir Konstantinov Evgueni Popikhin Valeri Kamensky Aleksandr Semak Pavel Bure

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03-27-2011, 02:37 AM
  #48
EagleBelfour
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http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1974/ussr/index.htm

Soviet MVP Results for the 1970's. You just need to click on the year.

Does anyone have the results for the 1980's?

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03-27-2011, 05:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EagleBelfour View Post
http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1974/ussr/index.htm

Soviet MVP Results for the 1970's. You just need to click on the year.

Does anyone have the results for the 1980's?
http://www.passionhockey.com/Archives.html

URSS 1980-81: Élection des meilleurs joueurs : 1 Vladislav Tretiak (CSKA) 158, 2 Aleksandr Maltsev (Dynamo) 121, 3 Sergueï Kapustin (Spartak) 53, 4 Sergueï Makarov (CSKA) 35, 5 Vladimir Petrov (CSKA) 28.

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03-27-2011, 08:54 AM
  #50
EagleBelfour
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BM67 View Post
http://www.passionhockey.com/Archives.html

URSS 1980-81: Élection des meilleurs joueurs : 1 Vladislav Tretiak (CSKA) 158, 2 Aleksandr Maltsev (Dynamo) 121, 3 Sergueï Kapustin (Spartak) 53, 4 Sergueï Makarov (CSKA) 35, 5 Vladimir Petrov (CSKA) 28.
thanks!

EDIT: There's some interesting stuff written in French on this website. Anyone that needs me to translate some of these can PM me


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