HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

Is it possible?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
12-31-2008, 05:28 PM
  #1
Twist and Shout
Registered User
 
Twist and Shout's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Country: Canada
Posts: 12,284
vCash: 500
Is it possible?

for a person in their mid-40s to learn to skate, start playing hockey and actually become a decent player?

People asked me similar questions in the past and I had always responded saying that it's never to late to start. However, over the holidays, I joined my uncle for his first skating experience at public skate (he is new to the country and wanted to skate with his kids as they were learning). He didn't fall down or anything, which surprised me, but he was skating pretty awkwardly which was understandable as he didn't learn a proper technique. 6 year old kids kept flying by him on skates which no doubt shouldn't have been good for the self confidence but after the session, he asked me if it was too late for him to get into hockey.

Truthfully, I didn't know what to tell him. I told him that I could find some skating classes for him to attend and when he could skate reasonably well, he could start playing in a lower level rec league and see how he progresses.

What would be the best course of action for an older newbie trying to get into the game? He's currently living around Whitby, Ontario if anyone has something specific that I could pass along to him. If it makes any difference, he is in good physical shape and exercises more than the average 48 year old.

Help is much appreciated, as well as first-hand accounts and experiences of anyone who had a late introduction to the game as players.

Twist and Shout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
12-31-2008, 06:13 PM
  #2
Reckless Abandon*
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Country: United States
Posts: 2,601
vCash: 500
If he practices enough, and can skate decently eventually I would say that it isn't too late.

Reckless Abandon* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-01-2009, 01:07 AM
  #3
wildebeest
 
wildebeest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Alton, IL
Country: United States
Posts: 165
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to wildebeest Send a message via MSN to wildebeest Send a message via Yahoo to wildebeest
as long as he doesn't mind falling down and is committed to learning, it's never too late.

wildebeest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-01-2009, 08:26 AM
  #4
pnewsom
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 59
vCash: 500
I started from nothing last spring, and I'm 54.

I bought skates, and soon was the weird guy a public skating trying to learn to do cross-overs in the middle of the rink.

I then enrolled in one of the Adult Dynamic Hockey Skills courses at the Bell Sensplex. There were others in the group like me, and we all learned a lot in ten weekly sessions. It is amazing how far you can progress in these programs!

I now try to skate or play at least three times a week, and I have since finished a second program and am ready to sign up for the next. Can't wait!
Will I become a good hockey player? It's doubtful, but I am not the worst in the group I play with, and I really enjoyed myself.

One word of caution, do not go cheap on the pants. I have had to deal with a nasty hip flexor injury over the last four or five months, due to repeated falls on the point of my hip on my weak side. A pair of Vapor 40 pants have eased that situation considerably.

The group that I initially started with, stayed together, and we play once a week at 7am. We're terrible, but everyone tries their hardest, and we have a lot of fun.

What a great game! I should have started when I was a kid.

pnewsom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-01-2009, 02:27 PM
  #5
noobman
Registered User
 
noobman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,636
vCash: 500
The fact that he's in great shape gives him a huge head start.

At that age you need proper instruction and lots of practice. If he doesn't mind putting in the time, and doesn't mind LEARNING something new then he can definitely do it.

Get your uncle to take some skating lessons (or teach him yourself if you're good enough!) and once he has his skating, you may consider getting him to do a hockey school and a rec league as opposed to two leagues.

noobman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-01-2009, 03:29 PM
  #6
JorgeRocks!
Registered User
 
JorgeRocks!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,445
vCash: 500
with practice almost anything can be achieved

JorgeRocks! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-01-2009, 04:38 PM
  #7
nullterm
Registered User
 
nullterm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Port Moody, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,558
vCash: 800
I just started at 30 and am having a blast playing in two beer leagues. If you really want todo it then don't let a few spills to the ice hold you back. Just brush it off and stand up with a smile knowing you're doing something you enjoy. Enjoy the journey, don't worry too much about the destination.

Take skating lessons so you know what todo. Once I had basic skating down, I took power skating. Helped immensely and the class itself was very fun.

nullterm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-01-2009, 04:53 PM
  #8
sharkticon
Registered User
 
sharkticon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Teal Town, CA
Country: United States
Posts: 736
vCash: 500
Anything is possible.


I just started playing a few years ago and i'm 30. there were people in the beginning class older than me (who i would guess are around 40+).

sharkticon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-01-2009, 05:12 PM
  #9
Twist and Shout
Registered User
 
Twist and Shout's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Country: Canada
Posts: 12,284
vCash: 500
I was at his house earlier today and he was already in the process of making a makeshift rink in front of his house (ahh, the joys of cold winters)!!! .. Turns out he searched for a guide at the library to help him with that. I showed him this thread and I could see that he really appreciates the support.

I thought that maybe I could find some videos on the technical aspects of skating for him. Anyone have any such links? I found a couple, and while there's probably only so much you can learn from videos, there has to be something worthwhile out there ...

I also found some beginner/intermediate skating lessons for him to start at the local rink in a couple of weeks. I really admire him and people like you guys who started late when they could have simply convinced themselves that it was too late and never given it a shot.

I suppose it truly is never too late to start -- might not be the best player on the ice, but as long as you can take a shift, enjoy yourself, and play your heart out there, that's all that matters!

Twist and Shout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-01-2009, 05:17 PM
  #10
nullterm
Registered User
 
nullterm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Port Moody, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,558
vCash: 800
Check out this thread for info on one of the most important aspects: stopping.

http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t=582244

Edit - and here's a video showing how to start out stopping.

http://www.expertvillage.com/video/1...ce-skating.htm


Last edited by nullterm: 01-01-2009 at 05:24 PM.
nullterm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-01-2009, 05:17 PM
  #11
87vert
 
87vert's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Country: United States
Posts: 230
vCash: 500
I just started skating a few weeks ago (Im 22) I watched a few videos on youtube that seemed to atleast help me get the basics down

87vert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-01-2009, 05:31 PM
  #12
sharkticon
Registered User
 
sharkticon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Teal Town, CA
Country: United States
Posts: 736
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Subway Schenn View Post
I was at his house earlier today and he was already in the process of making a makeshift rink in front of his house (ahh, the joys of cold winters)!!! .. Turns out he searched for a guide at the library to help him with that. I showed him this thread and I could see that he really appreciates the support.
I think "searching for a guide at the library" shows his age more than anything.

Perhaps you could show him the "internet."

http://www.instructables.com/id/Make..._skating_rink/

sharkticon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-01-2009, 06:50 PM
  #13
RobertKron
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 8,774
vCash: 500
I've played drop-in and whatnot with lots of guys who didn't get started until their 40s. They're fine, and they have tons of fun, which is the most important thing. I mean, yeah, the guys who played junior or college or pro can turn them inside out, but that stands for most players, regardless of when they started on skates.

I mean, really, at the end of the day, recreational hockey is just about getting out there, getting some icetime, and having fun. If he's willing to put some effort in to get himself started, more power to him.

RobertKron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-01-2009, 07:13 PM
  #14
wildebeest
 
wildebeest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Alton, IL
Country: United States
Posts: 165
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to wildebeest Send a message via MSN to wildebeest Send a message via Yahoo to wildebeest
Here's a really good set of videos on turning and stopping. The lady breaks down every single movement in slow-mo and regular speed and explains them all really well. It helped with my weak-ass backwards crossovers a ton.

wildebeest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-01-2009, 07:22 PM
  #15
BadHammy*
MSL For Hart!
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Right Behind Me!
Posts: 10,444
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildebeest View Post
Here's a really good set of videos on turning and stopping. The lady breaks down every single movement in slow-mo and regular speed and explains them all really well. It helped with my weak-ass backwards crossovers a ton.
Thank you very much for those videos. I have been playing inline only, there is almost no ice where I live now, and my ice skills have certainly gone to crap. But anyway, for someone who is 40 or 50 and learning hockey from scratch, the key to remember is it takes even the most naturally skilled player 2 or 3 years of nonstop hard work to get good. It is very hard and will consume your whole life, but it's worth it.

BadHammy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-01-2009, 07:40 PM
  #16
IniNew
 
IniNew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Keller
Country: United States
Posts: 337
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildebeest View Post
Here's a really good set of videos on turning and stopping. The lady breaks down every single movement in slow-mo and regular speed and explains them all really well. It helped with my weak-ass backwards crossovers a ton.
Those videos were amazing, thank you for posting them!

IniNew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-01-2009, 10:44 PM
  #17
Twist and Shout
Registered User
 
Twist and Shout's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Country: Canada
Posts: 12,284
vCash: 500
Cheers for those links .. Extremely helpful - I'll pass them along. Might use them to improve my technique as well as I'm not the most technical skater.

One of the areas he realized he was struggling in considerably in the 2-3 times he went to public skating is backwards skating (which he can't do at all even though he was apparently trying really hard). Difficult to explain backwards skating without a visual aid so hopefully he can start making some progress with these videos.

Twist and Shout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-01-2009, 10:57 PM
  #18
slamigo
Skate or Die!
 
slamigo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ottawa
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,244
vCash: 500
get him to get some gear. At least elbow pads, helmet and pants.You can get ref style pants that don't really look like hockey pants but have tailbone and hip protection.
You can't really progress skating if you won't leave your comfort zone because you don't want to get hurt. Wearing protective equipment will give him the confidence to find his edges without worrying about breaking your azz.

slamigo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-02-2009, 02:20 AM
  #19
nullterm
Registered User
 
nullterm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Port Moody, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,558
vCash: 800
Knee and elbow pads at the very least. And hockey gloves since he wants to play hockey anyways.

I emphasize knee pads. Mine have taken a bit of a beating through the learning process.

nullterm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
01-03-2009, 09:38 PM
  #20
NJDevs430
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 1,905
vCash: 500
Agree with all of the above (especially about the padding).
Wish your uncle good luck from those of us who've started late in life!
}:-)>

NJDevs430 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:54 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2015 All Rights Reserved.