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Hockey stop on rollers?

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Old
01-22-2009, 10:28 PM
  #1
dirtydevs9
 
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Hockey stop on rollers?

I was just wondering how you guys hockey stop/stop on a dime in roller hockey..i've been trying to do a basic hockey stop but it's not working.

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01-22-2009, 10:32 PM
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nullterm
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Never figured it out myself either. Usually do a turn stop or slalom to slow down.

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01-23-2009, 02:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nullterm View Post
Never figured it out myself either. Usually do a turn stop or slalom to slow down.
Only way I've figured out as well.

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01-23-2009, 02:28 AM
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I learned how to do it when I was little.

I would watch ice hockey players stop, and I figured, in my uneducated youth, why shouldn't I be able to do the exact same thing on roller skates?

Well, I tried my next game, and it worked. Been doing it ever since I was six. So, just try to copy an ice stop.

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01-23-2009, 08:42 AM
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Synergy27
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http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t...highlight=stop

See my post, #10.

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01-23-2009, 11:48 AM
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When you say sharp turn, you mean just leaning towards where I want to turn on my skates?

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01-23-2009, 12:09 PM
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What kind of surface do you play on?

I worked as a skate guard at an indoor skating rink with a wood surface when I was younger, and I was able to hockey stop when I got the right wheels. I used hyper racing wheels- they are kind of pricy, but worth it. I think its just the hardness of the wheel that helped...and they are kind of sticky which helps with grip. You can't use them on asphalt though because it will rip them apart.

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01-23-2009, 12:43 PM
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Synergy27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 24godard View Post
When you say sharp turn, you mean just leaning towards where I want to turn on my skates?
I literally mean that stopping on roller blades is just making the sharpest turn pysically possible, for me at least. Your body does everything it does while it's turning: transfer weight to the leg in the direction you want to go, turn your foot in that direction, reverse your momentum, etc., except that your turn so sharply that all of you momentum is used up.

Just try it a couple of times. Build up some speed and make a sharp turn. Do it again but make your turn sharper, and sharper, and sharper. Eventually you'll reach a point where you feel like you're probably going to fall down. Once you are able to balance yourself at that point and not fall, you'll have stopped. Also, the above poster is correct in that wheel hardness plays a role. This is easier to do with a harder wheel because they'll slide a bit more, but it can (and should) be learned with a wheel that has a durometer appropriate for the surface you are playing on.

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01-23-2009, 12:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Synergy27 View Post
I literally mean that stopping on roller blades is just making the sharpest turn pysically possible, for me at least. Your body does everything it does while it's turning: transfer weight to the leg in the direction you want to go, turn your foot in that direction, reverse your momentum, etc., except that your turn so sharply that all of you momentum is used up.

Just try it a couple of times. Build up some speed and make a sharp turn. Do it again but make your turn sharper, and sharper, and sharper. Eventually you'll reach a point where you feel like you're probably going to fall down. Once you are able to balance yourself at that point and not fall, you'll have stopped. Also, the above poster is correct in that wheel hardness plays a role. This is easier to do with a harder wheel because they'll slide a bit more, but it can (and should) be learned with a wheel that has a durometer appropriate for the surface you are playing on.
wear a helmet when yer learning this one, making erratic turns can cause a few heel over head slip outs, last thing you want is to be concussed

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01-23-2009, 02:28 PM
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thanks. loads of help

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01-24-2009, 06:37 PM
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Do it like a normal ice stop, with outside/inside edges except be prepared to turn in slightly.

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01-24-2009, 08:38 PM
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thanks but i dont play ice

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01-26-2009, 12:06 AM
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BabaSundin
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i just do a really big sharp turn
usually when i try doing a hockey type stop it hurts my ankles alot

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01-26-2009, 03:47 AM
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lol

I think they have breaks, aren't those fast enough for you? XD

Don't try and stop, you will destroy your knee, it isn't like ice hockey, this is a weird knee jerking stop, you will want to thank me for giving you this advice, and in turn sparing your knee from total annihilation.

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01-26-2009, 07:37 AM
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I could do it by turning both feet to the side and jumping., not overly dissimilar to a skate stop.

Of course, I wasn't going downhill or overly fast when I tried it....

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01-26-2009, 01:49 PM
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Synergy27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vorkon View Post
Negative, If he is using using inline hockey skates there will be no back brake, also you can hockey stop fine on inlines without blowing apart your knees.

Its going to come down to a number of minor things that will add up and either be a solution or problem.

1) Wheel hardness for the surface you are using. (Asphalt, Spider court, etc...)
2) Balance point of the Inline Chasiss you are on (Hi-Lo, vangaurd, sprungs, Tri-D, etc...)
3) Wheel order for grippyness and weight, Revison Wheels has a pretty good chart.

When I first was learning I was coming off of 10+ years of playing Ice Hockey, where for me i had a forward profile on my blades where my pivot point was right by the balls of my feet (in between where the 1st/2nd wheel would be), Coming over to inline this was fine for turning and everything but no matter how I tried I would only cut into tight turns and not slide into stops. I learned using a tri-d set-up for me that my balance point for stopping was actually right infront of my heel. So once I got used to kicking my heel out into slides I could stop but momentum would flop me forward off my feet. Talking to people, I found that the wheels I was using were too grippy for the surface I was using, Swapped to different wheels and I could slide into stops all I wanted, but not quick enough.

So looking further into wheels, I found the Revision Wheel matrix which had some suggestions for types of wheels based on weight, on my outside wheels I put in grippy types and the interior wheels I use speed/not as grippy. So now once I am in a slide i push forward a tad and the front wheel will bite and stop me. I can pretty much stop on a dime at this point, there may be some slide on my weak side.

Once I started playing with wheel types and where I was balancing on the Tri-D it came pretty quickly and had stopping under control in about 2 weeks. I am now on a Sprung all 76mm setup, and had to move my balance point forward again, and twist more on the 2nd wheel instead of the 3rd/4th.

But figuring out the wheels was the biggest thing that I think people over look, I would also suggest wearing a helmet and hip protection when learning as you will likely fall some.

Long winded I know, but I hope it helps some, Ive only been playing Inline for about 6 months now, but the Ice basics for the most part still apply, just need to fine tune things.
This is all great advice.

I communicated with the OP over PM a bit and found out that he isn't using hockey skates, and whatever he is using has an all 80mm setup (I'm guessing they're racing or XC skates of some sort). It doesn't take an advanced physics degree to figure out what's going on with wheels, but it definitely requires a little thought and a basic understanding of the machines you are strapping to your feet. Big wheels = fast. Small wheels = agility. Since you need both of these things to play hockey, obviously something middle of the road, or better yet (imo) a combination of both such as a Hi-Lo setup is what you need to be your best.

You definitely cannot overlook durometer/surface matching, though. I can skate on anything with anything, but once you know the difference that a proper setup makes, you'll want to do it right. Also, how well maintained the rink is also plays a significant role. Roller rinks don't have Zambonis like ice rinks do, and unless the people caring for the rink clean it regularly, the build up of sweat/dirt/dust/spit/whatever can seriously affect the grippiness of the surface.

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Old
01-26-2009, 02:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Synergy27 View Post
This is all great advice.

I communicated with the OP over PM a bit and found out that he isn't using hockey skates, and whatever he is using has an all 80mm setup (I'm guessing they're racing or XC skates of some sort). It doesn't take an advanced physics degree to figure out what's going on with wheels, but it definitely requires a little thought and a basic understanding of the machines you are strapping to your feet. Big wheels = fast. Small wheels = agility. Since you need both of these things to play hockey, obviously something middle of the road, or better yet (imo) a combination of both such as a Hi-Lo setup is what you need to be your best.

You definitely cannot overlook durometer/surface matching, though. I can skate on anything with anything, but once you know the difference that a proper setup makes, you'll want to do it right. Also, how well maintained the rink is also plays a significant role. Roller rinks don't have Zambonis like ice rinks do, and unless the people caring for the rink clean it regularly, the build up of sweat/dirt/dust/spit/whatever can seriously affect the grippiness of the surface.
i spent 5 seasons playing roller hockey in the off season that this part is very important. its hard to anticipate how slick the surface will be because almost no arena has the surface cleaned. if you can, get a test lap in before a game to guage how slick it is and try taking a damp towel to the wheels to try and dry them out a little bit or use something to make it a bit slicker if its too sticky(i beleive one of my ex-teammates used rub a little bit of wd40 or something of the sort with a towel on his wheels).

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