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Can't Hockey stop

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Old
01-22-2009, 05:44 PM
  #1
WickedWrister
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Can't Hockey stop

I can skate alright, backwards, turning, alright speed but I can't "hockey stop" I am forced to do a T-stop to slow down. Maybe my skates are too big (I'm a size 10.5) and my skates are Nike Bauer 8's. Anyway, whenever I try to hockeystop I just end up turning instead of stopping. Do I have to jump or what? Anyone have some tips?

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01-22-2009, 05:49 PM
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Gunnar Stahl 30
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stagger your feet, and if you are stopping to the right, your right skate uses the outside blade to stop and your left foot uses the inside blade and lean all of your weight into it

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01-22-2009, 06:00 PM
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nullterm
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Check this thread, should help you out.

http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t=582244

It's about scraping the ice surface to generate snow. Once you have that, the rest is much easier.

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01-22-2009, 06:28 PM
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SSM12
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Stand by the boards(benches not with glass) and push your self out then slowly pull yourself in and bend your knees and turn your hips. Holding on gives you support, until you feel comfortable with the motion. Once you feel comfortable and it FEELS like you are scraping the ice, get off the wall and go slowly. A lot of people like to go towards the boards just in case, but if I were you I would go slowly to the blue line, stop, then slowly to the red, stop, back to the blue, stop, wash rinse repeat.

once you get the motion down while hanging to the boards, your confidence will rise. I did that to learn on my left side and within 2 stick and pucks I had it down and now some 4 months later, i feel really good on that side, stopping and making quick cuts.

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01-22-2009, 06:58 PM
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DevilsFan38
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If you're having problems scraping the ice (ie, it feels like your blade "sticks" in the ice rather than slides across it) maybe you could try a shallower hollow on your skates. I had real problems trying to stop, and I found out that my hollow was way too deep (5/16!) - I switched to a 1/2 and that has made things much better. I still need to practice, but I no longer feel like my blades dig in so hard and fast that I'll fall over. That may not be an issue with you, but if other things fail you could give it a try.

Another thought, and this is more mental than anything else: think of it as a hockey slide, rather than a hockey stop. You're not going to come to a complete stop as soon as you start it, instead you slide across the ice a bit (which can be a bit disconcerting at first, at least it was to me).

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01-22-2009, 07:02 PM
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vivianmb
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find a slick floor in your house( ie linoleum,or tile,or hardwood).
put wool socks on.
run acroos the floor and hockey stop in your socks.
train your muscles to do the motion. and learn to shift your weight.
it may sound dumb, but this (and skating obviously) is how we taught our boys to stop. they are 5 and 7 and both can spray snow with their "hockey" stops.

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01-22-2009, 08:34 PM
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CloudReader
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I had the same problem as you because i learned how to skate on rollerblades. Right now, I'm taking basic skating lessons, and this is what the instructor told me to do, and it worked perfectly for me on the first try:

-bend your knees
-keep your legs and skates together
-swivel your body 90 degrees while keeping your legs together

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01-22-2009, 08:50 PM
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nullterm
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I was in the same boat. But I found it was easier to master scraping with one foot doing a 1/2 snow plow. Once you have the feeling of doing it with the one lead foot, then getting the second back foot in it is easy.

See the link to the thread I posted.

Though great point about keeping your knees bent.

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01-23-2009, 12:24 AM
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I did the snowplow and learned how to hockey stop.

I skated and gained as much speed as i could. Did the snowplow and pivoted my body side to side so you could generate snow with both skates. Once i got comfortable, i started pivoting more and more until i could stop on the inside edge of each skate.

Outside edge stopping (nhl players do that when they come to the bench) is a lot more difficult. I basically force my self to stop on my outside edge only when i went to the bench, it took me a while but i can now stop on all four edges.

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02-12-2009, 01:18 PM
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WickedWrister
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I've skated about 7 times on ice and no progess... help?

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02-12-2009, 01:31 PM
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NYRSinceBirth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WickedWrister View Post
I've skated about 7 times on ice and no progess... help?
Keep at it. If I'm told to go to a line, I can't do it. But if I'm playing, I just do it automatically. Don't over think it. Practice one side at a time making snow. do it faster and faster, adding more lean and trying to stop in shorter times. Work the other foot in when you feel comfortable.

The key is to get used to the feeling of scraping/making snow, once you get that threshold, you'll know what to feel for when you try to stop.

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02-12-2009, 02:18 PM
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EmptyNetter
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Outside edge stopping (nhl players do that when they come to the bench) is a lot more difficult. I basically force my self to stop on my outside edge only when i went to the bench, it took me a while but i can now stop on all four edges.
Outside edge of your back foot? I can't imagine a situation I'd stop with the outside edge of my front foot -- too much risk of rolling your ankle. Can you explain, please?

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02-12-2009, 02:20 PM
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Gunnar Stahl 30
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Originally Posted by EmptyNetter View Post
Outside edge of your back foot? I can't imagine a situation I'd stop with the outside edge of my front foot -- too much risk of rolling your ankle. Can you explain, please?
i think he meant inside edge

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02-12-2009, 02:40 PM
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TheOtter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar Stahl 30 View Post
i think he meant inside edge
I think he meant outside edge of his back foot. I see pros doing that on the way to the bench, too. So by "all four edges," I'd guess he's talking about inside edge of front foot and outside edge of back foot facing to the left or to the right (2 edges for each direction, not all 4 for each direction).

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02-12-2009, 02:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtter View Post
I think he meant outside edge of his back foot. I see pros doing that on the way to the bench, too. So by "all four edges," I'd guess he's talking about inside edge of front foot and outside edge of back foot facing to the left or to the right (2 edges for each direction, not all 4 for each direction).
how can he use his outside edge on his back foot and inside on his front foot?

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02-12-2009, 03:08 PM
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EmptyNetter
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Originally Posted by WickedWrister View Post
I've skated about 7 times on ice and no progess... help?
Okay, so you can turn but you can't stop. Your skate blades will tend to follow a continuous path like a train stays on tracks. If your toes point left you'll tend to turn left. When you try to stop you're going to make your heels jump the tracks.

1. Skate toward the blue line -- it's good to pick a visual point to stop so you can mentally prepare yourself. Bend your knees and keep your feet about shoulder width apart or wider.
2. When you stop you'll pivot on the balls of your feet -- your heels lift off the ice enough so you twist 90-degrees and then dig them into the ice.
3. The rest you should know already. Keep your shoulders pointed straight ahead and quickly twist your hips to the left (for your right foot to be in front). Lean back so your weight's on your back leg and the inside edge of your right skate shaves the ice surface.

It's a lot to think of at once. Would be nice if you could jump and turn like you mentioned but I think your skate blades would dig in too deep to the ice and send you hurtling face forward.

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02-12-2009, 05:02 PM
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TheOtter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar Stahl 30 View Post
how can he use his outside edge on his back foot and inside on his front foot?
If you turn to the right, then the typical hockey stop (with both feet) uses the inside edge of your left (front) skate and outside edge of your right (back) skate. At least those are the terms as I understand them.

When I hear someone say they can stop using all four edges, I assume they mean they can use one or both of those two edges, facing in either direction. I.e., they have enough balance and control to use the trailing edge of either skate (inside of the front or outside of the back).

I could be wrong, of course!

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02-12-2009, 05:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtter View Post
If you turn to the right, then the typical hockey stop (with both feet) uses the inside edge of your left (front) skate and outside edge of your right (back) skate. At least those are the terms as I understand them.

When I hear someone say they can stop using all four edges, I assume they mean they can use one or both of those two edges, facing in either direction. I.e., they have enough balance and control to use the trailing edge of either skate (inside of the front or outside of the back).

I could be wrong, of course!
I believe you have it backwards. Stopping with your left foot forward would use the outside of edge of the left skate, and the inside edge of the right skate. Stopping on all four edges means you can stop either direction, thus alternating the edges you use.

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02-12-2009, 05:30 PM
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Gunnar Stahl 30
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I believe you have it backwards. Stopping with your left foot forward would use the outside of edge of the left skate, and the inside edge of the right skate. Stopping on all four edges means you can stop either direction, thus alternating the edges you use.
yea, thats how i took it. you obviously cant stop on all 4 edges at teh same time, and i think he messed up his "outside" with "inside"

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02-12-2009, 06:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WickedWrister View Post
I can skate alright, backwards, turning, alright speed but I can't "hockey stop" I am forced to do a T-stop to slow down. Maybe my skates are too big (I'm a size 10.5) and my skates are Nike Bauer 8's. Anyway, whenever I try to hockeystop I just end up turning instead of stopping. Do I have to jump or what? Anyone have some tips?
The way I tought my kid to "Hockey" stop was:

I had him skate forward and build just a little bit of speed and then I had him turn in one toe to stop then as time progressed he would turn in both toes when stopping doing what resembled the snowplow on skis.
As time progressed he found his dominant foot and that became his back foot for the "Hockey" stop.

Since then he started playing goal and has unlearned most of the skating and "hockey" stop stuff.

Now he keeps both skates on the Ice at all times C-cutting, T-pushing, and doing up / downs.

My father who has played allot more hockey than I when he was a kid still can't hockey stop so no worries eh.

try the snowplow trick it works and takes less time than it sounds.

I just talked to the kid and we figured out that the first toe you turn in will be the less dominant foot and that will be the direction you turn to stop at first. (the direction the first toe is pointing) your stops should look like this.

skate blades / \ make sure your knees are over your toes and butt is down.

Skate progression for my son: / | then, / \ Then, / / and stopped.


Last edited by adaminnj: 02-12-2009 at 06:23 PM. Reason: to add more info.
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02-12-2009, 08:24 PM
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TheOtter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IniNew View Post
I believe you have it backwards. Stopping with your left foot forward would use the outside of edge of the left skate, and the inside edge of the right skate. Stopping on all four edges means you can stop either direction, thus alternating the edges you use.
I think I see where we're disconnecting here. When I say my "front" skate, I'm thinking of the skate that leads in the direction I'm traveling, not the skate that I put "in front" of the other, heal to toe. So, if I stop to the right, I'm thinking of the left skate as my "front" skate, since it's ahead of me in the direction I was going, and my right skate as my "back" skate. So, in a turn/stop to the right, I'm on the inside edge of my left skate and the outside edge of my right skate.

Now I'm thinking that some of you have been talking about the right skate as the "front" skate in a stop facing to the right... yes/no?


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02-12-2009, 08:28 PM
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Originally Posted by IniNew View Post
I believe you have it backwards. Stopping with your left foot forward would use the outside of edge of the left skate, and the inside edge of the right skate.
Actually it's the other way around. Left foot forward means you use the inside edge of your left skate. When you lean back the outside edge lifts off the ice and it's the inside edge that shaves the ice.

I drew a picture!



Last edited by EmptyNetter: 02-12-2009 at 08:44 PM.
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Old
02-12-2009, 08:52 PM
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Gunnar Stahl 30
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good picture

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02-12-2009, 08:57 PM
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The more you skate, the easier it will be. I couldn't do a hockey stop well for my first couple years, then it sort of came to me.

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02-12-2009, 10:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WickedWrister View Post
I've skated about 7 times on ice and no progess... help?
One of the things you have to remember about hockey is that 80% of it is balance. If you stand up straight, the center of gravity is up at your chest, this means that you are top heavy and you have a better chance of falling.

This is why, when we tell our kids that come skating for the first time, we tell them to bend their knees. This bending of the knees gives you a lower center of gravity.

Now, as hockey players, we would like for you (the skater) to keep your knees bent at 90 degrees for balance and maximum stride length.

When you are going to get ready to stop, you have your kness bent. Just when you are ready to stop, you stand up, allowing the center of gravity to shift to your chest. In the process of standing up, you are turning at the same time, with this one legged snow plow that was mentioned in this thread.

By standing up, you move the center of gravity to your chest, turn and then bend your knees. The slower you bring that center of gravity down to your knees, the slower you stop. The faster you bring that center of gravity down, the faster you stop. Which means; The faster you bend your knees, the faster you will stop! Get it!

I would recommend slower at first, then once you get use to stopping, then you can stop with gusto. Please make sure that you learn how to stop in both direction. Don't favor one side over the other.

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