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Samsung 3D Monitor

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01-31-2009, 02:45 AM
  #1
Have My Baby Pierre
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Samsung 3D Monitor

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applicati...904&CatId=2775

Apparently it works for many games out right now...but who knows how it looks (I've heard it works awesome with Left 4 Dead). What interests me is that this monitor is 120hz, while all other lcds max out at 75. I'd love to test it out, you can definitely notice the difference between 75/120hz on certain games...which is why many "pro" gamers still use crt monitors.

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01-31-2009, 03:42 AM
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Metallian*
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucky #13 View Post
while all other lcds max out at 75.
all new tvs have been phasing in 120hz for a while now; consensus is you cant tell the difference

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01-31-2009, 02:54 PM
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Have My Baby Pierre
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rattlehead View Post
all new tvs have been phasing in 120hz for a while now; consensus is you cant tell the difference
That's because they aren't truly 120hz (most anyway), this samsung pc monitor is true 120hz and it's a pretty significant difference in some games playing with 75 fps compared to 120. Games are soo smooth on my crt with 120hz but on my lcd you can notice it's a little choppier, especially if you turn in game. Of course I still use my lcd because my crt takes up wayyy too much space and I'm not a pro gamer so it's not a big deal.

I even notice a difference when I changed my lcd refresh rate from 60 to 75.


Last edited by Have My Baby Pierre: 01-31-2009 at 03:00 PM.
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01-31-2009, 02:57 PM
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znk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rattlehead View Post
all new tvs have been phasing in 120hz for a while now; consensus is you cant tell the difference
That's wrong. The difference is obvious especially when the camera is panning.

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01-31-2009, 03:26 PM
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01-31-2009, 03:35 PM
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Originally Posted by znk View Post
That's wrong. The difference is obvious especially when the camera is panning.
....so all professionals out there giving reviews are wrong?

it's a negligible difference at best

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01-31-2009, 04:28 PM
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Kitten Mittons
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Is there a video to see the difference?

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02-01-2009, 12:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rattlehead View Post
....so all professionals out there giving reviews are wrong?

it's a negligible difference at best
http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-6449_7-6792632-1.html
Quote:
3. Anti-judder can have a major impact on picture quality. The smoother is designed to eliminate judder in film-based content, which is most noticeable in scenes that incorporate slow camera pans or in scenes shot with a handheld camera. We mainly looked at the effects of engaging the Sony's anti-judder, which has two settings: standard and high. Even at the lower setting (standard), the difference in the picture was immediately apparent. The image just looks more stable. Kick it up to high and everything becomes rock solid--it's night and day. However, the high setting tends to introduce artifacts into the picture. These look like a little tear or glitch in the picture. They appear for just a fraction of second, but they are noticeable. It's worth noting that the picture on the standard setting sometimes looks unnatural, too, particularly when the anti-judder suddenly kicks in during a fast pan and stabilizes objects moving across the screen.
http://gizmodo.com/gadgets/home-ente...ter-231872.php
Quote:
120Hz HDTVs: The Secret to Making Movies Look as Smooth as Butter
http://www.hdtvprofessor.com/HDTVAlmanac/?p=477
Quote:
Most LCD panels refresh the image 60 times a second. This is fast enough to eliminate any image flicker for most viewers. The problem is that the liquid crystal molecules take time to react to the electrical charges in each cell, and you can get motion blurring between frames. By writing the image to the screen twice as often — 120 times per second – it causes the liquid crystals to respond faster, and motion blur is decreased.

Many LCD TV manufacturers are also pulsing the backlight in sync with the image refresh rate. For those of you who are into the club scene (or who remember the disco days), you are familiar with the “freeze frame” effect of a strobe light. Flashing the light freezes the image, further reducing motion blur.

As a result, some LCD HDTVs with 120 Hz refresh rate create fast moving images that look nearly as sharp as a CRT, which still is the gold standard for smooth motion on the screen. Most viewers would have a difficult time telling the difference between the two.

There’s also one added benefit to 120 Hz. Some devices — such as some Blu-ray DVD players — now put out 1080p signals at 24 frames per second (fps) instead of the typical 30 fps. This slower speed matches the rate of film used in movies. Until now, the 24 frames have had to be shuffled in order to fit the 30 fps used by standard video signals. The solution is an awkward stutter-step called “3:2 pulldown” which involves taking three images of the first frame, and then interleaving them with two images of the next frame, and then three of the next. This can result in an artifact that results in jerky motion that has been dubbed “judder“. The advantage of a 120 Hz refresh rate is that it handles the 30 fps of standard video easily — just show each frame four times — as well as film’s 24 fps; show each frame five times. The fact that it is an even multiple of both rates makes for less video processing and a better image quality.
Now where did you get your info that there was no difference?

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