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Help Needed: Right Winger

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Old
01-27-2009, 04:57 AM
  #1
Grind Line
 
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Help Needed: Right Winger

Hi,

I'm a rookie for a rec team in th UK. Only been learning to skate and play since late summer last year.
I've played in a couple of games with not much ice time as i'm not the strongest player.
Can anyone point out a few basics i should know about being a right winger?
Or anyone know a site that shows diagrams for face-offs etc?

Appreciate any help/advice.

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01-27-2009, 07:47 AM
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xstartxtodayx
 
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Welcome to the game of hockey. While these are not right wing/left wing specific they are a couple of tips for wingers in general...

On face offs, tie up your opposing winger in the neutral and offensive zone, be ready to break from him to get open if you win the face off or keep him from getting a pass if you lose the face off.
In the defensive zone you want to get to the point man to cover him if you lose the face off (but if the puck is in the circle you don't want to leave your opposing winger all alone if there's no d-man there so it's a situational judgement call), if the face off is in the far corner and you're lining up towards the center of the ice then let the defenseman cover their winger on the circle and you slide back towards center a bit so you can sprint out to the point man or sprint towards the far boards or up the middle for a break out.

Playing in the defensive zone, their point man is your responsibility as a winger so don't get stuck going too deep in your corners trying to help your d-man, you'd like to be between their pointman and the face off circle. If you see your d-man get the puck then try to get on the boards between the face off circle and blueline (all depends on the situation) so you can get a break out pass if they bang it around the boards (then you can try to chip it out of the zone to your center if all works out as planned), if it's in the far corner then try to angle up towards center ice and keep your stick on the ice looking for a pass, but always be ready to stop and go back if the opposition takes the puck away.

I don't know if any of that made sense, it's something that as a player playing for so long you don't really think about too much you just do it, but I'd suggest watching hockey games and really try to dissect what the players are doing on the ice in all situations.

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Old
01-27-2009, 11:58 AM
  #3
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thanks that has made sense.

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Old
01-27-2009, 01:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Steve View Post
Hi,

I'm a rookie for a rec team in th UK. Only been learning to skate and play since late summer last year.
I've played in a couple of games with not much ice time as i'm not the strongest player.
Can anyone point out a few basics i should know about being a right winger?
Or anyone know a site that shows diagrams for face-offs etc?

Appreciate any help/advice.
You should also consider whether or not you want to play the "off-wing." The off-wing means that your forehand is on the inside lane of the rink -- righty-shot plays LW and vice versa.

Playing the off-wing gives you the advantage of better shooting (inside forehand) and passing angles. Lots of goal scorers in the NHL play the off-wing.

One drawback is that you have to catch headman passes on your backhand.

Other than that, always try to be an option for your defensemen on a breakout of your zone.

Wing is a great position, enjoy it!

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01-27-2009, 01:36 PM
  #5
Gunnar Stahl 30
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dont feel like you are obligated to stay on teh right side of teh ice. if you are the first man in the zone, get to the puck whereever it is. the positions are more important in the defensive zone

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01-27-2009, 01:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xstartxtodayx View Post
Welcome to the game of hockey. While these are not right wing/left wing specific they are a couple of tips for wingers in general...

On face offs, tie up your opposing winger in the neutral and offensive zone, be ready to break from him to get open if you win the face off or keep him from getting a pass if you lose the face off.
In the defensive zone you want to get to the point man to cover him if you lose the face off (but if the puck is in the circle you don't want to leave your opposing winger all alone if there's no d-man there so it's a situational judgement call), if the face off is in the far corner and you're lining up towards the center of the ice then let the defenseman cover their winger on the circle and you slide back towards center a bit so you can sprint out to the point man or sprint towards the far boards or up the middle for a break out.

Playing in the defensive zone, their point man is your responsibility as a winger so don't get stuck going too deep in your corners trying to help your d-man, you'd like to be between their pointman and the face off circle. If you see your d-man get the puck then try to get on the boards between the face off circle and blueline (all depends on the situation) so you can get a break out pass if they bang it around the boards (then you can try to chip it out of the zone to your center if all works out as planned), if it's in the far corner then try to angle up towards center ice and keep your stick on the ice looking for a pass, but always be ready to stop and go back if the opposition takes the puck away.

I don't know if any of that made sense, it's something that as a player playing for so long you don't really think about too much you just do it, but I'd suggest watching hockey games and really try to dissect what the players are doing on the ice in all situations.

Solid advice. This is the type of knowledge that is tough to pick up if you've never played organized hockey.

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01-27-2009, 05:23 PM
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Here's some tips for playing forward in general that I learned, being a player that started in a rec league myself a few years ago:
-Do your best to always be moving. You get caught flat-footed in any situation it's going to be bad, keep your feet moving as much as possible and if it's not your feet at least be gliding, even if it's very slowly it makes for a quicker start.
-It's very hard when you're not great on your skates, but avoid becoming a stationary target for your defenseman. Also come back to your defenseman, even the best when it comes to outlet passes are going to turn it over or miss the forward often if you're forcing him to make an 80 foot pass everytime.
-Play your position. As already stated Wingers are meant to cover the points in the defensive zone. Be ready for the d-man to pinch into the slot, this is very popular in rec leagues as they catch wingers snoozing all the time. Do your best to be a reliable option for your defenseman if they want to wing it around the boards.

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Old
01-30-2009, 06:25 AM
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinkeric View Post
You should also consider whether or not you want to play the "off-wing." The off-wing means that your forehand is on the inside lane of the rink -- righty-shot plays LW and vice versa.

Playing the off-wing gives you the advantage of better shooting (inside forehand) and passing angles. Lots of goal scorers in the NHL play the off-wing.

One drawback is that you have to catch headman passes on your backhand.

Other than that, always try to be an option for your defensemen on a breakout of your zone.

Wing is a great position, enjoy it!
I've thought about the off wing seeing quite a few players do that. Probably be a good option once i've gotten a lot better.

Thanks to all who have given me advice. Really helpful.

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Old
02-01-2009, 06:50 AM
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xstartxtodayx View Post
Welcome to the game of hockey. While these are not right wing/left wing specific they are a couple of tips for wingers in general...

On face offs, tie up your opposing winger in the neutral and offensive zone, be ready to break from him to get open if you win the face off or keep him from getting a pass if you lose the face off.
In the defensive zone you want to get to the point man to cover him if you lose the face off (but if the puck is in the circle you don't want to leave your opposing winger all alone if there's no d-man there so it's a situational judgement call), if the face off is in the far corner and you're lining up towards the center of the ice then let the defenseman cover their winger on the circle and you slide back towards center a bit so you can sprint out to the point man or sprint towards the far boards or up the middle for a break out.

Playing in the defensive zone, their point man is your responsibility as a winger so don't get stuck going too deep in your corners trying to help your d-man, you'd like to be between their pointman and the face off circle. If you see your d-man get the puck then try to get on the boards between the face off circle and blueline (all depends on the situation) so you can get a break out pass if they bang it around the boards (then you can try to chip it out of the zone to your center if all works out as planned), if it's in the far corner then try to angle up towards center ice and keep your stick on the ice looking for a pass, but always be ready to stop and go back if the opposition takes the puck away.

I don't know if any of that made sense, it's something that as a player playing for so long you don't really think about too much you just do it, but I'd suggest watching hockey games and really try to dissect what the players are doing on the ice in all situations.

... best advice: try full stops!

Only kidding!

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Old
02-01-2009, 07:06 AM
  #10
night-timer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Steve View Post
Hi,

I'm a rookie for a rec team in th UK. Only been learning to skate and play since late summer last year.
I've played in a couple of games with not much ice time as i'm not the strongest player.
Can anyone point out a few basics i should know about being a right winger?
Or anyone know a site that shows diagrams for face-offs etc?

Appreciate any help/advice.

Some other advice that may help...

Firstly, even if I'm really stating the obvious here, don't be afraid to ask your team-mates for plenty of input, help and suggestions.

Practice flat-out fast sprint skating (Power Skating) - you'll need it on break outs.

Understand that wingers get cut off by being driven into/towards the boards. Look for the Centre (to pass to) or have some strategies for skating around anyone who is blocking your progress.

The game is easier when you are moving. But practice explosive starts from a stationary position, such as at face-offs or when receiving a pass from your defence.

Practice pivots and pivoting after receiving a puck from defence on a breakout.

Play defence now and then to force yourself to practice backward skating. Backward skating is harder than forwards and can be neglected for that very reason.

And.... pick goalies brains! Ask them what is the most difficult type of shot or deke to stop.

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