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Let's say you're god-awful at hockey. What do you do?

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Old
01-31-2009, 04:27 PM
  #51
EmptyNetter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by <Mr Jiggyfly> View Post
I eventually got so fed up with him that when he got the puck I would go down on one knee and just watch him.

He obviously noticed me and everyone on the other team was laughing a little when they skated past me... so after doing this a few times he finally passed to me and got the msg.

After that he became a passing machine...
Peer pressure is a wonderful thing.
Good advice. Chances are that the hot dogs are looking for attention. When they find it has the opposite effect they're likely to settle down and play as part of a team.

TH3 RIDDL3R,
You might want to try this and also make a big deal (thank him) over his bringing in the goalies. Get him on your side, treat him like a grownup and ask him if he'd consider being more of a playmaker. If all else fails consider playing without him and his goalie friends. You can always put up a shooter tutor or tip the nets on their sides. Even with goalies playing it won't be fun for anyone else if they never get to handle the puck.

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01-31-2009, 04:33 PM
  #52
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Hockey is 1% natural skill and 99% determination. I had one helluva time learning to skate as a kid around 10. I finally got good, then quit for a long while and had to basically start all over again 4 or 5 years ago. It's all a matter of effort, work hard on the ice and even harder off the ice! Give it a year or two and you'll get there.

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01-31-2009, 04:40 PM
  #53
octopi
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Originally Posted by fourthliner View Post
Hockey is 1% natural skill and 99% determination. I had one helluva time learning to skate as a kid around 10. I finally got good, then quit for a long while and had to basically start all over again 4 or 5 years ago. It's all a matter of effort, work hard on the ice and even harder off the ice! Give it a year or two and you'll get there.
I gave it 8 years, and am still probably the 50th millionth ranked adult player on earth.And when I was playing, I wanted nothing more than to be absolutly the best player ever. Sometimes there are just physical reasons why you can't go over a certain level. The skill set I have doesn't bother me, its just that finding the time and people to play with is somewhat difficult.

For the record, I also have a hard time with speed not only because my gait makes me push off differently, but I am also tiny. Well,by adult hockey player standards, anyways.I'm a 5'6 woman, which means I'm "That little elf" when I'm playing pickup with mostly adult men.

I think I will try to go back to beginner. I am also looking into getting a cushioned hat so I can go public skating again.


Last edited by octopi: 01-31-2009 at 04:46 PM.
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01-31-2009, 04:46 PM
  #54
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One good point about pick-up is that you're playing with skilled players but the pace is not that fast...I think that's what makes it a great option to get better(as stated before..if the players are all good people)

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01-31-2009, 05:42 PM
  #55
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why don't you just go to sticktime and work on stuff there. Theres always people of every skill level there. and if you feel ridiculious skating amongst little kids, people dont think about you as much as you think they do, really no one cares.

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02-01-2009, 12:56 AM
  #56
EmptyNetter
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Originally Posted by octopi View Post
I gave it 8 years, and am still probably the 50th millionth ranked adult player on earth.
For your own good stop comparing yourself to other players. Compare yourself to yourself. Skate regularly with a friend who can give you an objective opinion about how you're progressing.

Quote:
And when I was playing, I wanted nothing more than to be absolutly the best player ever. Sometimes there are just physical reasons why you can't go over a certain level. The skill set I have doesn't bother me, its just that finding the time and people to play with is somewhat difficult.
It's not about wanting so much as it's about prioritizing. How much time per week -- how many hours per day do you work on improving your game? If you can't join a pickup game how about going to an open skate and just. . . skating? Backwards, forwards, stopping, quick starting. Practice stick handling a golf ball in the garage, basement or even in front of the tv. I work in a customer service dept and I used to read as many hockey websites as I could find, especially the ones dealing with positional strategy. Believe that you will improve with practice, make the time and find out how to use your time most wisely.

Quote:
For the record, I also have a hard time with speed not only because my gait makes me push off differently, but I am also tiny. Well,by adult hockey player standards, anyways.I'm a 5'6 woman, which means I'm "That little elf" when I'm playing pickup with mostly adult men.
Your gait may be something you can never sufficiently overcome but I'm 5'5". My legs are short but they're strong and I try to get all I can from my pushoff and my stride. I'm a comparatively better backward skater. Since a lot of my fellow players hate skating backwards and want to score goals I focus on playing defense. Maybe you can work on your agility and use it as an asset. Maybe you can work on your shot accuracy and park yourself in the slot. Find something you can do well and do it better than anybody else. Then remember to appreciate what you've accomplished.

You can do this. Work hard, be patient with yourself and don't forget to have fun.

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Old
02-01-2009, 09:09 AM
  #57
Mr Jiggyfly
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Originally Posted by octopi View Post
I gave it 8 years, and am still probably the 50th millionth ranked adult player on earth.And when I was playing, I wanted nothing more than to be absolutly the best player ever. Sometimes there are just physical reasons why you can't go over a certain level. The skill set I have doesn't bother me, its just that finding the time and people to play with is somewhat difficult.
My brother and I grew up playing hockey together...

But despite playing for 15+ years, he never became a very good skater and his hockey skills always left something to be desired.

Now I was always more athletically gifted and he was what I would call "athletically challenged"...

But I believe I became a better hockey player because I practiced over and over and over... when practice was over, I stayed out on the ice and worked on my weaknesses...

My brother made excuses... he had a bad knee.. a bad ankle blah blah... that is why he couldn't push himself...

He never got out of his comfort zone and was content to be a bad skater...

That is the key - getting out of your comfort zone.

My best suggestion is to get a pair of rollerblades and practice alone somewhere (tennis court, basketball court, etc).

With the exception of stopping, all the techniques required to rollerblade transition to ice very well.

In fact, you will feel faster on ice because rollerblades are heavier.

- Rocker your rollerblades... this will make it feel like you are skating on ice skates and really improve your balance and turning.

- Don't even bring a stick or puck... just keep working on your skating. Having a puck there to mess around with will just distract you... plus it is harder to skate without a stick for balance.

- Watch these free vids and practice the techniques they show over and over:

http://www.expertvillage.com/video/7...r-stopping.htm

Then try to hit the ice at a public skate and practice what you have learned.

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