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How to get lift from shots???

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Old
02-14-2009, 04:56 AM
  #1
Grind Line
 
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How to get lift from shots???

I've got a problem with getting the puck off the ice with shots.
Wrist slots i can get it to fly although with not much power.
With slap shots i have the power behind the shot but it stays on the ice.
Any help is appreciated

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Old
02-14-2009, 09:46 AM
  #2
Semper Sens
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Where does the puck make contact with your stick when you take slap shots?

I used to have the same problem as you where no matter I took the shot it would just slide along the ice. I always used to think that you were supposed to take slapshots with the "middle" of the blade but this year I've been hitting the puck closer to the toe of my blade and my shots have alot more lift.

I'm not sure if that's proper technique but it's been working. Good luck!

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Old
02-14-2009, 09:50 AM
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Devil Dancer
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I used to have that problem all the time, but it got better when I switched to a MUCH shorter stick. It still happens occasionally, but much less frequently.

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Old
02-14-2009, 09:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Devil Dancer View Post
I used to have that problem all the time, but it got better when I switched to a MUCH shorter stick. It still happens occasionally, but much less frequently.
I noticed that too after I cut my stick. I could get the puck off the ice much easier on a slapshot after I cut my stick.

Also having a stick with an open curve would help get the puck up.

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Old
02-14-2009, 12:52 PM
  #5
Placebo Effect
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Devil Dancer View Post
I used to have that problem all the time, but it got better when I switched to a MUCH shorter stick. It still happens occasionally, but much less frequently.
This is funny, I have had that problem too. I haven't cut my stick yet but yesterday I tried for the first time to choke down a bit and my first shot went off the ice about 8 inches. Of course after that it went back to hugging the ice, but either way while choking down I felt I was getting more flush contact and the puck was actually traveling faster. Hopefully I can perfect getting it off the ice now.

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Old
02-14-2009, 01:04 PM
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Gunnar Stahl 30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gc View Post
Where does the puck make contact with your stick when you take slap shots?

I used to have the same problem as you where no matter I took the shot it would just slide along the ice. I always used to think that you were supposed to take slapshots with the "middle" of the blade but this year I've been hitting the puck closer to the toe of my blade and my shots have alot more lift.

I'm not sure if that's proper technique but it's been working. Good luck!
you shouldnt shoot a slap shot off the toe of your blade, you wont get nearly as much power. if you shoot more from the heel you will get alot more power. the follow through is key. where your stick is pointed after on your follow through is where the puck should go

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Old
02-14-2009, 06:43 PM
  #7
McMonster
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you have to try different techniques and experiment yourself... we're all different.

thats how I learned how to do everything... by experimenting myself

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Old
02-14-2009, 08:12 PM
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You have to lift the blade up higher on the follow through to get the puck up. And try to make sure you're transferring your weight.

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Old
02-15-2009, 02:10 PM
  #9
JLHockeyKnight
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MistaWrista View Post
You have to lift the blade up higher on the follow through to get the puck up. And try to make sure you're transferring your weight.
Also practice practice practice! Work on making sure you make contact with the ground just before contact with the stick. Also, make sure you follow through. If you stop and don't follow through you get nothing on the shot. Just a suggestion.

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Old
02-15-2009, 02:23 PM
  #10
busta9
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when taking slap shots make sure the puck is closer to your back foot (this will instantly give you more power in your shot) and the higher you follow through with your shot the higher it will go.

For all shots including wrist shots start with the puck at the heel of the stick as you follow through the puck will roll along and stop making contact near the toe of the blade. When the puck is flying through the air it is actually spinning as well.

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Old
02-15-2009, 03:10 PM
  #11
Grave77digger
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The easy answer is to change to an open faced blade like a Drury or Lidstrom (Easton). They helped me immensely while my form was bad. Then when I got the correct form I was launching the puck over the net from inside the blue paint, missing wide open nets...groan... lol

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Old
02-15-2009, 05:52 PM
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grind Line View Post
I've got a problem with getting the puck off the ice with shots.
Wrist slots i can get it to fly although with not much power.
With slap shots i have the power behind the shot but it stays on the ice.
Any help is appreciated

Ok, so there are a lot of factors that come into play to make the shot hard, fast and the ability to fly.

Lets start with the first one.
1. The stick blade needs to be closed and not open. Which means that when you draw back, the blade needs to be parallel to the ground, not pointing the tip of the blade up in the air.

2. When you make contact with the puck, the blade should have about a 45 degree angle on the approach of the puck.

3. Once you make contact with the surface, hit the surface about 1 to 2 inches away from the puck.

4. During the contact, make sure that you grip the shaft harder so the shaft will not turn when you make contact with the surface.

5. At this point, you will see the blade start to adjust to the contact of the surface to meet the puck. Make sure that you ad pressure to the shaft with the hand that is at the middle of the shaft. This will help make the flex of the stick work for you and it will act like a compound bow.

6. Before you make contact, make sure that your body is facing a 45 degree away from the goalie. This will force you to shoot across your body to use the full swinging force through the shot. The best way to make this happen is to use a shooting alley. Use this coaching tip on this link, to get a better idea.
http://forums.internationalhockey.ne...ead.php?t=5877

7. Now, if you want to make the puck fly up, place the puck a little more towards the lead skate just off center when you are going down the shooting alley and follow through high with your stick. Make sure that you roll your wrist so that the tip of the blade points to the target that you are trying to hit. AKA: open areas, not the goalies stomach.

8. If you want the shot to go low and on the ice, place the puck more towards the back skate, which is more away from the goalie while you are traveling down the alley, just a little off center and follow through slow. Again, roll your wrist and point to the target.

9. Last thing is weight transfer while making contact with the ice. If you are going down the shooting alley, make sure that all of the weight is on the lead skate. Then shift the weight free leg back as you follow through with the shot. This is to provide you with a counter-balance move to keep you from falling.

Make sure that when you bring that counter-balance leg back, you don't pick that leg up. try to keep the toe touching the ice. This will help keep the energy at the ice point of contact with the puck.

Hope this helps.
Head coach

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Old
02-15-2009, 06:39 PM
  #13
Marotte Marauder
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Work on quick release, accuracy then power. The GREAT majority of goals are scored in the bottom 12" of the net. If you can hit those corners consistently along with a five hole, you'll be scoring bushels of goals.


Good luck

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Old
02-15-2009, 11:15 PM
  #14
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on a wrist shot, start with the puck behind your back foot, draw the stick back and cradle the puck in such a way that your hands are behind your center of gravity and the palm of your bottom hand is facing down towards the ice. Shift your weight through your hips towards your front foot, turn your upper body while pressing down on the stick to flex it. Make an explosive uncoiling move with what's left of your upper body momentum, snap your hands forward, and as the puck is coming forward about the spot where your front foot is, snap your wrists forward and turn your bottom hand towards your target. If your follow through is high, your shot will go high. As you're following through, point the toe of your stick exactly where you want the puck to end up. As you perfect this technique, you'll be able to roof it in whatever corner you want with ease. As you get closer to the net, you'll have to exaggerate the follow-through movement to get the puck up, almost like throwing your palms straight up. Just get the feel of it and practice it until you've got it down.
Check this video out for a demonstration.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=obIvQC8h4y8

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Old
02-15-2009, 11:46 PM
  #15
adaminnj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Headcoach View Post
Ok, so there are a lot of factors that come into play to make the shot hard, fast and the ability to fly.

Lets start with the first one.
1. The stick blade needs to be closed and not open. Which means that when you draw back, the blade needs to be parallel to the ground, not pointing the tip of the blade up in the air.

2. When you make contact with the puck, the blade should have about a 45 degree angle on the approach of the puck.

3. Once you make contact with the surface, hit the surface about 1 to 2 inches away from the puck.

4. During the contact, make sure that you grip the shaft harder so the shaft will not turn when you make contact with the surface.

5. At this point, you will see the blade start to adjust to the contact of the surface to meet the puck. Make sure that you ad pressure to the shaft with the hand that is at the middle of the shaft. This will help make the flex of the stick work for you and it will act like a compound bow.

6. Before you make contact, make sure that your body is facing a 45 degree away from the goalie. This will force you to shoot across your body to use the full swinging force through the shot. The best way to make this happen is to use a shooting alley. Use this coaching tip on this link, to get a better idea.
http://forums.internationalhockey.ne...ead.php?t=5877

7. Now, if you want to make the puck fly up, place the puck a little more towards the lead skate just off center when you are going down the shooting alley and follow through high with your stick. Make sure that you roll your wrist so that the tip of the blade points to the target that you are trying to hit. AKA: open areas, not the goalies stomach.

8. If you want the shot to go low and on the ice, place the puck more towards the back skate, which is more away from the goalie while you are traveling down the alley, just a little off center and follow through slow. Again, roll your wrist and point to the target.

9. Last thing is weight transfer while making contact with the ice. If you are going down the shooting alley, make sure that all of the weight is on the lead skate. Then shift the weight free leg back as you follow through with the shot. This is to provide you with a counter-balance move to keep you from falling.

Make sure that when you bring that counter-balance leg back, you don't pick that leg up. try to keep the toe touching the ice. This will help keep the energy at the ice point of contact with the puck.

Hope this helps.
Head coach
What?

try this!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNgwb...e=channel_page

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Old
02-16-2009, 08:55 AM
  #16
vivianmb
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answer...
wrist strength, and weight distribution.
"lean" on the shot and "roll" your wrists as you shoot.

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Old
02-18-2009, 12:30 AM
  #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vivianmb View Post
answer...
wrist strength, and weight distribution.
"lean" on the shot and "roll" your wrists as you shoot.
I just saw this what do you think?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zlLHtwEX88

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Old
02-18-2009, 01:03 AM
  #18
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Have you tried a longer stick?

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Old
02-18-2009, 02:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adaminnj View Post
I just saw this what do you think?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zlLHtwEX88
Well, that works if you are simply trying to get the puck off the ice. But as for a shot? Try that in any situation when the goalie isn't already undressed on the ice and you'll get laughed at.

For wrists shots and slap-shots rolling the wrist is key to gaining lift.

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Old
02-18-2009, 10:21 AM
  #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IniNew View Post
Well, that works if you are simply trying to get the puck off the ice. But as for a shot? Try that in any situation when the goalie isn't already undressed on the ice and you'll get laughed at.

For wrists shots and slap-shots rolling the wrist is key to gaining lift.
I agree. This type of shot is used when you are in close to the goalie. But, this is a very easy shot to stop due to the angle of approach on the shot and the angle that the goalie has on the shooter.

If the goalie is doing a two legged pad slide, you might be able to get this over his pad. But I have stopped a many shots like this by lifting the pad.

Plus, the shot is very easy to read. The minute the shoulder drop from the shooter and the stick blade goes at that 45 degree angle, you know it's going up. Then it just a matter of taking away the space.

Like IniNew said..."For wrists shots and slap-shots rolling the wrist is key to gaining lift."


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Old
02-18-2009, 01:28 PM
  #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grind Line View Post
I've got a problem with getting the puck off the ice with shots.
Wrist slots i can get it to fly although with not much power.
With slap shots i have the power behind the shot but it stays on the ice.
Any help is appreciated
There are a lot of variables to this so it is probably nearly impossible to explain this over the internet. Just practicing and emulating what you see people do will help you the most. I remember asking the same question when I was young and it took many days of practicing for me to get good at it. You don't have to go to the rink if you have a nice patch of concrete like a driveway. Practice swinging softly and just trying to get the puck to lift. Don't try and kill it at first. Once you get better at lifting, keep swing harder to and focus on controlling it.

I'd suggest getting a stick with a nice heal curve. The blade will look almost like a 2 or 3 iron (golf club). It makes it much easier to lift the puck with that kind of a blade because if you hit the blade flat on the ice, it will basically scoop the puck up for you like a golf club would.

Another thing to do is experiment with different flex sticks (depending on your age & weight). I know when I was really young, using a stick that had a bit of flex helped me get some power on the shot. Once I got better at shooting, the flex was too much and I started using a much stiffer stick.

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Old
02-18-2009, 02:45 PM
  #22
rye&ginger
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Lift comes from:
- hitting the puck more forward in your stance
- getting under the puck. get too much ice or too little and it stays low.
- follow through needs to go high.
- wrist rolling, less so IMO but can work. You lose time.

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Old
02-18-2009, 06:26 PM
  #23
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stay lateral to the puck and most importantly transfer your weight. lower the hand placed on the shaft more towards the blade and just let it rip. obviously you won't shelf it right away.. practice makes perfect

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Old
02-18-2009, 06:51 PM
  #24
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I don't think it has anything to do with sticks...it's your technique. I used to have the same problem.

Go over your fundamentals and make sure you have them all down pat. Heel to toe, point your stick. Transfer your weight especially


Good Luck!

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