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Converting to wing... need some tips :)

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Old
02-19-2009, 12:14 AM
  #1
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Converting to wing... need some tips :)

Converting from Centre to left-wing for the remainder of the season. As a centre, I knew my position to a tee, but as a left wing, it's an entire different ball game.

Any wingers care to share some of their facets and thoughts on the winger game vs centre game? Positioning tips, mentality (should I still use my pass first, shoot second train of thought, or should I be a bit more greedy?)

From the one or two games as a winger, I basically lined up at the left hash marks, played solid D on the left most side of the boards (digging pucks out, chip-outs, retrievals etc), and when the puck was on the right side, I was usually looking for the outlet pass. I'd obviously jump in wherever if I felt there was a dire need.

I would always curl over as I'm skating so I was on the off wing, travel through the shooting lane and pick a spot to shoot at while using a D as a screen. I have been experimenting with a pascal dupuis esque slap shot from the left but accuracy is my problem.

Flip some of that information to what I'm doing in the offensive zone.

Help?

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02-19-2009, 12:31 AM
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noobman
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Get used to playing without the puck. Centres get to handle the puck a lot more than wingers do. As a winger you'll be more concerned with board battles, and looking for passing/shooting options. It ultimately depends on what kind of offensive system your team is running. I play LW and we usually have one guy in front of the net, one guy on the strong side boards, and one guy behind the net. If the puck is on the right side the RW will go for the puck while the LW sets up in front and the C plays below the goal line. On the left side it's the flip, with the RW in front of the net and the C playing below the goal line. Figure out your team's system and determine where you need to be.

You'll also have to adjust to playing wing in the D zone... you may instinctively want to skate into the high slot, but always remember that your job is to cover the points.

Breakouts will be different for you as well. You'll have to try to read your other winger and decide whether you want to be the guy streaking up the ice for the stretch pass, or the guy hanging back a little bit as an alternate option.

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02-19-2009, 12:37 AM
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McMonster
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just remember to stay on your side.

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Old
02-19-2009, 12:40 AM
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Gunnar Stahl 30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dante 71 View Post
just remember to stay on your side.
not necessarily. in your own zone yea, but you dont always have to be on your side, especially if you are cycling the puck or a dump and chase

defensively, stay on your point man, dont let there be too much space in between each other. as a center your job was to help down low and behind the net, but thats not what the winger does

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02-19-2009, 01:57 AM
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FLYLine24
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If you played center..then this shouldnt be hard for you at all. Just pick up your point man in the defensive zone.

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02-19-2009, 09:13 AM
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Defensively, the point man on your side is your responsibility. If he moves in, you move in. If the puck comes towards you as you are covered though, you may give up your spot(your center should notice this, and pick it up, otherwise, do not do it).
Offensively, wingers are extremely important on the break out. Your D will pick it up(usually around their own goal line), and wing it around the boards. You NEED to be there. You catch that pass, and outlet it to the guy streaking up the middle/other side, 9/10 is the center. Catch up to the play, be the trail man, get ready to backcheck. If you are LH, play RW for a sick one timer if you have one. That's all i can think of off the top of my head.

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02-21-2009, 11:11 AM
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goleafsgo93
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some useful stuff here, just joined a league and we're trying to incorporate these skills and strategies in our game.

quick question though, when your a winger in the defensive zone, how far into your own zone should you go?

like ppl have talked about not leaving much distance between the pointman and yourself when your defending, but most of the time, including in the nhl i see the winger normally stand around the faceoff circle area if the puck is either behind the net or to the goalie's left. and if the pointman gets it then sort of rush out to defend against him.

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02-22-2009, 12:42 AM
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Second game... played much, MUCH better. Sniped a goal, blocker side top corner while barreling down the off wing, got a nice deflection goal as well. My most proud achievement though was one of my assists.

I was skating through the neutral zone, passed the puck off. He tapped it forward and I burst up to pick it up. I tapped it over to my other winger who lost control of the puck. I don't know how I did this... and I don't think I ever will again, but I curled the puck back with an outstretched reach while converting from forwards to backwards, flicked it on to my skate and kicked it to my back hand, and then back-hand saucer passed it to my wide open center for the tip in goal. All this happened in the blink of an eye with 3 people surrounding me. I guess it was all instincts because I would have never tried that otherwise.

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02-22-2009, 10:53 AM
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A good tip i recently picked up about covering your point is that you don't have to stay on the guy but always try to position yourself with one shoulder to the man and one shoulder to the puck, so if the play is down low and he is up high you don't have to be 'on' him etc.

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02-22-2009, 02:32 PM
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Theres different types of coverages, but mainly for wingers its not too complicated.

The thing with covering the point man is you dont wnat to be on him. I wouldn't suggest playing man on man because of pinching. Play more of a zone considering the situation. Always create an advantage by creating a small distance from you and the point-man, you want to beat him to the puck.

If the puck is in deep move down the boards a little but not too far that if the puck squeezes out to the D, he can get a shot off before you get to him. Also beware if they curl out to the middle or diagonally in the slot. It's alot easier to look out for when you play man on man but when you do that and the puck comes along the boards from one of your D-men, you dont have much of an advantage to get it out because your too close to the other teams D and they can pinch and keep it in. You have to determine the play, and if the puck is in the opposite corner come down near the face off circle area and wait for the puck to ring around.

It's all based on whats going on and the man your covering if you know he doesn't pinch or he doesnt have much of a pointshot and the current situation.

It's all that hockey-sense that they talk about players that can react and predict correctly to situations quickly. You gotta make the judgments, theres no one position to be in all the time, always be moving.


Last edited by Green13: 02-22-2009 at 02:38 PM.
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02-22-2009, 02:42 PM
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Treliving The Dream
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goleafsgo93 View Post
some useful stuff here, just joined a league and we're trying to incorporate these skills and strategies in our game.

quick question though, when your a winger in the defensive zone, how far into your own zone should you go?

like ppl have talked about not leaving much distance between the pointman and yourself when your defending, but most of the time, including in the nhl i see the winger normally stand around the faceoff circle area if the puck is either behind the net or to the goalie's left. and if the pointman gets it then sort of rush out to defend against him.
It all depends. For the most part, stay on the defenseman. If he pinches in, stay with him, if he's at the point, stand at the point. If you're collapsing, the lowest you should be is at the top of the faceoff circle. It depends on the system your team is playing too.

I moved from wing to centre a couple years ago, and back to wing this year and the biggest thing is to stay in position, especially in your own end. You might find yourself lower than you're suposed to be, seeing as you just converted from centre so the biggest thing is to not get sucked down low. Stay on your point and you should be fine. Always keep your feet moving too, even if you don't have the puck. That way when you get a break-out pass you aren't stationary.

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02-22-2009, 06:40 PM
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COVER YOUR POINT MAN, I CAN'T STRESS THAT ENOUGH

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02-22-2009, 09:21 PM
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goleafsgo93
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CGY View Post
It all depends. For the most part, stay on the defenseman. If he pinches in, stay with him, if he's at the point, stand at the point. If you're collapsing, the lowest you should be is at the top of the faceoff circle. It depends on the system your team is playing too.

I moved from wing to centre a couple years ago, and back to wing this year and the biggest thing is to stay in position, especially in your own end. You might find yourself lower than you're suposed to be, seeing as you just converted from centre so the biggest thing is to not get sucked down low. Stay on your point and you should be fine. Always keep your feet moving too, even if you don't have the puck. That way when you get a break-out pass you aren't stationary.
thanks man, it'll take some time. appreciate the advice

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02-23-2009, 04:01 PM
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rye&ginger
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Don’t leave your zone early too often or at all. Make sure the puck gets out if its going to your side. Try to chip it by the d-man if he pinches (obvious) but being behind him will drive your team crazy and they will think you are lazy/incompetent, espeically if your D cant reliably get it by him without your help.

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02-23-2009, 04:42 PM
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Originally Posted by rye&ginger View Post
Donít leave your zone early too often or at all. Make sure the puck gets out if its going to your side. Try to chip it by the d-man if he pinches (obvious) but being behind him will drive your team crazy and they will think you are lazy/incompetent, espeically if your D cant reliably get it by him without your help.
another thing i've noticed from time to time is understanding your D men on the breakout too.

if you get too far out, even though that is your job sometimes, make sure you support them at all costs. If your C isn't giving your d-men an option for the first pass for whatever reason (covered, lazy) you have to make sure to give him some help.

whether it means the D-man is gonna skate out of trouble cause he's got a lane, make sure you jump back and cover his spot. never let him be the last man back especially if it's tight. if anything just give him a safe outlet otherwise the turnovers will kill.

always be aware!

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02-23-2009, 07:22 PM
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rye&ginger
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yeah, if you are a better skater than the centre on your line, you might be better off being a first pass option anyway.

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03-04-2009, 09:49 PM
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stay on your side, cover your pointmen. GO TO THE NET!

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