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Road to Equipment Manager?

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Old
02-18-2009, 12:06 AM
  #1
Slaying_ice
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Road to Equipment Manager?

Anybody know the path to become one and where to start? I'm really curious about it.

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02-18-2009, 12:08 AM
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Looking to make it in the big leauges eh?

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02-18-2009, 12:10 AM
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Kostik20
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University of Equipment managers....

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02-18-2009, 12:13 AM
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There's no university for it, but you can get a certificate in the mail and thus earn the title "Sultan of Sweat".

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02-18-2009, 01:43 AM
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cptjeff
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To be serious, you work your way up. College teams, junior teams, minor leagues. And knowing somebody would probably be your key to making it to the NHL.

Where you'd start would be a intern or assistant on some team. I'm sure they'd want you to already know how to sharpen skates and such, so working in a shop before that wouldn't hurt.

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02-18-2009, 02:03 AM
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TheGooooch
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Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
Where you'd start would be a intern or assistant on some team. I'm sure they'd want you to already know how to sharpen skates and such, so working in a shop before that wouldn't hurt.
I would assume that this would be crucial and that the individual would have to be quite good at doing that

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02-18-2009, 08:10 AM
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Midnight
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Honestly, I'm not sure why anyone would actually want to be an equipment manager. It's arguably the most strenuous yet thankless job in hockey operations--and the pay's likely to be miserable except possibly in the NHL (but good luck trying to make it that far without some personal connections).

Of course, if you claim to be truly passionate about this kind of role, then more power to you. But for those who just grasping for a way to break into hockey operations, they probably aren't prepared to make the huge sacrifices needed for this kind of job.

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02-18-2009, 08:25 AM
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I think they are paid the same as Ice Girls...$10 a game

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02-18-2009, 09:48 AM
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It's one way of getting your name on the Stanley Cup. Eddy Palchak has his name on the Cup a ridiculous number of times with Montreal.

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02-18-2009, 10:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slaying_ice View Post
Anybody know the path to become one and where to start? I'm really curious about it.
Just be a really ****** hockey player that hangs around the arena a lot. Offer to be a water boy or a stick boy for free then eventually, when they trust you, they might let you handle equipment. After a few years of that - and the old equipment manager retires - you just might get your shot.

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02-18-2009, 05:03 PM
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NYRSinceBirth
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Well, I would assume the following:

- Be exceptionally good at sharpening skates. As in, diagnose what a player is talking/complaining about, and know exactly what needs to be done. Basically, know your ****, and know what needs to be done, during a game if a player is complaining about an edge being too grippy I'm sure he won't be happy if it takes you 5 times to get it right.

- Know how to work with fabrics. By that, I mean cleaning, conditioning, and most importantly, stitching and sewing. Things rip/break, and it's easier to repair than to replace and break back in.

- Have incredible organizational/memory skills. Remember how each player likes their skates, packing and unpacking, bulk cleaning, who's is who's, etc are all part of the game.

- Know all different types of equipment. If a player doesn't like the feel of a certain piece of equipment, know and understand how different companies run sizes and fits to get the players comfortable.

- Be sociable. Let's face it, you're a a bit at the bottom of the totem pole, you really have no room to be an *******. Plus, if the players like you, and you know your stuff and take car of them, it's like guaranteeing you won't get fired.

I'm sure there's more, and others will chime in, but it's not easy. That said, if I could, or had the ability too, become an equipment guy for an NHL team, I'd drop out of school to do so. I'd love to do it, even at other levels.

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02-18-2009, 05:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYRSinceBirth View Post
Well, I would assume the following:

- Be exceptionally good at sharpening skates. As in, diagnose what a player is talking/complaining about, and know exactly what needs to be done. Basically, know your ****, and know what needs to be done, during a game if a player is complaining about an edge being too grippy I'm sure he won't be happy if it takes you 5 times to get it right.

- Know how to work with fabrics. By that, I mean cleaning, conditioning, and most importantly, stitching and sewing. Things rip/break, and it's easier to repair than to replace and break back in.

- Have incredible organizational/memory skills. Remember how each player likes their skates, packing and unpacking, bulk cleaning, who's is who's, etc are all part of the game.

- Know all different types of equipment. If a player doesn't like the feel of a certain piece of equipment, know and understand how different companies run sizes and fits to get the players comfortable.

- Be sociable. Let's face it, you're a a bit at the bottom of the totem pole, you really have no room to be an *******. Plus, if the players like you, and you know your stuff and take car of them, it's like guaranteeing you won't get fired.

I'm sure there's more, and others will chime in, but it's not easy. That said, if I could, or had the ability too, become an equipment guy for an NHL team, I'd drop out of school to do so. I'd love to do it, even at other levels.
that's basically what it's about.

having a local team to start with is a big help. Working at a hockey shop will help you get the basics down. If you can sharpen their skates well it goes a long way to earning their trust. Nobody is going to trust an EQM that gives them uneven edges or the wrong hollow.

research skills help too. You'll be asked to price things out at one time or another. Being able to find the best prices can't hurt.

Think outside the box to find solutions. At the lower levels you aren't going to have the resources available to you that an NHL team has. If something breaks and you don't have the right mechanism or material to fix it properly then FIGURE IT OUT!

Being attentive to the players and communicating with them and the coaching staff are the biggest parts of the job.

That and be willing to sacrifice weekends, sleep, and holidays. The pay is not great, but it's not the worst in the world. If you're passionate about hockey it might be up your alley.

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Old
02-18-2009, 05:29 PM
  #13
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I'm currently an equipment manager for a DI hockey team. I started out when I was in college working as the skate sharpener for my team (I played DIII). Once I was out of school I started working in a hockey shop. While there I learned a ton about repair, fitting, and maintenance.

If you are in college already I would suggest talking to the current equipment managers and seeing if they have any student openings. You will start with the crappy work like laundry and folding but eventually you will be given more responsibilities.

If you are still in high school you should think about getting a job in a shop. You can learn a lot there.

I will agree with the above in that it is a thankless job. You work a ton of hours and rarely have days off in season. It gets worse the higher level you go because of all the additional travel. Good teams don't travel light, they bring a ton of stuff with them, all of which you are responsible for. It's nice at the collegiate level because you can assign extra baggage to underclassmen. I'm not sure that flys with the pros.

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02-18-2009, 06:14 PM
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Originally Posted by forbs02 View Post
It's nice at the collegiate level because you can assign extra baggage to underclassmen. I'm not sure that flys with the pros.
it does. there's a head equipment manager and then a few assistants.

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Old
02-19-2009, 12:31 AM
  #15
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At the minor league level guys are generally still carrying their own bags and whatnot.

You don't see that at the NHL level.

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Old
02-19-2009, 01:50 AM
  #16
Heat McManus
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i didn't get that right. I thought he meant underclassmen working with the managers. Not underclassmen on the squad. I know some programs are lucky enough to have an equipment manager and then some extra help. Yea, Schenn isn't carrying Antropov's bag.

Apparently a few higher leagues in Europe still have their players carrying their bags.

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Old
02-19-2009, 10:06 AM
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Hamilton35
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There is more to the job title than carrying bags. Thats why even the minor league teams have them

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Old
02-19-2009, 10:23 AM
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I'm the same way I want to be an equipment manager in the show to. I started off in mIdget AAA league in quebec this year. knowing how to sharpen skates, knowing how the helmets work read a lot about the new stuff coming out.But I heard that once you move up to major junior or NCAA there is a lot of wash to do. Like the under armour and socks plus practice stuff everyday.PLus you have to unpack and pack the bags before/after a road trip.

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Old
02-19-2009, 02:22 PM
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Heat McManus
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Doing laundry is an all day thing usually. First thing once I'm in the door is put things in the washer and the last thing I do before I leave is fold things coming out of the dryer.

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Old
02-19-2009, 03:08 PM
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EmptyNetter
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Here's a pretty comprehensive view of the job the Boston Bruins' equimpent manager does and how he got there. http://www.hockeyjournal.com/Article.php?ArtID=574838

My hat's off to anybody who takes care of his players like that.

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Old
02-20-2009, 12:15 AM
  #21
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Originally Posted by ibeck View Post
I'm the same way I want to be an equipment manager in the show to. I started off in mIdget AAA league in quebec this year. knowing how to sharpen skates, knowing how the helmets work read a lot about the new stuff coming out.But I heard that once you move up to major junior or NCAA there is a lot of wash to do. Like the under armour and socks plus practice stuff everyday.PLus you have to unpack and pack the bags before/after a road trip.
Home team does both home and away laundry on a game day at the NHL level.

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Old
02-20-2009, 06:49 AM
  #22
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Originally Posted by ModSquad View Post
Home team does both home and away laundry on a game day at the NHL level.
Also in major junior, but the away team just uses the home teams washer and dryer,they dont actually wash the away team's stuff.

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