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ATD10 Double-A Draft

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Old
03-24-2009, 08:00 AM
  #51
seventieslord
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C/RW Charlie Sands



- Stanley Cup Winner (1939)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1933)
- Top-10 in goals twice (8th-1937, 10th-1938)
- 8th in assists (1940)

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
Forward Charlie Sands played over 400 NHL games with four different clubs in the 30s and 40s. He was a decent offensive player who could check well and rarely found himself in the penalty box.

Born in Fort William, Ontario, Sands played with the local Forts and Port Arthur Ports of the TBSHL before dressing for three games with the Toronto Maple Leafs in 1932-33. He spent most of that season with the IAHL's Syracuse Stars then scored eight goals as a solid role player for the Leafs the next year which included participation in the Ace Bailey Benefit Game.

In May, 1934, Sands was sent to the Boston Bruins for cash. He fit in well and scored 15 goals for his new club while playing on a line with Marty Barry and *** *******. Two years later he scored a personal high 18 goals for the club while teaming with Bill Cowley and Rey Getliffe.

Early in the 1939-40 season Sands was sent to the Montreal Canadiens in exchange for Herb Cain. He was a fine checker and playmaker for four years with the Habs before he was loaned to the New York Rangers for a few games in 1943-44. Sands retired in 1945-46 after playing a few contests for the Los Angeles Monarchs of the PCHL.


Last edited by seventieslord: 03-24-2009 at 06:23 PM.
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Old
03-24-2009, 08:01 AM
  #52
VanIslander
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HC Sparta Praha select a center/right winger who has had peaks at every level from NCAA to Olympics to Canada Cup to Stanley Cup playoffs



Mark Johnson, intelligent, clutch forward



- two-time All-American, NCAA tourney champion
- played in eight world championships and the '81, '84, '87 Canada Cups
- scored 5 points in 6 games at '84 Canada Cup
- captained NHL team Whalers (1983-85) and played in NHL all-star game (1984)
- scored 508 NHL points in 669 NHL games
- scored team-leading 10 goals and 18 points in 18 games as the 1988 Devils came within one game of the Stanley Cup Finals
- scored against Tretiak and Myshkin in a certain 1980 Olympics game, have you heard? 11 pts in 7 Olympic games including the game winner over Finland in the 4-2 gold medal final
- inducted into the IIHF Hall of Fame in 1999

Quote:
...speed and offensive savvy... solid effort... A popular player wherever he went... often deployed on both the power-play and the penalty-killing units and was always highly regarded for his on ice intelligence.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net:8080/...p?player=13116

-----------------

HC Sparta Praha are pleased to select a Hobey Baker and Selke finalist who has elite speed and hockey smarts



Kelly Miller, passing, defensive left winger



463 NHL points in 1057 NHL games, including 33 GWGs; and 54 NHL playoff points in 119 NHL postseason games.

Quote:
... a fine playmaker and checker... his quick hands made him a dangerous passer and a tough opponent on faceoffs... His creativity on offense and his willingness to stay with his man and backcheck helped the club reach the Stanley semi-finals in 1990 and the final in 1998. He was also the club's NHLPA representative and served as interim team captain twice.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net:8080/...p?player=11121

Quote:
... The undersized speedster would amass one of the greatest careers in Michigan State history, including a Hobey Baker nomination in 1985 as the best player in US college hockey. The two time Michigan State MVP and team captain also starred with the United States junior team, representing the nation at the World Junior Championships three times.

Miller worked hard to evolve into a defensive specialist,... a finalist for the Selke Trophy, as NHL's best defensive forward, in 1992.

...a very unpredictable skater, and that was his best asset. He was lightning quick, but knew how to throw off the opposition by using his speed in multiple gears. His hand and stick skills never caught up to him at the NHL level, but as his career progressed he became a decent passer while on the break. He was strong at reading plays and great at anticipating moves, allowing him to become a top checker and penalty killer. He was a tiny little guy, but he did put what he had into an engaging physical game.

Not surprisingly, Miller was a crowd favorite in Washington. Those fans were happy for Miller as much as anyone when the Capitals made an unexpected journey to the Stanley Cup finals in 1998. Despite losing the finals to Detroit, the experience was one of Miller's career highlights. He had been through good times and bad in Washington, and it must have been justifying to be a part of that team.

After finishing the year at the World Championships, Miller retired in 1999
http://washingtoncapitalslegends.blo...ly-miller.html

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Old
03-24-2009, 08:02 AM
  #53
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The GM head office in Prague is puzzled but tickled that an all-time great at what he does, in terms of talent, peak, career and championship experience is still available: one of the great support players and a significant part in the history of hockey: two-way talented, tough, hardworking, feisty, ferocious, competitive, clutch, leader, team-first, successful on a top line or checking line, deserving of the main draft as a quality depth pick in an all-time context



Bob "Hound Dog" Kelly, fierce, forechecking left winger



Quote:
one of the toughest and the most tenacious... True to his nickname, Kelly bounded across the ice like an unleashed bloodhound, throwing his body around with abandon. A consummate team player, Kelly did whatever it took to win. He'd be the first in line to fight to defend a teammate.
He'd sacrifice offense for defense. He'd chip in timely goals.

Off the ice, Kelly's good-natured sense of humor and outgoing personality made him a favorite of teammates, fans, and reporters alike.
A consummate team player, Kelly was a sparkplug in the Flyers Stanley Cup engine.
http://flyers.nhl.com/team/app?servi...Page&bcid=2920


362 points in 837 NHL games with 1454 PIM and 23 GWGs (23 points, 172 PIM in 101 playoff games)
4-time Stanley Cup finalist, 2-time champion

Quote:
The ‘Houndog’ brought plenty of bite to his game as one of the Broad Street Bullies, but Bob James Kelly could also hurt the opposition in plenty of other ways, too....

“The kid has lots of polish and is definitely hard to ignore,” praised the ex-Flyers coach, of the rugged rookie, who appeared in 76 games in 1970-71. “He can also add some offensive punch to our lineup.”

In his first year at the pro level, Kelly, when he wasn’t bowling over opponents or dropping the gloves, provided 14 goals and 18 assists, making him a valuable asset at both ends of the ice.

He duplicated that goal total in his sophomore campaign, reaching the double-digit mark in tallies in three of his first four NHL seasons. And as Kelly became more comfortable in his contributions, he began to elevate the physical side to his game, part of an intimidating group that would eventually earn the well-deserved ‘Broad Street Bullies’ moniker.

Aside from his hard-hitting ways, Kelly was a plus player in the truest sense, sporting a positive plus/minus rating in his first 10 NHL seasons, including a stellar plus+21 in 1974-75.

Kelly was also a major player in Philadelphia’s back-to-back Stanley Cup wins in 1974 and 1975, crashing and bashing rivals with a steady diet of bone-crushing body checks. In 1975, he netted three goals and added three assists in 16 playoff games.

On a team that featured mobility and muscle,... Kelly fit in perfectly.

In his final year in orange and black, 1979-80, Kelly had 15 goals and 20 assists, accompanied by 122 penalty minutes and a plus-19 rating, typical statistics for a player that relied on grit and guts to get the job done on a nightly basis.

In the summer of 1980, Kelly was traded to the Washington Capitals.. ‘Hound dog’ responded to the trade in fine fashion, scoring a career-best 26 goals along with 36 helpers. Although the Caps didn’t make the post-season, there was no ignoring the forward’s fine play during the regular schedule.

Overall, Kelly played in 837 NHL contests, recording 154 goals and 362 points. He was also a veteran of 101 playoff games, netting nine goals and 23 points overall.

It was truly a remarkable career for a player who went full-out every shift he took, never giving an inch to anyone regardless of their size or reputation.
http://www.nhlalumni.net/?pid=news_a...01_1059696000_

Quote:
...a solid offensive player at the junior level (21 goals and 44 points in 54 games as an Oshawa Generals rookie... it was already clear that his physical play, more than his goal scoring, would be Kelly's calling card.

Kelly was not only a fearsome forechecker, he also knew what to do when he dropped the gloves. He quickly gained the reputation as one of the toughest...
In Kelly's second OHA season, he averaged close to a point-per game (21 goals and 53 points in 54 games) to go along with his 117 penalty minutes.

"My first three NHL games were an unbelievable test for me and the whole team. Right away, I'm out there playing against teams like Montreal and Boston," says Kelly today. "I nearly froze up on my first shift. I'm out on the ice and there's guys like Henri Richard and [Jean] Beliveau."

Kelly soon overcame his nerves. During much of his rookie and second season, he played left wing on Clarke's line. Both years, Kelly tallied 14 goals. In his second season, he added 157 penalty minutes to the mix.
Quote:
"My role changed under Freddie (Shero)," says Kelly today. "We had guys like Billy Barber and Ross Lonsberry who could play on the scoring lines, so Freddie used me to give the guys energy."

Shero did not view taking Kelly off of Clarke's line as a demotion, even if it meant less ice time for the player. Rather, he said that forechecking and fighting were areas where Kelly could stand out.

"If Bob Kelly scores twenty goals, I'm not using him properly," said the Fog (coach Fred Shero) in 1973. "He's got something that's hard to come by. No coach in the world can make a guy do what Kelly does. It's not in his contract. It comes from within him."

Every player from new team captain Bobby Clarke on down had the utmost respect for Kelly's value to the club.

"Anyone who says Kelly doesn't belong in the NHL has no idea what goes into winning hockey games," said Clarke in the mid-1970s. "Show me a team that wouldn't take Kelly in a heartbeat and I'll show you a team that doesn't want to be a winner."

While Dave "The Hammer" Schultz was the Flyers' best known and most frequent pugilist, Kelly was arguably the toughest. "He always gets in three or four punches before the other guy realizes he's in a fight," marveled Clarke. "He throws punches faster than anyone in the league."

Even the Hammer himself concurred. "In terms of pure toughness, Kelly was first on the Flyers and I was second," Schultz told prolific hockey writer Stan Fischler. "With all due respect, Kelly became the heavyweight champion of the Flyers."

Statistically, Kelly had the worst season of his career in 1973-74. In 65 games, he scored just four goals and 14 points in fairly limited ice time and went pointless in the playoffs. His penalty totals dropped from 238 minutes to 130. But, as always, stats revealed little about his value to the team. For example, one night during the 1973-74 season, the Rangers jumped out to a 3-0 lead at the Spectrum. Shero's Flyers needed every bit of energy Kelly could provide them. The Hound toppled Rangers left and right, whipped Ron Harris in a fight, and assisted on two goals, helping the team rally all the way back to earn a tie.

Kelly's battles with the Rangers continued in the playoffs. After the Flyers dispatched the Atlanta Flames in the first round, they embarked on a seven game war with the Blueshirts. Kelly was a thorn in the Rangers' side throughout the first two games. Shero sent Kelly to "hound" Harris and drive New York to distraction with his forechecking. Rangers coach Emile Francis countered by switching Harris to another line and replacing him with rookie Jerry Butler. Kelly promptly pounded Butler. The Flyers took the first two games of the series at home.

Quote:
scored the 1975 Stanley Cup winning goal

Quote:
One of Shero's offbeat practice drills was to have his players take the puck behind the net, swing out quickly in front and try to score. The winner received a $5 prize. Little did anyone know that the drill would pay huge dividends. With the Flyers leading the Buffalo Sabres 3 games to 2 in the Stanley Cup Finals, they entered the third period of Game 6 in a scoreless deadlock. In the opening minute of the third period, Shero sicked the Hound on the Sabres. Kelly pounced on huge Sabres defenseman Jerry Korab behind the Buffalo net, jarring the puck free. He then swooped out in front of the net and beat Sabres' goalie Roger Crozier for his 3rd goal of the playoffs and the biggest goal of his career. Kelly was mobbed by his teammates. As he got back to the bench, he looked at Shero and said, "Freddie, that's five bucks you owe me." Kelly's tally was all Philly would need. A Bill Clement insurance marker gave the Flyers a 2-0 win behind Bernie Parent's shutout goaltending. The Flyers were once again the Stanley Cup champions. Today, Kelly says that he considers the second Cup "a little bit sweeter" than the first, because he was such a key contributor.


Quote:
January 11th, 1976, Kelly manhandles the Red Army in the Flyers 4-1 win

Quote:
Kelly enjoyed two his best seasons in 1976-77 and 1977-78. The first year, he received increased ice time and, for the first time, cracked the 20-goal barrier to go along with his 125 penalty minutes. The next, he scored 19 and was a playoff warrior, with three goals, eight points and uncounted big hits in 12 games. In particular, Kelly gave the Toronto Maple Leafs fits.

...the Flyers new head coach... Quinn's first moves was to experiment with a new line combination. He put Kelly on the left wing of a line with tough center Mel Bridgman... providing both energy and supporting offense... With Kelly, as usual, working tirelessly in the corners and creating extra room for teammates, Bridgman went on to score 24 goals and 59 points in addition to his 184 penalty minutes "Bob Kelly is one guy I never have to worry about," said Pat Quinn shortly before the 1979-80 season. "He comes to play every night and he's a leader both on and off the ice."

The 1979-80 season would be Kelly's last as a Flyer. He made it count. Now playing a veteran leadership role, Kelly dressed in 75 regular season games and 19 playoff contests. Although assigned primarily to checking duties, Kelly scored 15 goals. He also still knew how to lift the club's spirits with a well-timed fight or body check (122 penalty minutes). Kelly was right in the thick of the action as the Flyers set a North American professional sports record by going undefeated in 35 consecutive games. They ultimately lost in a heartbreaking six game Stanley Cup Final against the New York Islanders, who went on to win four consecutive Cups.

The Flyers traded Kelly to the lowly Washington Capitals... Knowing only how to play full speed ahead, the Hound put up his highest penalty totals since 1972-73 (157 penalty minutes). He also had to take on an increased offensive burden and responded with his best statistical season in the NHL – 26 goals and 62 points.

Kelly retired with 837 regular season games and 101 playoff tilts to his credit. He notched 154 regular season goals and 1,454 penalty minutes without having played a single game in the minor leagues.
http://flyers.nhl.com/team/app?servi...Page&bcid=2920

Quote:
scored an important momentum-preserving insurance goal as a game star in the Flyers' NHL record-setting 29th consecutive unbeaten game (in what would become their 35-game streak), a 5-2 win over Boston in 1980


Quote:
"The Hound" was an instant hit with the Flyers fans and his teammates. Kelly soon became one of the team's resident pranksters – and was himself often the victim of practical jokes.

It was, in fact, a rookie Kelly who was the subject of one of the most elaborate practical jokes in Flyers' annals: the snipe hunt. The tale is still often retold by Kelly's old teammates and has been recounted in numerous hockey books.

For over a month, the veterans on the team told Kelly stories about all the fun they'd have snipe hunting. Then they claimed that rookies weren't allowed to participate.

"What's a snipe?" asked Kelly.

"They're sort of like pigeons," answered Flyers' veteran defenseman Ed Van Impe.

"Can you eat them?"

"Only the breasts. My wife cooks them in a wine sauce and are they ever delicious!" said Van Impe.

Kelly begged to come along. Van Impe said he'd consider making an exception to the no-rookies "rule."

Over the next few days, Kelly's teammates instructed him in the art of snipe hunting. Goalie Doug Favell had him practice "snipe calls" while enforcer Earl Heiskala told him that the way to hunt snipes is to beat the bushes with long poles and when the snipes fly, to shine a flashlight on them. The birds would get panicked and confused, giving the hunters a chance to catch them in fishing nets.

Of course, it was all a joke to initiate Kelly into the NHL fraternity. Van Impe arranged with friends in the Delaware County police department to come arrest Kelly for "hunting snipe without a license in a snipe preserve." They even arranged for a stern justice of the peace to scare Kelly into thinking he was going to jail. Finally, his teammates materialized in the courtroom and let him off the hook.

After the initial shock subsided, Kelly responded with his usual good humor.
And, for the fun of it, see retired Bob Kelly vs. Bernie Parent in tockey:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ymlwszqTScY

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Old
03-24-2009, 08:09 AM
  #54
VanIslander
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seventieslord,

- Cooper I had as one of three for the #4/#5 slots
- McDonald was down low on a deep right wing list (but I didn't find as much info on him as you did)
- Sands I've heemed and hummed about and decided to pass on
- Harry Smith was totally off my radar: good pick... forgot about the Smiths after got Alf and Tommy

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03-24-2009, 08:35 AM
  #55
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HC Sparta Praha is proud to select a 500-goal scoring Jew who even Hitler had to let the team captain play for Germany at the 1936 Olympic Games because of his reputation as one of the best and his role in the nation's winning a medal (Bronze) at the '32 Olympics.



Rudi Ball, scoring right winger



Quote:
A real artist at skating and stick handling.. combined with a 'deadly shot'...
http://www.azhockey.com/Ba.htm

- was voted as the best European ice hockey player in a French Sports Magazine in 1930
- was considered one of the most popular and dreaded European ice hockey players prior to the Second World War.

Quote:
... While reasonably short, Ball was considered extremely fast on the ice and was admired as having much skill and ability.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudi_Ball

Quote:
In 1936, having Jewish heritage, Ball (the 25-year-old captain) was initially overlooked for selection in the German ice hockey team. ... Ball also believed a deal could be struck to save his family in Germany if he returned to play in the games. The German selectors also realized that without Ball.. the team would not stand a chance of winning. Another factor was that the Nazi party could not overlook the fact that Ball was without doubt one of the leading athletes in his sport. With much controversy Ball was included in the German team to play at the 1936 Olympic games. The deal for Ball's family to leave Germany was also agreed. After Ball was injured, the Germans took 5th place in the Olympic tournament. Ball played four matches and scored two goals.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudi_Ball

Olympic Bronze (1932)
World Championship Silver (1930)
European Championship Gold (1930)
World Championship Bronze (1932)
European Championship Bronze (1936 & 1938)
8 German Championships (1928 - 1944)
Spengler Cup (1928-29, 1934-35 & 1935-36)
IIHF Ice Hockey Hall of Fame (2004)

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Old
03-24-2009, 10:37 AM
  #56
seventieslord
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Rudy Ball sounds familiar. And I think I know why. When I was researching Malecek in MLD9 I think I read a couple quotes that said things like "in Europe, only the great Rudi Ball was comparable to Malecek." - So I think you have a pretty good one there.


Last edited by seventieslord: 03-27-2009 at 01:21 AM.
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Old
03-24-2009, 11:50 AM
  #57
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Tucson selects:

C Guy Chouinard



575 points in 578 Games
6th in Scoring 78-79

Calgary Flames Legends:
Quote:
This clever center racked up some respectable numbers during his 10 year NHL career.

Called "Gramps" by his teammates because of his looks which made him appear a lot older than he was, Guy Chouinard emerged as the Flames offensive leader.

Chouinard was a creative offensive force with a deadly accurate shot and soft hands. For a brief time he was considered to be the third best center in the National Hockey League.
Legends of Hockey:
Quote:
Chouinard finally got his chance to play in the NHL on a full-time basis in 1976-77, playing 80 games and scoring 17 goals and 50 points. He improved to 28 goals and 58 points the next year but it was the 1978-79 season when he had the year of his life, scoring 50 goals and 57 assists for 107 points. That excellent year was followed by a pair of 31-goal seasons, the second of which came in Calgary, after the club had re-located there for the 1980-81 season.
C Mickey Roach



5th in Scoring 1923

Legends of Hockey:
Quote:
Mickey Roach was an early example of an American-born player who made it to the NHL. He did so on the strength of his excellent offensive skills and ability to manoeuvre his tiny little frame with great speed and agility.

It wasn't until Roach came to Canada to skate for the Hamilton Tigers of the OHA Seniors that his stick began to heat up again. He finished the 1918-1919 season as the league's top scorer.

The following year, the speedy little centreman joined the Toronto St. Pats of the NHL. Over the next seven years, Roach performed as a steady scorer, especially for the Hamilton Tigers who had joined the NHL by 1920. In 1922-23, in a Tigers' sweater, he put in his personal-best campaign, garnering 25 points in 23 games.
F Shirley Davidson

3rd in Scoring 1896
7th Leading Scorer of the 1890's (27 goals in 39 games)
1895 Stanley Cup Champion
1896 Stanley Cup Champion (December)
1897 Stanley Cup Champion

Davidson was one of the star forwards for the Montreal Victorias in the 1890s. Davidson was noted for his dangerous rushes down the ice. Off the ice, Davidson was also a football star and was an engineer with the Jamaica Street Railway Company and the Dominion Railway Company. He was killed in a boating accident in 1907

Shirley Davidson stood 5' 6" and weighed 150 lbs. He was the outstanding player of the first challenge loss in Febuary and tallied twice to help the Vics regain the Cup in December... He was a swift player noted for his ability to dodge.


D Igor Kravchuk




1988 Olympic Gold Medal
1990 World Championship Gold Medal
1991 World Championship Bronze Medal
1992 Olympic Gold Medal
1992 Stanley Cup Finalist
1998 Olympic Silver Medal
Played in 1999 NHL All-Star Game
2002 Olympic Bronze Medal

Legends of Hockey:
Quote:
An excellent puck-handling defenceman with a good shot from the point, defenceman Igor Kravchuk peaked in the early 1990s. Late in the decade he was a useful role player, but overall his big league career was not as rewarding as many scouts had anticipated.

Kravchuk played with the Yulajev club in both the second and first division over a five year period. Internationally, he played for the USSR at the World Junior Championships, winning bronze in 1985 and gold in 1986. After joining the senior national team he played at the 1987 Canada Cup when the USSR lost a dramatic three game final to the hosts and captured a gold medal at the 1988 Calgary Olympics.

During the 1987-88 season he joined the prestigious Central Red Army team. He won a gold medal with the Soviet Union at the 1990 World Championships and a bronze the next year. Kravchuk played a major role on the 1991 Canada Cup and on the CIS team that won gold at the Albertville Olympics in 1992.

Chosen 71st overall by the Chicago Black Hawks at the 1991 NHL Entry Draft, Kravchuk joined the NHL after Albertville. He scored eight points in 18 playoff games as the Hawks reached the Stanley Cup final for the first time in 19 years.

Kravckuk's mobility suited the speedy Oilers and he scored 50 points in 81 games in 1993-94 to lead all Edmonton defencemen. Much of his work was done on the club's improved power play.

The fast skating game of the Sens suited Kravchuk and he scored 35 points for Ottawa in 1997-98 and was chosen to play for the World Team in the 1998 All-Star Game. He took a regular turn on the Sens' blueline in 1998-99 and helped the club set a franchise record with 103 points.


Last edited by Hedberg: 03-24-2009 at 01:59 PM.
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Old
03-24-2009, 03:50 PM
  #58
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D - Marcus Ragnarsson

Quote:
Originally Posted by vancityluongo
Ragnarsson was a defensive anchor on the Swedish National team. A shutdown specialist, who also had a bit of an edge. Also a key member of the Flyers and Sharks defense for a number of years, he'll be counted on to play a solid defensive game, and make sure his presence is known whenever he steps foot on the ice.
D - Yuri Shatalov
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Summit In 1972
Yuri Shatalov was a steady defenseman....known as a fearless shot-blocker and a fast skater with distinct talent to play impressive physical hockey...he always appeared on the ice in the key moments of the game.
C - Orest Kindrachuk

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
A solid playmaking centre who could play defence and kill penalties, Orest Kindrachuk played over 500 games for three different NHL teams. He topped the 30-assist mark five times in his career and was dangerous on the powerplay and while shorthanded.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Shero
He was the kind of player you wanted out there in the tough situations because he had both the brains and guts.
NHL Career
GM: 594
G: 138
A: 281
P: 419
PIM: 701
+/-: +122

RW - Willy Lindstrom

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Right-winger Willy Lindstrom was an exciting combination of speed and scoring during his eight years in the NHL. He recorded five 20-goal seasons and was very dangerous on the power play. The talented forward was also respected for turning his game up a notch in the post-season.

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03-24-2009, 06:23 PM
  #59
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RW Ran McDonald



A gritty player who was a star in the PCHA - not at the level of the Dunderdales and Foystons, but right there with the Skinners, Wilsons, and Rileys.

- Stanley Cup Finalist (1918, 1919)
- PCHA 1st All-Star Team (1912, 1913, 1914)
- PCHA 2nd All-Star Team (1916)
- Played for all six PCHA Teams
- Top-10 in PCHA goals 4 times (4th, 6th, 6th, 8th)
- Top-10 in PCHA assists twice (6th, 9th)
- 91 goals, 29 assists, 120 points, 197 PIM in 122 PCHA Games
- 4 goals and 6 points in 8 PCHA Playoff/SCF games

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03-24-2009, 06:24 PM
  #60
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LW/C Harry Smith



- This guy was a winner and a leader who was one of the top scorers wherever he went, if not the top scorer. He put in over two goals per game everywhere that he played, outscoring some excellent players along the way, and saved his best for when the cup was on the line. He was sometimes in trouble as his in-game passion would get the better of him. In many ways he is a poor man’s Newsy Lalonde. And he has great bloodlines, hailing from the same parents as Tommy and Alf Smith.

- Stanley Cup Champion (1906, 1909*)
- SOHA leading scorer (1905)
- ECAHA Leading Scorer (1906)
- 4th in ECAHA Scoring (1907)
- WPHL Leading Scorer (1908) - not a top league but outscored brother Tommy 44-32
- In 1909, managed to lead the TPHL in goals, was 3rd in WPHL, and had 9 goals in 4 ECHA games, which projected to 27, 3rd in that league
- 2nd in NHA scoring (1910) - behind only Newsy Lalonde
- 4th in OPHL Scoring (1911)
- NOHL Scoring leader (1912)
- Playoff Scoring Leader (1906, 1909) - had 21 goals in 7 top-level playoff games
- 1st Team All- Star (1907, 1908, 1912) - per SIHR
- 344 goals, 347 PIM in 162 recorded games (172 goals in 83 top level games)
- One of only three available players of the 100 who earned a bio in "The Trail Of the Stanley Cup Vol. 1"

* Wanderers, led by Smith, defended the cup successfully to keep the cup as ECHA property, but had to hand the cup over to Ottawa as the Sens won the ECHA regular season title.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail Of the Stanley Cup, Vol. 1
He looked very much like his brother Alf and had a lot of his fighting characteristics. He was a much better player than Alf during his two years with ottawa and might have been the equal of his brother Tommy, if he might have behaved.

In his first year with the Senators he was a ball of fire and he topped both Russell bowie and Frank McGee in scoring. He was a spectacular star in the famous two-game playoff with the Wanderers for the championship and Stanley Cup. Wanderers had won the first game 9-1 and no odds were quoted on the chances of Ottawa overtaking that lead. nevertheless, in the return match at Ottawa, the Senators tied the round before losing by two goals. This great comeback included five goals by Harry Smith who was personally congratulated at rinkside by the Governor General. This was the high point of Harry's career.

Frank McGee dropped out the next year and Harry took over at center with his brother Alf and Hamby Shore on the wings. Harry played well but Alf was tiring.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail Of the Stanley Cup, Vol. 1 (1909 playoffs)
Harry Smith showed again that when sticking to hockey he was as good as any by scoring five goals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail Of the Stanley Cup, Vol. 1 (1906 finals)
The Smith Brothers skated wild through the Wanderer defense and in succession Harry tallied twice more...
Most Goals In Organized Hockey, 1904-1914 (Harry Smith's Career)
This list only includes players who excelled in the top leagues of the time, it includes all leagues that existed and have stats available, but obviously to include all players who excelled only in lesser leagues would be both exhaustive and pointless

Name Games Goals GPG
H.Smith 160 342 2.14
T.Smith 141 288 2.04
N.Lalonde 120 219 1.83
E.Russell 111 212 1.91
M.Walsh 89 203 2.28
B.Ridpath 118 192 1.63
D.Pitre 158 181 1.15
R.Bowie 53 180 3.40
D.Smith 140 171 1.22
K.Mallen 131 157 1.20
T.Dunderdale 114 156 1.37
D.Kerr 102 151 1.48
J.Hall 146 147 1.01
J.McDonald 123 146 1.19
T.Phillips 63 144 2.29
H.Hyland 90 139 1.54
J.Walker 112 138 1.23
**** ****** 79 135 1.71
H.Jordan 54 134 2.48
J.Malone 99 134 1.35



Most goals only in top-level hockey, 1904-1914
(in each season there was one or two leagues known as the "top" leagues, these were the leagues whose teams owned the cup or frequently challenged for it: CAHL ,FAHL, EC(A)HA, OPHL, CHA, NHA, PCHA - playoffs and cup matches also count)

Name Games Goals GPG
E.Russell 111 212 1.91
T.Smith 91 193 2.12
N.Lalonde 93 179 1.92
M.Walsh 70 166 2.37
R.Bowie 45 153 3.40
H.Smith 76 151 1.99
D.Smith 126 150 1.19
J.McDonald 123 146 1.19
H.Hyland 90 139 1.54
H.Jordan 54 134 2.48
J.Malone 99 134 1.35
D.Kerr 73 117 1.60
F.Glass 107 115 1.07
F.McGee 52 113 2.17
E.Johnson 139 112 0.81
**** ****** 66 107 1.62
D.Pitre 100 104 1.04
A.Smith 63 100 1.59
W.Smaill 118 99 0.84
K.Mallen 81 90 1.11

Harry Smith is 6th in goals and 6th in GPG during this time. (Blair Russell also had 2.06 GPG but not enough total goals to get in the top-20)


Last edited by seventieslord: 03-27-2009 at 03:29 AM.
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03-24-2009, 06:25 PM
  #61
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D Joe Cooper



- 6'2", 200 lbs
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1937, 1944)
- Top-10 in points by defensemen three times (8th, 9th, 9th)

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
...At 6'1" and 200 pounds, Cooper was one of the biggest and strongest players of his day, and he used his physical superiority whenever possible.

In 1935-36, he joined the Philadelphia Ramblers of the CAHL where he was known as one of the toughest opponents to play against. Many opposing forwards dreaded having to rush the net, or, even worse, face Cooper along the back boards. He had a one-game tryout with the NHL's New York Rangers and impressed team officials.

The Rangers recognized this toughness and put him on their roster for the 1936-37 season. In 48 games, he picked up three assists and 42 minutes in penalties. The following season, he scored his first three NHL goals.

In 1938-39, Cooper joined the Chicago Blackhawks but played the majority of the year back in Philadelphia with the Ramblers in the IAHL. In 1939-40, Cooper started 44 games for the Blackhawks where he scored four goals and eleven points. He played another five years in a Blackhawks' uniform before returning to the New York Rangers in 1946-47.

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03-24-2009, 06:27 PM
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Sorry to clutter up the thread guys. As you know, I like to be able to link to my bios separately. They were all in one post originally, so I could post them all at 7 AM.

- I'm not a big Ragnarsson fan, but I don't think he can hurt you either.

- Kindrachuk and Lindstrom are solid picks.

- Shatalov... fantastic pick.

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03-24-2009, 07:33 PM
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damn i was going to pick Cooper today.

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03-24-2009, 07:50 PM
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LW Yevgeny Mayorov

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03-24-2009, 09:46 PM
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C Guy Chouinard - during his 5 year peak he scored at an average rate of 1.22 pts/g. Scored 50 goals in 1979 (4th place), placed 9th,10th in assists and 6th in points. finished 4th in playoff scoring in 1981 with 17 points in 16 games

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03-24-2009, 10:01 PM
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D Barry Gibbs - Aggresive defensemen that placed 9th,15 in scoring.
Captained the 1978-79 Blues
Quote:
Defenceman Barry Gibbs played nearly 800 games for five different team between 1967 and 1980. He was an aggressive defender in his own end and could supply a decent amount of offense from the point.
The steady rearguard spent 5 1/2 years supplying solid two way play on the Stars. In 1971 he was one of best players when Minnesota gave the Montreal Canadiens all they could handle in the Stanley Cup semifinals. Two years later he scored a personal high ten goals and was picked to participate in the NHL All-Star game

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03-25-2009, 01:29 AM
  #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Evil Speaker View Post
C Guy Chouinard - during his 5 year peak he scored at an average rate of 1.22 pts/g. Scored 50 goals in 1979 (4th place), placed 9th,10th in assists and 6th in points. finished 4th in playoff scoring in 1981 with 17 points in 16 games
I picked him earlier in the day.

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03-25-2009, 01:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Evil Speaker View Post
damn i was going to pick Cooper today.
I know you were.

I'm pretty up to speed on offensive defensemen, but I know that this is your life's work, so to speak, so if there's someone I want who's been top-10 in scoring and you're in the draft, I have to get him before you do.

And... Chouinard was taken by Hedberg today.


Last edited by seventieslord: 03-25-2009 at 01:50 AM.
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03-25-2009, 04:57 AM
  #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord
Smith fell into my lap last night. Now that I have him, I'll tell you a story. I really regretted taking Briere in the morning yesterday. Not that he's a bad player, but I got seduced by his playoff numbers since the lockout and then I noticed Juneau just a bit too late. I really hoped he'd last another day but sure enough, leave it to CR to clean up all the guys we talked about in AAA8 / the top-1000 thread So I'm researching and I come across Harry Smith a bunch of times and I keep thinking he has to be taken considering he's led multiple leagues in scoring, and scored over two goals per game, and was tough. Nope, available. So you know how when you discover a player you start to get really suspicious that everyone else knows about him and wants to take him? Yeah, I did that. I set my cell phone alarm so I could hop out of bed at 7 AM and post my pre-written bios. I wouldn't put anything past you guys, especially you, VI. Seriously, if I knew he was available in MLD10, I would not have hesitated to make him a #1 center and captain there. I think he's the star of the draft!
I think not.

Harry Smith was not as tough as Alf. But he had a temper. And he was the slowest player on the Silver Seven, and not one of their "Seven" starters in their heyday, was one of the extras used sometimes.

But Harry had a great shot and was a very eager player, determined, enthusiastic. I imagine a Geoff Courtnall type.

He is a great pick at this level and a decent pick at the AAA level. No way should he start at the MLD level.

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03-25-2009, 08:02 AM
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HC Sparta Praha is pleased to select its top blueliners



Alexei Gusarov, 6'2 183lbs, positionally-solid, skilled defenseman



- played on the top Soviet national team from 1984-1991 incl. Canada Cups ('84, '87, '91)
- 9th all-time in games played on Soviet national team with 186 games (18 goals)
- multiple world championship winner (1986, '88, '90)
- Olympic Gold medalist (1988)
- Stanley Cup champion (1996)
- in 1998, Gusarov and Foote as a tandem led the NHL in shorthanded time with almost 4 minutes-per-game average each (as per pnep stats)
http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?p...v#post10794757

Quote:
... a fine positional player with an ability to make useful passes on offense. A veteran of several years in the Soviet League, he adapted quickly to the rigours of the NHL season and accepted a variety of roles.. the powerful Central Red Army of Moscow. He was a top player on the club for seven years and helped the USSR win the gold medal at the Calgary Olympics in 1988.... The steady rearguard provided stability on the Nords' blueline and was part of the club's resurgence from the league's doormat to a first place finish in the Lockout-shortened regular season in 1995. The next year Gusarov remained with the franchise when it relocated to Colorado. During the 1996 post-season he provided savvy and nine assists while helping the Avalanche win the Stanley Cup. He took a regular shift on the powerful club until the early stages of the 2000-01 season... picked up by the St. Louis Blues as they prepared to make a statement in the Western Conference playoffs. He was a useful player in 16 games as a the Blues reached the semifinals... retired as one of the few members of the Triple Gold Club, having won the 1989 IIHF World Championship, the 1996 Stanley Cup, and the Olympic gold medal in 1988.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net:8080/...p?player=10585

---------------



Igor Romishevsky, 5'10, 176lbs. elite level defenseman



- on Soviet national team from 1965-1972 (15 goals in 129 games)
- two-time Olympic gold medalist (1968, '72)
- four-time world championship winner (1968, '69, '70, '71)
- three-time 2nd team all-star in Soviet league (1968, '69, '71) (126 goals in 437 games)

Quote:
...absence of several world-class players affected the performance of the Soviets in the 1972 Summit Series. Obviously, the Olympic Champions Igor Romishevsky, Vitaly Davydov and, especially, Anatoly Firsov could have been a powerful addition to the Soviet team in the 1972 Summit.
http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1...ts/howru72.htm

----------------



Alfred Kuchevsky, 5'11, 175 lbs star defenseman

- three-time Soviet 1st team All Star (1953, 1954, 1960)
- two time world championship winner (1954, 1956)
- two-time Olympic medalist, Gold (1956), Bronze (1960)

----------------



Genrikh Sidorenkov, 5'10, 185 lbs. star defenseman

- three-time Soviet 1st team All Star (1959, 1960, 1961)
- nine years on Soviet national team (1954-1962) (15 goals in 107 games)
- 42 goals in 310 Soviet league games
- two-time Olympic medalist, gold (1956), bronze (1960)
- two time world championship winner, Gold (1954, '56)

---------------

NOTE: In 1960 the two greatest Soviet blueliners were Kuchevsky and Sidorenkov, each three-time 1st team all-stars, and both on the 1956 Olympic gold medal team. They will be paired up for Sparta Praha.


Last edited by VanIslander: 03-25-2009 at 08:16 AM.
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03-25-2009, 08:03 AM
  #71
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LW/D/RW Charles Tobin



(photo is really not available - believe me, I looked hard.)

Tobin has the versatility and talent to be a 2nd line scoring LW, a 3rd line checking LW, the same at RW, or a defenseman. Given that there is no depth out there in scoring LWs, and quite a bit in checking LWs (see below) and he was best as a scoring winger, I am leaning toward that.

- 5'10", 160 lbs.
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1916, 1920, 1922)
- PCHA 1st All-Star Team (1918)
- Played for 10 seasons in the PCHA, spent 7 seasons bouncing around before that
- Played for 5 PCHA teams, scoring 101 goals and 30 assists in 183 games
- 3rd, 6th, 7th, 8th in PCHA goals
- 7th, 10th in PCHA assists
- Portland Rosebuds all-time Games, Goals, Points leader
- Started as a defenseman, moved to forward later
- Last bio-worthy skater in The Trail, Vol. 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail Of the Stanley Cup, Vol. 1
Charles Tobin played ten years in the PCHA, during which time he was with five teams, missing only Spokane. Three times he was with a champion in a Stanley Cup series but never on a winner.

He was like Fred Taylor in one respect in that during his first three years he played quite a bit of defense with Ernie Johnson for New Westminster and Portland, alternating at rover. he had his three best years at Portland playing (at RW) on a line with Tom Dunderdale and Fred Harris.

Tobin was a fine stickhandler and was chosen All-Star LW of the PCHA in 1918.


Last edited by seventieslord: 03-25-2009 at 01:19 PM.
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03-25-2009, 09:11 AM
  #72
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Tucson selects:

C Darryl Sutter




Scored 40 goals in 1981
43 points in 51 playoff games
Chicago Blackhawks Captain 1982 - 1987

Chicago Blackhawks Legends:

Quote:
Darryl's best season was his rookie NHL season of 1980-81. He scored 40 goals and 62 points. Although he had probably the softest hands of the family, Darryl knew that he would have a tough time duplicating 40 goals again. The Hawks were a weak team and many of Darryl's goals came with the game already well in hand for the other team. Plus Darryl played a lot with excellent center Tom Lysiak, who was winding down his fine career.

There was little doubt that Darryl could score goals though. Darryl was on pace to score another 40 in year 2, but he missed half the season when he took a Doug Wilson slapshot to the face, crushing his cheek bone and eye socket. He would score 31 goals in 1982-83.

That year proved to be his last injury free campaign. Over the next 4 years Darryl constantly pushed the 20 goal despite playing in an average of 50 games a year, many of those games in great pain.

In 1984-85 Darryl was the talk of the playoffs as he scored 12 goals in 15 playoff games, breaking Bobby Hull's team record for goals in the playoffs in the process.
RW Wayne Babych



Scored 54 Goals in 1981
Played in 1981 All-Star Game

St. Louis Blues Legends:
Quote:
Wayne Babych was on the verge of becoming the dominant power forward of his generation. Then disaster struck.
At 5'11" and 190lbs, he was quite a bit smaller than his brother, but his upper body strength was second to none. He could dominate the boards and corners and he hit like a truck.
Babych would score 26 goals, 36 assists and 63 points, all then-rookie records for the franchise. He was a finalist in rookie of the year voting that saw the Calder Trophy go to Smith of the Minnesota North Stars.Babych was as big of a star in St. Louis as any athlete let alone hockey player. He would sign a 4 year contract worth over $400,000 with a $125,000 signing bonus, huge dollars for 1981.

That would be the apex of Babych's career. He could have been the best power winger of the 1980s. He could skate, shoot, score, hit and fight. He was a highly underrated fighter who was not afraid of the odd dust-up no matter who his opponent was.

In a pre-season game Babych dropped the gloves with one of the biggest, baddest goons of the day. Just as Babych was about to throw a punch, the linesman intervened, grabbing his arm. Babych's rotator cuff was severely ripped.

Doctors tried a lengthy rehabilitation process followed by surgery to take the rotator cuff apart and rebuild it. They were never able to properly fix it, but Babych tried to play on, despite the pain.

But he was never the same. He even worsened the injury due to more fighting.
C Murray Craven


1985 Stanley Cup Finalist
1987 Stanley Cup Finalist
1994 Stanley Cup Finalist

Legends of Hockey:
Quote:
Craven suited up for all 80 games in the 1984-85 season, responding with 26 goals and 35 assists for 61 points. He was also instrumental in helping the Flyers advance to the Stanley Cup finals where they lost in five games to the defending champion Edmonton Oilers. In 19 post-season games that spring, Craven netted four goals and ten points in 19 games.

Just two years after that strong post-season run, Craven and the Flyers were back in the Cup final once again facing the powerhouse Edmonton Oilers. While they made it an extremely close finals, the Oilers edged out a tense seven-game victory to claim their third Stanley Cup in four years. Losing that Cup final was especially hard on Craven and the rest of the Flyers, who felt they had the team to win it all that year.

From an individual standpoint, Craven's best seasons came as a member of the Flyers. In 1987-88, he hit the 30-goal plateau while counting 76 points.


Last edited by Hedberg: 03-25-2009 at 12:17 PM.
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03-25-2009, 09:16 AM
  #73
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Bah! I was taking sutter tomorrow for sure.

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03-25-2009, 12:23 PM
  #74
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Tucson selects RW/LW Yevgeny Mishakov



1968 Olympic Gold Medal
1968 World Championships Gold Medal
1969 World Championships Gold Medal
1970 World Championships Gold Medal
1971 World Championships Gold Medal
1972 Olympic Gold Medal
Participated in 1972 Summit Series
49 Goals in 91 International Games

International Hockey Legends:
Quote:
Mishakov is not remembered as one of Russia's most elite hockey players, though he did help the national team win 4 world championships and 2 Olympic gold medals between 1968 and 1972. In that time he scored an impressive 29 goals in 35 contests, despite playing on a checking line. He also played in 400 Soviet League games, scoring 183 times. Mishakov gained notoriety during the 1972 Summit Series for engaging in a fight, a true rarity in the Russian game. He and Rod Gilbert got in the tournament's only fight, which was something completely new to Soviet hockey.

While fighting was heavily frowned upon in Russia, Mishakov was never reprimanded. In fact Mishakov, who had little choice but to drop the gloves when the usually mild-mannered Rod Gilbert began pummelling him, was recognized for sending a message to Canada by fighting back.

"We always criticize our players for fighting," commented Russian sports writer Lev Lebedev of Pravda. "In this series we didn't do that. If our players didn't stand up to the Canadians, there wouldn't have been enough players to complete the game! After the fight between Mishakov and Gilbert, the professionals began to realize that Russians can fight too."

Mishakov was one Soviet player who played full out. He was an energetic and exuberant forward who showed unbridled spirit, often on the penalty kill.

"The playing fury and fighting spirit of this normally reserved person are really astounding," said Vladislav Tretiak of Mishakov, in the book Kings of the Ice. "In workouts he's possessed and in games he can, if need be, spend five and even 10 shifts on the ice without substitution. And when he is replaced by another player, he'll sit on the bench as if nothing has happened, wink at one guy, nudge another in the ribs as though he has just had a good rest."


Last edited by Hedberg: 03-25-2009 at 12:28 PM.
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03-25-2009, 01:21 PM
  #75
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RW Don Saleksi



- 6'3", 205 lbs
- Stanley Cup (1974, 1975)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1976)
- A decent 30 points in 82 playoff games

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Saleski was one of the famed Broad Street Bullies. Along with Bob "Hound Dog" Kelly, Dave "The Hammer" Schultz, and "Moose" Dupont, Saleski was one of the noted goons on a team that knew no rule book. Nicknamed "Big Bird" because his wild hair reminded many of the Sesame Street character, Saleski would be sure to enter upon or create any fracas involving another Flyers player, whether it was necessary or not. Any fracas included with fans, which in 1976 got him charged in Toronto, though nothing ever came of the charges.

...Even on the ice Saleski wasn't nearly as bad as his reputation. He only had 629 PIMs in 543 NHL games, and after his first season or two he curtailed his fighting, largely because he wasn't that good at it. Schultz suggested in his autobiography by calling him " a big sonofagun who couldn't fight very well but would throw his weight around" and "he had this wild-man routine to make himself more scary than he really was."

He was a 20 goal scorer who was utilized as a shutdown winger. Often teamed with center Orest Kindrachuk, he was often assigned the task of controlling top wingers on the other team.

“I never considered myself a tough guy. I was more of an instigator. I caused a lot of problems and Dave Shultz would finish them off. I was competitive and wanted to win, so I did whatever I could to help the team,” he told philadelphiaflyers.com.

..."When I think of memories I think of the team and how we had a common vision. We supported each other and we really had this bond. We still do. I don’t see the guys that often, but when we do see each other there is the feeling of excitement. It is almost like a brotherhood.”


Last edited by seventieslord: 03-25-2009 at 03:07 PM.
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