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ATD10/MLD10/AAA10/Double-A The Undrafted Players Thread (arguably Top-1000 All Time)

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Old
03-29-2009, 11:19 PM
  #26
God Bless Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vancityluongo View Post
I was thinking Kesler too. He'll definitely have a Selke or two in the next few years, and by then will probably have accomplished enough to be selected in the ATD. Zach Parise was deservedly selected in the AA draft, and I think he should make the next MLD in some capacity. Same with Alex Semin who I don't think was selected either. Not the same type of player as the other two, but probably at least on par or better than a lot of the softer wingers selected.

Edit: Another current Philly center in the same mold as the first two mentioned, Jeff Carter could be added into the mix as well.
I think Semin's more talented than Parise, but I'd say Parise is more likely to make the jump because a) he's more consistent; and b) he's more durable. You know what you're going to get from Parise. Semin's more prone to slumps, and he's usually good for one injury per year.

The betting here is that Parise - who has three straight seasons above 60 points, and is challenging 100 points this year - will be in the MLD within a year if he can follow up this season with a big playoff, or another season in the 80 point range.

Carter's a one-year wonder as of right now. I love the guy - he's the big offensive centre every team covets - but when it comes to modern centres, I want a guy with more than one 60-point season. Pivonka deserves to be picked. Was Mike Bullard picked?

The reason why I suggested Kesler could be in one of the non-ATD events soon is that modern or active defensive forwards tend to get elevated to the MLD a little faster compared to offensive forwards. Easy explanation, too: the Selke Trophy. We have an award to judge defensive forwards. (Although I've had my public qualms with Selke voting in the past). And if you win a Selke, it almost guarantees a spot in the ATD, which isn't necessarily a good thing.

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Old
03-29-2009, 11:22 PM
  #27
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I don't have the time to go naming players right now, but a few comments...

- Forbes Kennedy, Michal Pivonka, and Rob Zamuner are the only guys I'm big fans of who are mentioned so far. If I named a 24-man roster of available guys, Pivonka could be the 2nd-4th line center or a spare. Zamuner would be my 3rd line LW, and Kennedy can be a 3rd-4th line C.

- I knew ES would be in here to drop some names of leftover defensemen with decent scoring records. Those would all be decent options. Zalapski, named by Pit, was one of very few remaining with three top-15s.

I could name some names right now but I'd rather accompany them with some info at the same time rather than name dropping and then coming back later to back it up.

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03-29-2009, 11:41 PM
  #28
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*I didn't realize Forbes Kennedy is still an option. Very good defensive player. Was on my list for the MLD, but couldn't pass up George Gee.

*Zarley Zalapski had the ability to be an ATD defenceman. A gifted offensive defenceman who, when he was motivated, could skate and move the puck and quarterback the power play and even log big minutes against an opponent's top line. One of the guys from Canada's 88 Olympic team who had a lot of hype. But he was maddeningly inconsistent. Seasons of 54, 57 and 65 points should have been just the beginning for him. Instead, he played 77 games in the show after the 1995-96 season. What should have been his prime wound up being the start of a tour of Europe. He's a guy I'd never think of picking, because he always, always, always left you wanting more.

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03-30-2009, 07:27 PM
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by God Bless Canada View Post
He's a guy I'd never think of picking, because he always, always, always left you wanting more.
Well, you weren't in the AAA or AA draft so you might not be aware but Zalapski is almost the pick of the litter as far as offensive defensemen are concerned, after 1284 picks. Pretend we started a new draft now, look at everyone who's been taken - who do you pick to be your puck rusher and PP guy? You won't do much better than Zarley.

As for O'Neill..... no thanks! This guy had one excellent season when he was 7th in the NHL in goals and led the league in hits. He had one warrior playoff run with Carolina and looked primed to break into superstardom. Then the Leafs got him after the lockout. He was just as slow as Allison, except for him it was a lack of effort as opposed to ability, because he used to be able to fly. He wouldn't move his legs to get open, he wouldn't move his legs to make hits, he wouldn't move his legs to get back into the play, and he wouldn't move his legs to catch the guy two feet ahead of him, choosing to hook him instead. That's why he didn't do too bad on the PP. Not a lot of leg-moving required.

To this day I maintain that he's the worst post-lockout Leaf player* and on a team that is about to miss the playoffs for four straight seasons, that says a lot.

* obviously based on expectations and role on the team. He's clearly better than Khavanov, Berg, Wilm, Suglobov(!!!???!!!) and many others.

I have 33 forwards, 13 defensemen, 10 goalies, 2 coaches, and 2 great spares. I don't exactly want to flood this thread but they're all pretty worthy players who could have feasibly been MLD guys (many have) Even doing two rosters with three goalies per roster, leaves out four good ones! What do I do?

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Old
04-01-2009, 11:59 PM
  #30
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Seventieslord's first all-undrafted team:

After all the research that went into the ATD, MLD, AAA, and AA drafts, these are the players I'd target if there was another draft with the next best players available.

a few have been mentioned already...

First line:

LW Geoff Sanderson

- Though he has never been a top-10 goalscorer, Sanderson is the only remaining player who has been a top-20 goalscorer four times. Given the lack of depth at LW, he could have been an MLD pick. Just when you think he's finished, he comes back with a great goal total - 30 in 2001, 34 in 2003, and 25 in 2006. 1999 Stanley Cup Finalist.



C Viktor Polupanov



- Polupanov had a short career, but he was a scoring phenom. He has two Russian league AST selections - in 1957 and 1968. They are second team selections but he is the only player left with two of them. He placed 3rd, 3rd, and 8th in Russian league scoring, and has an excellent 21-19-40 in 28 official International games. He won Gold in every tournament he played in - the 1966, 1967, and 1970 WCs, and the 1968 Olympics. He led the 1967 WC in goals, and was 2nd in assists and points. He was 2nd on the Russians in goals, assists, and points in those Olympics. 154 goals in 293 games in the Russian League. I put him here between two goalscorers as I feel there is little doubt as to his playmaking ability based on his international play.

RW Tommy Williams



- A wild man off the ice, Tommy Williams was a good right winger for 15 pro seasons. He was a decent goalscorer, making the top-15 once, but his best skill was his playmaking. In 1970, with the North Stars, he actually placed 3rd in the NHL. He finished with an impressive 430 points in 663 NHL games, half of them in the O6 era. He also had 89 points in 139 WHA games. He won an Avco cup in 1973 and in his limited pro playoff experience, scored 27 points in 29 games. Williams was one of the leading scorers in the USA's first Miracle On Ice in the 1960 Olympics, and also performed very well in the 1959 olympics, with a combined 19 points in 15 games in those tournaments.

Second line:

LW Harry Meeking



- Meeking was known as Hurricane Harry due to his fine skating. He enjoyed a fairly long, solid career. He was a cup winner in 1918 with Toronto and was one of their top players with 6 points in 8 games in that playoff run. He also won the 1925 cup with Victoria, and played for the 1926 Cup too. He is a two-time 2nd team all-star in the PCHA. Twice placed 7th in PCHA goals, and was once 6th in points. 4th in NHL assists and 9th in points in the 1918 season. Very balanced offensively. 118 points in 251 pro games, and 7 more in 34 pro playoff games.

C Jimmy Carson



- Carson started off his career with a bang, making the all-rookie team and then finishing in the top-10 in both goals and points the next two seasons, becoming the second youngest player to score 50 goals in a season in the process. Between those two seasons he was the centerpiece in the Wayne Gretzky trade... well, out of living assets, anyway. Carson scored 49+ goals in both those seasons and didn't approach that mark again. He did, however, have seasons of 34 and 37 goals later on with Detroit and LA, and he helped the Kings to the 1993 Finals. Finished with 561 points in 626 games, and 32 more in 55 playoff games. Didn't have the greatest attitude, but his talent was undeniable. The goalscoring version of Dan Quinn.

RW Sergei Svetlov



- Svetlov was a skilled Russian forward in the 1980's. Aside from being 5th in points twice in the Russian league, he wasn't always among the league leaders but he was always called upon to represent his country - 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988. He had 33 points in 52 games against some pretty tough competition including two Canada cups and an Olympics. He won three WC Gold medals. He is among the leaders in undrafted players in games and goals with the National team. 137 goals and 149 assists in 372 Russian league games.


Last edited by seventieslord: 04-04-2009 at 11:42 PM.
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Old
04-02-2009, 12:01 AM
  #31
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Defensemen, goalies, and coach to follow in next bunch. Then, bottom two lines and extras.

Comments welcomed.

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Old
04-02-2009, 12:08 PM
  #32
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Oh wow, I totally missed until now that Geoff Sanderson was even taken. (MLD, cumulative pick #908) I've thought he was the best goalscorer available since about the start of the AA draft - no wonder I did - he was never available!

Sanderson's 1st line replacement is...

LW/RW Alexander Skvortsov



- 244 goals in 580 Russian League games. According to Chidlovski, is the leader among undrafted players, with 57 goals and 154 games with the national team,. Chidlovski's site includes exhibition international matches which may have been less competitive. In sanctioned tournaments, he has 27 goals, 18+ assists (they are not available for three mid-80's tournaments, my guess is about 15 are missing) and 45+ points in 69 games. He played in three Canada cups (winning one), two Olympics (winning a gold and losing to the Miracle On Ice), four World Championships (four golds), a super-series, and a Challenge Cup. He led the Russians in scoring in the '79 super series. In a few Russian league seasons his stats are not complete but I know for sure that he has been 6th, 6th*, and 8th* in the 1980's against some very tough competition there. In the * seasons, he was just one point out of 4th.

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Old
04-03-2009, 02:25 AM
  #33
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The Defensive Corps

D Igor Stelnov



- Stelnov had great size - 6'0", 210 lbs. He was a no-nonsense defensive defenseman who played for CSKA Moskow for 11 seasons from 1979-1989. He was called on for numerous international competitions, including the 1984 and 1988 Olympics, the 1984 and 1987 Canada Cups, two WJCs and two WCs. He won two WC Gold medals, and two olympic Golds. He played 409 Russian league games and represented Russia internationally 153 times in total.

D Keith Carney



- Carney was a #3 defenseman for a long, solid, 1000 game career. He played great defense and was able to move the puck and provide small amounts of offense. Ice time stats available show that he was always near the top of his team's D-men in ice time right up until 2004. Carney spent more time on the ice in the 2004 playoffs than any other player on Anaheim in their 2003 Finals Run, and more per game than any New Jersey defenseman, including Stevens and Niedermayer. Carney is a career +164, a number that holds up well when adjusted (+158, 70th all-time)

D Zarley Zalapski



- Zalapski was an offensive defenseman who has some of the best point production credentials among remaining players. As already mentioned, he has been 11th, 12th, 12th among defensemen in points. He may have always left you wanting more, but what he gave you wan't bad, either. According to LOH.net, He was a great skater with speed and agility.

D Richard Matvichuk



- Matvichuk was another very solid and consistent defenseman who, in his prime, was 3rd in icetime on a very good Dallas team for five of the first six seasons when ice time was tracked. He has an immense amount of playoff experience - 123 games - and won a cup in two trips to the finals. Great size - 6'3", 215 lbs.

D Shawn Chambers



- Chambers had a relatively short career of just 625 games over 13 seasons. But in that time, he contributed to two Stanley Cup wins and went to the finals with the 1991 North Stars. In all, he played in 94 playoff games. Chambers could defend, and was useful on the powerplay. He had a respectable 235 career points, and topped 21 points eight times, with only a major injury stopping that from becoming a ten-year streak. GF and GA stats show that he was frequently used on both special teams. His value was recognized when he was named Team USA's 7th defenseman at the 1996 World Cup. (he played one game)

D Scott Hannan



- Hannan has been one of the toughest and best defensive defensemen in the NHL for over half a decade now - a poor man's Robyn Regehr. He just turned 30 but already has 67 playoff games under his belt thanks to playing in the second round six times. Hannan was a regular on Team Canada's 2004 World Cup winning team. At 6'1" and 225 lbs, Hannan can clear the crease and kill a ton of penalties. He has had 21+ points five times.


Last edited by seventieslord: 04-04-2009 at 11:39 PM.
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04-03-2009, 02:25 AM
  #34
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Third Line:

LW Rob Zamuner




- Zamuner was a great defensive forward, probably the best one left at LW. He finished 7th in 1997 selke voting behind great names like Peca, Forsberg, and Lehtinen, and was also 13th the year before. But he was better than those records indicate - he didn't score enough to get the recognition he deserved. He was so highly regarded for his defensive ability, that he was a surprise selection to the 1998 Canadian Olympic team. He was decent offensively too, finishing with 311 points, and played in two world championships. At 6'3. 203, he had pretty good size as well.

C Forbes Kennedy



- A tough little player who once led the NHL in PIMs. Known for being good defensively. Although he was pugilistic, checking and penalty killing were his main duties. Unfortunately he was buried on bad teams for much of his career, and only got into 12 playoff games. He was called feisty and aggressive, and his legacy will always be his part in the brawl that followed Pat Quinn's massive hit on Bobby Orr in the 1969 playoffs.

RW Billy Harris



- No, not the Billy Harris that VI drafted in the AAA draft - this is the one the Isles drafted 1st overall in 1972. Although he never lived up to 1st overall billing, he had a long and productive carreer, scoring 558 points in 897 games, and 38 more in 71 games. He was traded in order to get Butch Goring, the missing piece of the Isles' dynasty puzzle. "Players" describes Harris as being "a good two way player. He also had good size and knew how to use it." Harris was a durable player who played 7 consecutive seasons without missing a game.

Fourth line

LW Pete Babando




- Believe it or not, but we are so far into this draft, that Pete Babando, he of the two top-15s and three top-20s in goal scoring, is almost the most accomplished goalscorer remaining. Babando played on a defensive line with the Detroit Red wings (see below for one of his linemates) and scored a Stanley Cup winning goal in game 7 OT, shortly after the Rangers' Nick Mickoski hit the post. Babando had good all-around ability and scored 159 points in 351 games, and 6 more in 13 playoff games. He stuck around in the minors until age 41, frequently topping 100 points in a season.

C Alexander Uvarov



- The centerpiece of what would be a pretty good MLD 4th line. First, Uvarov had talent - he was 2nd, 3rd, 3rd, 5th, and 6th in Russian league scoring. In all, he had 202 goals in 259 Russian League games, but from his bio in Kings Of the Ice, it appears his best talents were in playmaking, defensive play and teamwork: "He had speed, a smooth skating style and stamina... quickly mastered the art of handling the puck... had all the requirements - speed, technique, powerful shots on goal, and an ability to help out on defense... had an outstanding ability to think on the ice. He controlled the game and orchestrated play by speeding up or slowing down the pace as needed.... had excellent peripheral vision... quickly assessed the situation... fed his partners at the right moment for a breakaway... his teammates would score on his brilliant passes while he remained in the background... had a knack for being in the right place at the right time... could conceal his intentions on the ice, baffling his opponents... would stop as if looking for someone to pass to, and just when it looked like he had missed the chance, he flipped it over to a teammate, who would score a goal... another special talent was versatility... his line attacked aggressively and scored the most goals domestically... when on the national team he became the shutdown center, neutralizing opposing stars... strategy was to keep the puck away from the opposition using a series of short, swift passes... The 1956 Olympic gold medal game was practically won on two goals scored on passes from Uvarov... a team player of the highest caliber, always placing the team's interests above his own... was team captain for 11 seasons in a row, and played until age 38.

RW Gerry Couture



- Couture played on a defensive line with Pete Babando in Detroit, going to the finals with them in 1949, and winning in 1950. Couture is one of just four players remaining who have been top-20 in goals three times. (he was top-10 once and top-15 three times, linemate Babando and the upcoming Briden are the others) - Couture had great size, especially for the 1950s - 6'2", 185 lbs. He played in the 1950 All-star game as well. Couture started his career just after the war ended and was out of the NHL 7 years later in 1954. He put up several great seasons in the minors after leaving.


Last edited by seventieslord: 04-04-2009 at 11:46 PM.
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Old
04-03-2009, 02:31 AM
  #35
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Comments welcomed.

Goalies, coaches, extras to follow tomorrow.

I'll be doing three teams!

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Old
04-03-2009, 07:19 PM
  #36
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Just started reading thru this & find it interesting. Forbes kennedy getting so much love is kind of surprising. Don't think he was any better than these guys (don't think they have ever been picked);

Nick Mickoski
12 seasons in the orig 6. Had one 20g season & 3 at 19g when 20g meant you were a star.

Jack McIntyre
10 orig 6 seasons. High of 18 goals & several times 15+

Earl Balfour

7 seasons. Exceptional PKer

honorable mention: Billy Dea, Billy MacNeil, Bill dineen

Sure I can come up with several more when I have time..

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04-03-2009, 08:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pappyline View Post
Jack McIntyre
10 orig 6 seasons. High of 18 goals & several times 15+
I have a very hard tiem believing that McIntyre was not selected. I would welcome him on any of my MLD teams without any doubt.

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04-03-2009, 09:13 PM
  #38
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Quote:
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I have a very hard tiem believing that McIntyre was not selected. I would welcome him on any of my MLD teams without any doubt.
He was selected in Round 12 of the AAA draft.

Nick Mickoski was also selected in the AAA draft (9th round)

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04-03-2009, 09:14 PM
  #39
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I have a very hard tiem believing that McIntyre was not selected. I would welcome him on any of my MLD teams without any doubt.
He was drafted in the AAA by the Pat Habs.

Mickoski gone too.

EDIT: beat to the punch.

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04-03-2009, 09:23 PM
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Ok, so McIntyre & mickoski have been picked in AAA drafts. IMO. they should definitely go at least in MLD drafts if not as 4th liners in the major draft.

Has larry Popein ever been drafted. he spent 6 years as the first line centre between bathgate & prentice.

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04-04-2009, 12:14 AM
  #41
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Quote:
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I think Semin's more talented than Parise, but I'd say Parise is more likely to make the jump because a) he's more consistent; and b) he's more durable. You know what you're going to get from Parise. Semin's more prone to slumps, and he's usually good for one injury per year.

The betting here is that Parise - who has three straight seasons above 60 points, and is challenging 100 points this year - will be in the MLD within a year if he can follow up this season with a big playoff, or another season in the 80 point range.
Personally, I see Parise getting a Hart nomination and a 2nd team all-star this year...

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04-04-2009, 02:02 AM
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seventieslord
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pappyline View Post
Ok, so McIntyre & mickoski have been picked in AAA drafts. IMO. they should definitely go at least in MLD drafts if not as 4th liners in the major draft.

Has larry Popein ever been drafted. he spent 6 years as the first line centre between bathgate & prentice.
McIntyre and Mickoski are both on my 3rd and 4th lines on my AAA team which is currently in the finals. Sounds like you should go to that series thread and make some comments!

And yeah, I think Kennedy is the best guy for a 3rd line now, but I agree that Mickoski and McIntyre are both better, which is why I took both.

Popein is actually slated as a scoring center on my all-undrafted 3rd team... stay tuned.

As for Balfour - I looked really closely at him... almost made my 3rd team.. but there are just a couple too many guys that I like better right now.

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04-04-2009, 04:02 PM
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The goalies

G Reggie Lemelin




- Lemelin has a really impressive Vezina voting record. He finished as runner-up in 1984 to the rookie, Barrasso, and even had more first place votes. He was 3rd the next year, and also finished 4th, 7th, 7th. He was even 8th in hart voting in 1983. He finished 4th, 5th, and 9th in sv% in the years it was recorded, which excludes 1981 and 1983, when he was potentially top-10 as well. He was an impressive 262-136-53 in the regular season and though he suffered some playoff disappointments, he was outstanding in the 1988 playoffs after taking over for Andy Moog. He stopped 89.5% of shots that playoff year when the league average was just .869. He also performed well in the 1981, 1984, and 1985 playoff in a losing cause.

G Daren Puppa



- Puppa was actually the 1990 Vezina runner-up to Patrick Roy, making the second all-star team. He was also third in voting in 2006, behind two undeserving candidates. Some have said he should have won the award that season as he helped the lightning to their first-ever playoff berth. At 6'4", 205 lbs, he took up a lot of net. He almost always had a sv% above the league average, usually significantly above. In all, he was top-6 in sv% three times. Puppa didn't get much of a chance in the playoffs, sporting a career 4-9 record.

G Earl Robertson



- How many starting Stanley Cup winning goalies are left? How many 2nd All-Star team goalies are left? Robertson did both in his short career. He's also been 4th and 5th in Hart voting. Robertson made his living bailing out some bad teams in his last three seasons, and was actually a .500 goalie over his first two years with the Americans before the team went into decline. Robertson won the 1937 cup with Detroit before he had even played in the regular season, and sports a respectable 7-7 playoff record with a 1.75 GAA. The Trail Of the Stanley Cup, Vol. 2 described him as the hero of the deciding game of the 1937 Finals. The only knock on him is his lack of longevity.

Extras

D/LW Wilf Loughlin



- Clem's brother and the lesser of the two Loughlins, Wilf is a pretty good player in his own right. He had excellent size - 6'2", 200 lbs for a guy born in 1896 is massive - like 6'6", 240 nowadays. He was a 2nd team all-star in the PCHA in 1921. His pro totals of 22-14-36 in 139 games, don't appear all that impressive but he was twice the 2nd-highest scoring blueliner in the PCHA, behind Lloyd Cook both times. LOH.net describes him as a versatile player and notes his multi-positional usefulness. It also says that for the Victoria Cougars, he "provided an important mix of offense and defence" and "played a utility role" for the St. Pats in 1924.

RW/D Yuri Krylov



- A 1956 USSR All-Star, this versatile player represented the Soviets in 70 International games, 37 of which were significant, and scored 15 goals. He scored 140 goals in 344 Russian League games, and placed 5th and 6th in scoring in 1955 and 1956. See what Kings Of the Ice has to say about him: "...immediately caught the attention of Soviet hockey fans when he stepped onto the ice in the Dynamo lineup and showed off his explosive starting speed and extraordinary stability on the ice. Although not very tall, he was strong and had broad shoulders. It was a rare bodycheck that could knock him off his feet. He had teriffic maneuverability and could stop on a dime. It was common to see him streaking away from his pursuer and then all of a sudden put on the brakes. The unprepared pursuer would zip past him, then he gained a couple of seconds to pass to his partner... a formidable forward, though not a natural scorer... powerful, and often unexpected, shot... didn't shun tough body contact and often seemed to seek it out. Tossing caution to the wind, he would thinkl nothing of crashing into tough defensemen who were barring his way to the net... played without shoulder pads for a long time... was one of the few forwards who worked as hard at defense as at offense. Meeting his opponents at the blueline, he was ingenious at taking away the puck, and he would block shots with his body. When he lost some of his speed due to age, he switched over to defense...even in his new position, his performance was exceptional... a never-say-die player... when other players facing a hopeless score would go through the motions, Krylov maintained a professional approach, came out on the ice and never allowed himself to take it easy...gave his all right to the end of every game, never holding back or settling for second best.


The coach:

Emile Francis



- Francis was a well-respected coach for the better part of two decades. He helped to turn the sad-sack Rangers around and got them to the 1972 finals. He has tons of experienced, having coached 778 games with a really nice .574 win%. He is 39-50 in the playoffs and is in the HHOF as a builder.


And that completes my first All-Unselected team. Players with a * were mentioned in this thread already:

Alexander Skvortsov - Viktor Polupanov - Tommy Williams
Harry Meeking - Jimmy Carson - Sergei Svetlov
Rob Zamuner* - Forbes Kennedy* - Billy Harris
Pete Babando - Alexander Uvarov - Gerry Couture

Igor Stelnov - Keith Carney
Zarley Zalapski* - Richard Matvichuk
Shawn Chambers - Scott Hannan

Reggie Lemelin
Daren Puppa
Earl Robertson

Spares:
D/LW Wilf Loughlin
RW/D Yuri Krylov

Coach:
Emile Francis


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04-04-2009, 04:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
I can think of a few....

Left winger Sergei Yashin scored 35 goals on the Soviet national team between 1982-89, winning two world championships, an Olympic gold and played in the 1984 Canada Cup.
This guy was going to make my team but the more I look, the less special he looks. The highest he ever placed in Russian League scoring is 9th. He may have scored 35 goals internationally when you count all the exhibition games Chidlovski counts, but in official tournaments he played 41 games with 7 goals and 9 assists. The only time he was ever close to the leading scorer on the National team was when he was 5th with 4 assists in the 1984 Canada Cup. There are much better choices - Skvortsov, Svetlov, Polupanov, and a few more I will cover shortly.

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04-04-2009, 06:09 PM
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Second Team

First Line

LW Archie "Bones" Briden




- Briden was an underrated player. He was named a PCHA 2nd team all-star twice in 1923 and 1924, though he had only 7 goals in the first year. 1924 was his best season, when he was 6th in the PCHA in goals and 8th in points. The next year in the WCHL he was 6th in goals and 7th in points, all behind drafted players and ahead of many others. He was the top-scoring LW in the league but did not make the all-star team. The following year he slipped to 14 goals, still good for 9th in the WHL, again, behind all drafted players. This all may not sound that special, but Briden had a decent start to his pro career in the NHL in 1918 before leaving to serve in WW1 for two seasons. Then when he came back, he played in the Alberta Big-4 league. He finished 3rd in scoring one year, and 2nd the next. The other top players in this league? ATDers Duke Keats, Barney Stanley, Herb Gardiner, Red Dutton, and Joe Simpson, MLDers Harry Oliver & Gord Fraser, and AAA/AA draftees Art Gagne & Bob Trapp.

C Vladimir Golikov



- A phenomenal offensive player who would be more highly regarded if he wasn't done hockey at age 31. Domestically, he scored 172 goals and roughly 170 assists in 435 Soviet league games. In 1978, he was 2nd in assists and 3rd in points in the Russian league and then put up 36-39 points in each of the next three seasons which wasn’t quite top-10 material but was close. Represented the USSR in 129 games, 59 of which were significant. He had 25 goals and 24 assists in these games. Internationally, he was great, scoring 49 points in 59 big games. His best tournaments were the 1978 WC, when he was 3rd in goals behind Balderis and Mikhailov, 1979, when he was 3rd in assists behind Mikhailov and Petrov, 1981, when he led the team in goals and was 2nd behind Maltsev in points, and 1982, when his 9 points were behind only Makarov, Kapustin, and Larionov.

RW Alexander Golikov



- Another great offensive talent, and even better than his brother. Alex had 225 goals in 385 Russian league games. Finished 7th in the Russian league in scoring in 1977, then 6th in 1978, 4th in 1979, and 8th in 1980. Represented the USSR in 95 games, 43 of which were significant. He had 20 goals and 23 assists in those 43 games. Most significant were the 1979 WC, where his 12 points were behind only Petrov and Kharlamov, and the 1980 Olympics, where he led the team in goals and points. Chidlovski’s site says ” was one of the top scoring forwards of the Russian Elite League of the 1970s…Khimik was a rare Russian team of the 1970s that followed a distinct defensive style. Alexander Golikov managed to develop into a skillful scorer of the Russian League even with a team where scoring was rather secondary to a strict defense… Soviet hockey, Alexander Maltsev... Both Golikov's brothers played for the Team USSR and were inducted into the "Russian Hall of Fame" for their outstanding achievements… In 1974, Golikov was 22. He was selected as a candidate for the Team USSR 1974 at the Summit Series but he didn't play a single game in the Series.”

Second Line

LW Ken Smith


- I found 4 LWs who had remarkably similar careers. All four started their careers between 1942 and 1945. All of them played between 331 and 426 games. All had between 171 and 224 points. All had between .52 and .55 career points per game. All lost at least one Stanley Cup final. All were top-20 in goals twice. For each one, it was quite easy to find quotes supporting their toughness and/or defensive ability. It was tough to choose exactly where to slot them all, but all four will make the 2nd or 3rd team. Ken Smith starts us off, mainly because his playoff production is the best of the bunch. With 21 points in 30 games, it’s a shame he only played in one final series. In the regular season, Smith was a top-20 goalscorer twice, including once in the top-15. He had defensive ability, too – from LOH.net: "Pound for pound, he is one of the best players in the NHL." This is the praise that Dick Irvin gave Kenny Smith as he watched him check his Canadiens star Maurice Richard in the 1945-46 Stanley Cup finals. “Players” notes that Smith was “tough as nails and particularly resilient, once playing in 237 consecutive games.” Amazing that a tough player like Smith only amassed 49 PIMs in 331 NHL games.

C Michal Pivonka


- Robert Lang is probably a better individual talent than Pivonka, having better stats in a tougher era, but Pivonka gets the nod for the second line thanks to his all-around game and how he helped lift Bondra to be the game’s top goalscorer. Pivonka was never top-10 assists but did finish 13th and 16th. He had good size – 6’2”, 200 lbs, and was far from soft. From LOH.net: filled an important void created by the retirement of Bengt Gustafsson. Pivonka centred a line between Bobby Gould and Gatean Duchesne, making a good impression from the start with his strong skating, excellent passing, and willingness to play physically. Pivonka remained as a fixture with the Caps for 12 seasons. By the early nineties, fellow countryman Petr Bondra joined the club, uniting with Pivonka to make an effective offensive duo. In tandem, they raised each other's game”. Had a decent 55 points in 95 playoff teams and was a 1998 Stanley Cup finalist, though by then he was not an impact player.

RW Alexander Martynyuk


- Martynyuk was a very skilled offensive winger who placed in the top-4 in Russian League scoring at a time when making the leaderboard was not an easy task: 3rd in 1970, 4th in 1971, and 2nd in 1973. Only Maltsev, Kharlamov, Petrov, and Mikhailov topped him during these seasons. He finished with 212 goals in 410 league games. Strangely, Martynyuk only played 20 significant international games for the USSR, and I’m assuming it’s because his all-around game wasn’t great. But he had 16 goals and 24 points in the games he got into – in the 1973 WCs, only the Petrov line had more goals or points than him. If you want an offense-only RW, at this point martynyuk is your man.


Last edited by seventieslord: 04-18-2009 at 08:14 PM.
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04-05-2009, 12:23 AM
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The Defensive Corps

D Vladimir Brezhnev




- Brezhnev is the leader in games played and goals scored for team USSR among available players. He had a very respectable 45 goals in 350 league games, and 17 more in 57 international games. He won two WC golds with Russia, and posted the same numbers as Ragulin in the 1966 games. (7-4-2-6). He is in the Russian Hockey Hall of Fame.

D Jack Portland



- Portland was the tallest player in the NHL when he played – 6’2”, 185 lbs. He and Eddie Shore made an imposing pair for a number of years with Boston. According to LOH.net, He was a key performer, providing a solid defensive foundation for the Bruins as they won a Stanley Cup in 1939 According to “Players”, Portland was as talented an athlete as existed in Canada. He competed in the 1932 Olympics in high jump; he was also accomplished at javelin and boxing… Teamed with Eddie Shore on the Bruins, the two formed a fearsome line of defense… his long stride and broad shoulders cut an imposing swath across the ice lanes”. He scored 71 points in 381 NHL games, and though that doesn’t sound like much, he was actually 10th in the NHl among defensemen twice. He also played in 8 playoffs, with 4 points in 33 games. In the one season that we have all-star voting records that go that far down, 1937, Portland is 11th among defensemen.

D Kent Douglas



- Kent Douglas won the Calder Trophy in 1963, and was 11th in Norris voting. That's not much, but it's a great start. however, it was all downhill from there. He clashed with Imlach too often, and found himself up and down for the next few seasons. Though he could never meet the expectations he established in that first season, he managed to forge a decent career with 148 points in 428 games. He is simply the best point-producing defenseman left, with a 3rd place finish, three 9ths, and an 11th-place finish. Though his play was erratic over the years, he was usually good for 20 points, and he could play tough, too. "Heroes" calls him a "solid, intelligent defender". He is on record as being a three-time cup winner, but never played in the playoffs with the Leafs for any of those cups.

D Dana Murzyn



- Steady is the best way to describe Dana Murzyn. He was known for being a slow skater, yet was almost always a plus player. He helped the Calgary Flames to the 1989 Stanley Cup (according to LOH.net, he was a key component on their blueline), and helped the Canucks to the 1994 finals, at least for the first 87 regular season and playoff games until he injured his knee. At 6’2”, 200 lbs, he had good size, and he liked to use it. Murzyn rarely made a mistake and liked to make the safe play with the puck. According to “Canucks Legends”, Murzyn provided strong leadership and a steady hand on the blueline. Joe Pelletier says: …played a hard working, hard hitting, honest game. He did much of the dirty work that make or break teams and that many players wouldn't do themselves… made a pretty good living by clearing creases and blocking NHL shots….Wayne Gretzky, for one, is probably happy to see Murzyn go. The Great One admitted on more than one occasion that he doesn't particularly enjoy playing against Murzyn. Murzyn somehow knew how to get under the skin of Gretzky, and wasn't afraid to rough him up a bit either…

D Paul Cavallini



- Cavallini is all but forgotten today, but he was a great all-around defenseman for 8 full seasons and parts of two others. LOH.net describes him as “ a very reliable defenceman in his own end with fine offensive abilities as well. The numbers support this statement, as he had 233 points in 564 games, topping 35 points four times. He also led the NHL in +/- 1989-90. In that same season he played in the all-star game. “Players” calls him “steady and unspectacular In his relatively short career, he got into 69 playoff games, scoring an impressive 35 points.

D Dan McGillis



- Dan McGillis kind of flew under the radar for a long time, but he had a pretty good career. Available icetime numbers show him to be a #3 defenseman for most of his career, usually on pretty good teams like the Flyers. McGillis led the league in hits one season, and when he got PP time, he proved his worth in the offensive zone by finishing in the top-15 among defensemen in points twice. He had good size – 6’3”, 220 lbs – and liked to use it. He was even 14th in Norris voting in 2001. In many ways he was a poor man’s Robert Svehla – just as physical, a little bigger, but not as good or consistent offensively.


Last edited by seventieslord: 04-18-2009 at 08:18 PM.
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04-05-2009, 12:28 AM
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The Third Line

LW Adam Brown




- “Players” says Adam Brown “made the Red Wings immediately due to his superb skating and unwillingness to back down from rough play”. Brown was top-20 in goals twice, including once in the top-10. He had 217 points and 378 PIM in 391 games over 9 NHL seasons. In 1946 he was 9th in goals and in 1947 he was 6th in assists, showing he could do both effectively. He was top-10 in PIMs twice, won the 1943 cup with Detroit and lost the finals the year before with them. When he was sent down to the AHL after his rookie season, he rebounded by being named to the first All-Star team down there. LOH.net describes him as “reliable goal scorer who could stand his ground in front of the net and win battles for the puck along the boards” and notes that he was “was a solid defensive player for nearly five years in Chicago” – Although his offensive production in the regular season is as good as the other three LWs, it is this defensive ability and his lack of playoff production (6 in 26 games) that makes him a good 3rd liner for this squad.

C Michal Handzus



- Handzus is still in the NHL; you just didn’t realize this because he’s been buried in LA for two seasons now. At 6’5”, 217 lbs, he has enormous size. He can survive on a 2nd line but is best suited to third line duty. He’s been 2nd, 8th, and 11th in Selke voting during his career and has killed a ton of penalties, his long reach serving him well. Handzus has 360 points in 676 NHL games and a decent 25 more in 60 playoff games. He has represented his country four times since turning pro, scoring 14 points in 21 games over 4 tournaments.

RW Ken Schinkel



- Schinkel was property of the Rangers for over a decade, during which time they shuttled him back and forth between the AHL. He provided a decent amount of offense as well as playing strong defense. According to LOH.net, Because of his veteran sensibility, the Rangers used Schinkel as a defensive forward, mostly on checking lines and killing penalties. In “Heroes”, it is said that because he was a more seasoned player who knew the importance of backchecking, Schinkel was often placed with rookies, so they might pick up his defensive style. He said, “I prided myself on my defensive work. I was just hoping the brass would appreciate the defensive part of my game. I got a bigger kick out of making a play than sscoring. Far from a mere defensive specialist, Schinkel put up 325 points in 636 NHL games. Though there is no doubt that expansion helped lengthen his career, when Schinkel finally retired, he was the 4th oldest player in the NHL (40)

The Fourth Line

LW Pete Horeck




- Horeck actually had the most goals and points among the four similar LWs I found, but his style of play makes him a perfect 4th liner. Look at what “Players” says about him: ”The Michael Peca of his day, Pete Horeck packed a ton of meanness and physical punishment into his 145-pound frame… established a reputation as a ferocious checker who was both fearless and reckless… he became a fan favourite, the little guy who could…in the first round of the 1951 playoffs he had his most controversial moment, racing after a loose puck he collided with Al Rollins, who was lost for the series with ligament damage.” Horeck was a top-10 goalscorer once and top-20 one more time. He was also top-10 in assists once. He finished with 224 points in 426 games and a decent 14 more in 34 playoff games. He also posted 340 PIMs, finishing in the top-10 once. “Pistol Pete”, as he was known, went to two finals, 1948 and 1949, but lost both times.

C Steve Rucchin



- A great all-around player who was the center for Paul Kariya and Teemu Selanne for a few seasons. Rucchin was known as being very solid at both ends of the ice. He put up 489 points in 735 games, almost entirely in the dead puck era. He added 17 more in 37 playoff games, including the 2003 Finals run with the Ducks, where he was the team’s leading goal scorer. He had two game winners that year, including the OT goal that completed the sweep of the heavily favoured Red Wings. He finished 7th and 14th in Selke voting during his career, and LOH.net says that he has established himself as a versatile NHLer with sound hockey instincts, good puck control, and a willingness to work his own end and the corners to good effect. He has a great career adjusted +/- rating of +95 thanks to his great work in both ends.

RW Mike Knuble



- Knuble has been a good two-way forward for over a decade now. He had a really late start in the NHL, playing his first full season at age 25, but he won the cup with the 1998 Red Wings. For four more seasons, Knuble played more of a defensive and physical role, usually playing on energy lines, throwing his big 6’3”, 230 lb frame around in the corners. It wasn’t until age 30 that he was given a chance to play top-6 minutes and get powerplay time, and he seized the opportunity, posting at least 21 goals and 46 points for the next six seasons while still being a conscientious and physical player. He has been very durable as he is now completing his sixth full injury-free season, and at 36, shows no signs of slowing down.


Last edited by seventieslord: 04-05-2009 at 01:04 AM.
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04-05-2009, 01:00 AM
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the Goaltenders

G Hec Fowler




- Hec Fowler was a longtime PCHA/WCHL goalie. Made the PCHA 1st All-Star team in 1917 and then the 2nd in 1918. Led the league in wins in 1918 and 1923, and in shutouts in 1918 and 1920. Never got to play for the cup. Finished with a decent 83-100-3 record, with a 3.57 GAA in a career spent mostly in the wide-open PCHA. He came to the NHL in the 1925 season with Boston and bombed hard. But his legacy was well-established by then.

G Roman Cechmanek



- Seriously, Roman Cechmanek. This guy was so good in three regular seasons, that Philadelphia fans thought they had finally found their playoff goaltender. During this time he was an outstanding regular season goaltender - 2nd in GAA all three years, top-4 in sv% each season, won the Jennings once and made the 2nd All-Star Team. Was also 7th in Vezina voting, and 5th and 6th in All-Star voting. Even received enough Hart votes to place 4th one year. Cechmanek is known as a playoff choker, but he only had three chances. In 2001, he was fairly bad as Buffalo upset Philadelphia. In 2002 he was rock solid when the Flyers scored two goals in a five-game 1st round. In 2002-03 he was shaky, yet good enough to beat the Leafs, and held Philly in round 2 before being bombed in the final two games. Prior to coming to the NHL, Cechmanek was a money goalie of the highest order, winning five straight Czech league titles, going 45-20 over six playoffs, with a 1.62 GAA. This tells us there's a possibility that his playoff shortcomings in the NHL are more due to a small sample size than anything else. He was also the Czech league's top regular season goalie five seasons in a row. Cechmanek is also experienced internationally, having played in eight tournaments.

G Alexander Sidelnikov



- A second team Russian League All-Star in 1973, Sidelnikov was usually called upon to be Tretiak's backup in international competitions. He was the backup in the two Summit Series, the 1976 Olympics, a super series, and four World Championships. He has an international record of 14-1 in the games that would be considered major, with a 2.07 GAA, contributing to multiple gold medals in the process. Chidlovski's site says: "Alexander Sidelnikov was one of the top Soviet elite goalies of the 1970s. Like many other Soviet goalies of that time, he was destined to be overshadowed by a sensational career performance of legendary Vladislav Tretiak. On the national team level, Sidelnikov served as Tretiak's back-up from 1972 to 1977...Throughout his career, Sidelnikov was known for his good conditioning, quick reflexes, fast decision making and good anticipation of the opponent's moves. After the '76 Winter Olympics, Sidelnikov was inducted into the Russian Hall of Fame."

The Spares

D/RW Valeri Nikitin



- Nikitin is among the leaders among Russian defensemen in games played for the national team with 43. He played 16 games in important tournaments, scoring 10 points and bringing home a gold both times. Domestically, he played 510 games and scored 134 goals. He was a 3rd team All-Star in 1967. Based on his year by year goal totals, it appears that he switched from forward to defense and back on a few occasions in his career.

C Alexander Kozhevnikov



- Need an offensive ringer? Here's your guy. Kozhevnikov had great size, 6'3", 195 lbs, and was a big-time scorer. With the KLM line as his competition, Kozhevnikov finished 2nd in Russian league scoring in 1982 and 1983, and 5th in 1984 and 1988. He finished with 243 goals and 188 assists in 525 Russian league games. He had 18 points in 24 important international games, and was among Russia's leaders at the 1982 World Championships and the 1984 Olympics. Kozhevnikov was 5th in MVP voting in 1982, one of very few remaining players to achieve this.

The Coach

Marc Crawford



- Not many Stanley Cup coaches are left. Crawford won the 1996 cup with Colorado and led the franchise to division titles in his first four seasons. Crawford ran into much criticism in recent years over his allegiance to a very mediocre goalie, but as his overall coaching career stands, it looks pretty good. He has managed a .555 win% in 987 games, as well as a 43-40 playoff record. He won the 1995 Adams trophy and came 5th in voting two years later. Also led the 1992 Baby Leafs to the AHL final.

And that completes my Second All-Unselected team. Players with a * were mentioned in this thread already:


Archie Briden - Vladimir Golikov - Alexander Golikov
Ken Smith - Michal Pivonka* - Alexander Martynyuk
Adam Brown - Michal Handzus - Ken Schinkel
Pete Horeck - Steve Rucchin - Mike Knuble

Vladimir Brezhnev - Jack Portland
Kent Douglas* - Dana Murzyn
Paul Cavallini - Dan McGillis

Hec Fowler
Roman Cechmanek
Alexander Sidelnikov

Spares:
D/RW Valeri Nitikin
C Alexander Kozhevnikov

Coach:
Marc Crawford

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04-05-2009, 02:37 AM
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Third Team

First Line

LW/C Parker MacDonald



- MacDonald was a journeyman forward who was fortunate enough to play with Delvecchio and Howe for a season – 1962-63, when he finished 5th in goals and just out of the top-10 in points. Two years after that, he made his mark as a playmaker, putting up 33 assists, good for 10th in the league. He never won a cup, but he went to four finals with Detroit – 1961, 1963, 1964, and 1966. He finished with 323 points in 676 games and 28 more in 75 playoff games.


C Guy Charron



- A great scorer but not the greatest all-around player, Charron was very much like Ivan Boldirev, just with a career a few seasons shorter. He was top-10 in goals once and top-15 one more time. He also topped 39 assists four times. He is the holder of the record for most career games without a playoff game. Well, he was, anyway, and he will be again, unless Olli Jokinen suffers a major injury in the next two weeks. Charron played in the 1977 All-Star game and was one of the more skilled players of his time. He finished with 530 points in 734 games. The ineptitude of his teams is shown by his career +/- of –208, but his career adjusted +/- is only –11. LOH.net describes him as reliable and consistent, and says he played a defensive role in his first season with the Wings. He was maligned for never making the playoffs or rising to the occasion, but this is a guy who wasn’t even supposed to play in the NHl because of his size.

RW Jiri Lala



- One of Europe’s top offensive performers during the 1980’s. He played his prime years in the Czech league, finishing 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, 7th, and 9th in scoring there. He really shone internationally – he won a Gold in the 1981 World Championships, plus silver in 1982, 1983, and the 1984 Olympics. He also played in the 1981 Canada Cup. In four of those five tournaments he easily paced his Czech teammates in scoring. In all, he had 38 goals and 62 points in 70 international games. He as a multi-dimensional offensive star, setting them up just as easily as he scored them. From Kings Of the Ice: “My opponents started noticing me more, so I started passing more often so as not to attract attention… It is hard to say what brought me more joy – scoring myself or having made a successful pass to someone else. It was just as nice to hear a word of thanks from a successful scoring player. Besides, it gave me the feeling that I wasn’t just playing hockey for myself.”

Second Line

LW Alex Kaleta




- Kaleta is the fourth of the seemingly identical post-WW2 left wingers – Ken Smith, Alex Brown, and Pete Horeck being the others. Kaleta was twice a top-15 goalscorer and was even 4th in the NHL in assists in1946. He had good size, 6’0”, 175 lbs. He finished with 213 points in 387 games. He had a disappointing playoff record of just 7 points in 17 games but he did get to the finals with the 1950 Rangers. LOH.net says he was a “solid offensive producer” and “Kaleta's role was more defensive in New York” so he has some experience at both ends of the ice. Kaleta missed the three most lucrative war years, 1943-1945.

C Robert Lang



- By now, Lang deserves his due. He is a big, strong center who has put up points for a long time now. He has 252 goals and 674 points in 925 NHL games, and a decent 45 in 87 in the playoffs. Lang was 9th in assists and points in the 2004 season and was actually 4th in All-Star voting among centers that season. After a very modest start to his career, he has posted at least 0.75 PPG in 8 of the last 9 seasons. He has represented the Czechs in 4 Olympics, scoring 23 points in 26 games.

RW Jonathan Cheechoo



- Yep, Cheechoo. Let’s not completely ignore the fact that he led the NHL in goals in 2006 and he wasn’t a complete flash in the pan – he was in the top-15 once too. All you need to do is get him a center, and he’ll score. We’ve picked other wingers who were made by their centers – Ray Sheppard and Glen Murray come to mind – and Cheechoo won’t be too far off their level when his career is over. He has a knack for getting open and a quick shot, and is deadly on the PP.


Last edited by seventieslord: 09-03-2009 at 11:24 AM.
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04-05-2009, 03:23 AM
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The Defensive Corps

D Randy Manery



- The first thing I noticed about Manery was that he was a defenseman from the 1970’s who picked up a lot of points and wasn’t selected yet – that usually means they’re a defensive liability. But I don’t see that in Manery. First, the offensive side: he was twice in the top-15 in scoring by defensemen and scored 256 points in 582 games. He just missed making the top-15 a third time, by one point. The only thing missing from his offensive resume is some playoff numbers – he played just 13 games and had only 2 points. He was far from a liability, though – he finished his career a +11 and was an adjusted +61. “Players” says he was a “consistent and reliable defenseman who could move the puck well and lead by example”. LOH.net says: ” he established himself as one of his team's most consistent defenders. Although not a hitter, he earned his marks as a cool customer who could skate well, move the puck with ease, shoot well from the point, and perform effectively under pressure… During his first two seasons on the West Coast, he was consistently his team's best all-around defender. He was usually teamed with resident brawler Dave Hutchison who was known to spiral out of control. Manery brought a steadying influence that helped keep the duo more focused.“ An iron deficiency actually had a part in Manery’s career ending at age 31.
D Jean Potvin



- Potvin had a decent career that was highlighted by his excellent 1975-76 season in which he scored 72 points, second among defensemen, and was 10th in Norris voting. Potvin, a puck rushing defenseman, was no small part of the Islanders rise from also-rans to contenders, but you have to trade something to get something, and he was dealt for Wayne Merrick before the team became a dynasty. Potvin was never the same. They actually traded to get him back before winning a cup, but by then he was just a #7 defenseman and did not play a playoff game in 1980 or 1981, his last two seasons. He is officially credited with two cup wins, though. In all, he scored 287 points in 613 games and 11 in 39 playoff games. He was top-15 in defenseman scoring twice.

D Dmitri Mironov



- A massive Russian defenseman, Mironov quietly put together a long and solid career. He’s 6’4, 224, and threw the occasional big hit, though not as many as his brother did. It’s debatable which of the two was a better overall player. Dmitri started his career in Russia. In the two years before his move to North America, he was 1st and 2nd in scoring among defenseman. He instantly paid dividends for the Leafs, playing excellent hockey in their two semifinal runs. He was 4th in the 1994 playoffs in scoring by defensemen, and 3rd in the 1997 playoffs with Anaheim. He won a cup in 1998 with Detroit. He was always there to represent his country, playing in 5 tournaments and 36 games, scoring 15 points. Mironov played in the 1998 All-Star game and was top-15 in scoring by defensemen once, missing out another time by three points. He won an Olympic silver in 1998. He had 260 points in 556 NHL games.

D Boris Mironov



- Seven years younger than Dmitri, he was no smaller – 6’3 and 223 lbs. Mironov was known for throwing the occasional huge open ice hit. Dave Gagner was the recipient of one of them, and he was never the same afterwards. For a short time, Mironov was the total package and was considered a top-15 defenseman in the NHL. He didn’t hold that status for long, but was a good player for a long time. Icetime numbers show that he was his team’s #1-3 defenseman from 2000 until he left the NHL in 2004. He has been a top-15 scorer among defensemen twice, and scored 307 points in 716 games. “Players” describes him as a “tremendous defenseman, strong on the man, skilled with the puck, and aggressive at both ends of the ice.” He also earned a silver medal in the 1998 Olympics and played in Salt Lake City as well.

D John McKinnon


- McKinnon is but a footnote in history by now, but he was one of the best offensive defensemen of his time, even if his time was really short. He finished 6th and 7th in the NHL in points by a defenseman in his two best seasons with the Pirates, and was particularly good at scoring goals. During his 5-year career from 1926-1931, only 6 defensemen had more goals. LOH.net says: ” a useful goal scorer from the point who played over 200 games in the 1920s and '30s. He could also make quick passes and play the body in his own zone…the Pirates were struggling on and off the ice. One of the lone bright spots in 1929-30 was McKinnon's ten goals and overall hustle.” Only getting into two playoff games in his career is a big part of why he was not selected.

D Robert Picard



- Picard had a very impressive 432 points in 899 career NHL games. He was often unfairly maligned in his stops around the league as he was expected to be Washington’s saviour, then Montreal’s hometown hero. He sure wasn’t a bad player, though – he was top-10 among defensemen in scoring twice and though his career +/- is –45, it is a symptom of the bad teams he played on. He’s an adjusted +20. “Players” says it best – ”He was offensively gifted, but rarely played on a quality team.” When he did get into the playoffs, he was pretty good, putting in 20 points in 36 games.


Last edited by seventieslord: 04-18-2009 at 08:23 PM.
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