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Heel Curve vs Toe Curve

View Poll Results: Do you prefer a Heel or a Toe curve?
Heel 24 53.33%
Toe 21 46.67%
Voters: 45. You may not vote on this poll

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Old
03-30-2009, 07:01 PM
  #26
IniNew
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackjack View Post
The sticks aren't made for specific players, they have the same blade patterns as retail sticks, and they are are much heavier (i.e. more durable) than retail sticks.

They're made for all college and professional leagues. I think they normally cost about the same as a retail stick.

But if you can get them from a reputable source, I would definitely recommend buying them over retail sticks. My sticks never break within a month anyway.
I do believe some of them are made for specific players, represented by their name and number being printed on the name plate section of the stick. And those sticks normally have a unique curve that said player designed for themselves.

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Old
03-30-2009, 09:10 PM
  #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackjack View Post
The sticks aren't made for specific players, they have the same blade patterns as retail sticks, and they are are much heavier (i.e. more durable) than retail sticks.

They're made for all college and professional leagues. I think they normally cost about the same as a retail stick.

But if you can get them from a reputable source, I would definitely recommend buying them over retail sticks. My sticks never break within a month anyway.
Well, it depends on the stick. Stuff made for college and minor pro will have a stock curve, but the selection is much greater then retail curves. You can recognize those by the pattern. They'll have a code instead of a name, say SK-11 (a random RBK prostock curve similar to the Sakic). They can also order them in a wider variety of flexes.

Once you get to the NHL you get a lot of different things going on. Endorsement deals can result in a stick being a completely different model then it's painted, a lot of the pro stock s17s are Synergies for example. And sometimes the synergies are Synergy STs, or in St Louis' case, have a different color. At the NHL level everyone gets a custom curve, but they're often based on a retail curve the player learned on with minor tweaks, but sometimes they can be something completely out there.

Flex is also custom to the player. You also don't get any info on it when buying though, so be careful there.

And they don't make the stick heavier and more durable unless specially asked to. And that doesn't really happen often at all.

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03-30-2009, 09:16 PM
  #28
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It's a personal thing, but all I'm going to say is a lot of what people say to knock the toe curve isn't true. You can still make backhand shots and saucer passes, it just takes a little bit more concentration. I personally take the trade-off of a better wrist shot and give up a little bit of control on passing. It really comes down to where on the ice you shoot from. If you're from the slot and out, I'd recommend the heel. Anything closer or if you're a dangler, go toe.

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03-30-2009, 10:27 PM
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
Well, it depends on the stick. Stuff made for college and minor pro will have a stock curve, but the selection is much greater then retail curves. You can recognize those by the pattern. They'll have a code instead of a name, say SK-11 (a random RBK prostock curve similar to the Sakic). They can also order them in a wider variety of flexes.

Once you get to the NHL you get a lot of different things going on. Endorsement deals can result in a stick being a completely different model then it's painted, a lot of the pro stock s17s are Synergies for example. And sometimes the synergies are Synergy STs, or in St Louis' case, have a different color. At the NHL level everyone gets a custom curve, but they're often based on a retail curve the player learned on with minor tweaks, but sometimes they can be something completely out there.

Flex is also custom to the player. You also don't get any info on it when buying though, so be careful there.

And they don't make the stick heavier and more durable unless specially asked to. And that doesn't really happen often at all.
Fair enough. I should have said 'the pro stock sticks that I've seen'. I saw a batch of pro stock Synergies in a hockey shop once and they were definitely heavier. I agree that NHL players generally have custom stuff, but I would imagine that most of the pro stock that you see in shops and online was not made for them.

If the pro stock stuff is not heavier, why do the (non NHL) pros buy them? Price? That's the only reason I can think of.

As for flex, it looks like you can select a range of specific flexes on the pro stock OPSs at Hockeymonkey...

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Old
03-30-2009, 10:39 PM
  #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
Well, it depends on the stick. Stuff made for college and minor pro will have a stock curve, but the selection is much greater then retail curves. You can recognize those by the pattern. They'll have a code instead of a name, say SK-11 (a random RBK prostock curve similar to the Sakic). They can also order them in a wider variety of flexes.

Once you get to the NHL you get a lot of different things going on. Endorsement deals can result in a stick being a completely different model then it's painted, a lot of the pro stock s17s are Synergies for example. And sometimes the synergies are Synergy STs, or in St Louis' case, have a different color. At the NHL level everyone gets a custom curve, but they're often based on a retail curve the player learned on with minor tweaks, but sometimes they can be something completely out there.

Flex is also custom to the player. You also don't get any info on it when buying though, so be careful there.

And they don't make the stick heavier and more durable unless specially asked to. And that doesn't really happen often at all.
How did you know the sk-11 is like a sakic? Is there a list of comparisons somewhere? The hockey shop by me doesnt sell prostock so Im buying them online without seeing em.

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Old
03-30-2009, 10:44 PM
  #31
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SK-11 is very Sakic, I've had two and they were clones basically. I personally like the heel curve and find it helps on my one timers, not sure if that's common or not.

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Old
03-30-2009, 10:45 PM
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrTurkelton View Post
How did you know the sk-11 is like a sakic? Is there a list of comparisons somewhere? The hockey shop by me doesnt sell prostock so Im buying them online without seeing em.
Monkey has a chart: http://www.hockeymonkey.com/rbk-pro-stock-patterns.html

Quote:
Fair enough. I should have said 'the pro stock sticks that I've seen'. I saw a batch of pro stock Synergies in a hockey shop once and they were definitely heavier. I agree that NHL players generally have custom stuff, but I would imagine that most of the pro stock that you see in shops and online was not made for them.

If the pro stock stuff is not heavier, why do the (non NHL) pros buy them? Price? That's the only reason I can think of.

As for flex, it looks like you can select a range of specific flexes on the pro stock OPSs at Hockeymonkey...
Yeah, but if it's not listed and you're buying at a store, flex is often not marked.

And part of the draw of a stick is the light weight. It makes your stickhandling faster and wears you down slower. You want them light, the fact that composite sticks are lighter is a very big reason that wood is virtually completely out of use on a pro level. Non NHL pros buy them for the much greater curve selection, and depending on the company, they're made to higher quality standards and meet higher testing standards. There are also other custom options available to them that you can't get at retail such as grip options, or have them manufacture the stick a specific way, say if you want grip on one side of the stick and not the other, or a longer stick for taller guys...

Basically the retail versions are pretty much the same stick made en masse in a limited selection of curves for normal people to buy, and have a higher price because they add on a warranty.


Last edited by cptjeff: 03-30-2009 at 10:57 PM.
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Old
03-31-2009, 02:11 AM
  #33
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TPS uses Pro Stock as a kinda brand. EVERY stick i have ever bought (in the last few years) have had Pro Stock on them. From the R4's to the R10's (never used or picked up a R1 so i dont know). Even my wood Aircraftcores have Pro Stock on them. For TPS it doesnt really mean anything, just a kind of branding i guess.

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Old
03-31-2009, 02:12 AM
  #34
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There is a Pro and Con to both blade choices. Neither one is "better" then the other. One may be for your specific game, but in general neither is "better".

Im personally talking out my ass because i have used neither, i like a mid.

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