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how do I get started playing?

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Old
04-13-2009, 02:16 PM
  #1
Jake5
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how do I get started playing?

I've never played any kind of hockey before, other than some casual games with friends in elementary school on a frozen pond. I'm 19 yrs old now and haven't skated since around 6th grade. I stopped following hockey for a while, but got back into it at the start of the 07-08 season and now I'm quite interested in playing (just for fun, of course). where do i get started?

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04-13-2009, 02:20 PM
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Gunnar Stahl 30
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do you have equipment? im assuming not

i would first start skating, buy a cheap pair of skate or borrow someones skates and just go to open skate. if you still want to, get some equipment and go to an open hockey.

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04-13-2009, 05:07 PM
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Dr Turk
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Buy a stick and a helmet and go to a couple sticknpucks. Then if you like it commit and buy the equipment and sign up for a learn to play league. Thatís how I got started.

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04-13-2009, 06:23 PM
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The Big Giant Head
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Buy equipment.

Depending on your financial situation this might take a little while but that's the first thing you need to do. While your getting your gear together i'd go to some kind of public skate at your nearest arena and get the fundamentals of skating down and that means, skating forwards AND backwards with comfort and learning to stop forwards AND backwards. The biggest issue with new players is they dont take the time to learn to skate, they think they can just join a league and learn as they go..big mistake.

When your playing in a league it actually slows you down because 1) you have to share rink time with other players and 2) your forced to focus on playing hockey rather than just skating. Skating is key, you'll learn stick handling and puck control when you play but taking time to learn to skate before you play is really a big deal. I can tell you i've seen tons of guys in several leagues not knowing how to skate very well and seen those same guys months and even years later with little to no improvement. I cant stress enough how key it is to get the fundamentals of skating down before you play in a league.

Good luck...

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04-13-2009, 07:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake5 View Post
I've never played any kind of hockey before, other than some casual games with friends in elementary school on a frozen pond. I'm 19 yrs old now and haven't skated since around 6th grade. I stopped following hockey for a while, but got back into it at the start of the 07-08 season and now I'm quite interested in playing (just for fun, of course). where do i get started?
I coach adult beginners... the ones that get better, faster tend to have friends that start with them. Everyone is going to tell you to go to open skates, go to beginner pickups and maybe take a clinic or two... but having a friend take the venture with you will help you push yourself and you'll have fun the whole time through.

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04-14-2009, 12:07 AM
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i thought it was common sense that people invest themself with more intensity when there with a friend or a relative.

And tblfan

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04-14-2009, 10:12 AM
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TBLfan
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It is common sense but common sense is getting harder and harder to come by... and I see a lot of guys start playing by themselves and just find new friends through hockey. Which works but the guys and girls that come in with friends, have more fun, make more friends and get better, faster... typically.

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04-14-2009, 07:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TBLfan View Post
It is common sense but common sense is getting harder and harder to come by... and I see a lot of guys start playing by themselves and just find new friends through hockey. Which works but the guys and girls that come in with friends, have more fun, make more friends and get better, faster... typically.
It was true for me. If my best friend hadn't gotten me started, I probably never would have tried ice hockey (as opposed to roller), and I wouldn't be as dedicated to improvement as I am today.

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04-14-2009, 09:30 PM
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Jake5
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I've looked at a few sticks, and I'm pretty confused. All the different flexes and options...

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04-14-2009, 09:35 PM
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Gunnar Stahl 30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake5 View Post
I've looked at a few sticks, and I'm pretty confused. All the different flexes and options...
there are one piece sticks, or two piece sticks(shaft and blade)

the flex deals with the shaft. most people go by eastons numbers

85-most flex

100-normal flex

110-stiff flex

the blade can be kind of confusing. there are a bunch of different patterns. i would just look at the pictures and look at the chart and match it up. this way you actualluy can see what the differences are instead of one of us explaing it. unless you have a particular question

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04-14-2009, 09:41 PM
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Little Nilan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake5 View Post
I've looked at a few sticks, and I'm pretty confused. All the different flexes and options...
It's your first stick, go with the one you like the most. I don't think you'll care about flex at this point.

As for your question, have you found begginer leagues? If you're from Montreal there are a few.

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Old
04-14-2009, 10:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kareem View Post
It's your first stick, go with the one you like the most. I don't think you'll care about flex at this point.

As for your question, have you found begginer leagues? If you're from Montreal there are a few.
I was told to find a good wooden stick to start out, and that it would take a while before you could move up to the composites. I'd do that if I were you. Now, if only I could find somewhere in the Milwaukee area that not only had skating lessons, but also a beginner's league that I could jump right in to...

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Old
04-14-2009, 11:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake5 View Post
I've never played any kind of hockey before, other than some casual games with friends in elementary school on a frozen pond. I'm 19 yrs old now and haven't skated since around 6th grade. I stopped following hockey for a while, but got back into it at the start of the 07-08 season and now I'm quite interested in playing (just for fun, of course). where do i get started?
I would recommend playing outdoors on ice when possible season permitting as well as public skating. You do not necessarily have to use a stick when learning the basics of skating.

Others in this thread have given great advice.

Also I HIGHLY recommend shinny hockey (stick and puck in some places) as a way to play pickup games with whomever shows up for it where it is basically paying to play for a couple of hours at your own pace. I pay $8 to play for 2 hours and do so year round once a week and I also play for my men's league team.

In the winter time I play a good 4 or 5 nights a week outdoors and indoors. I load up a regulation sized goal cage in the pickup truck and have at it at outdoor rinks.

Some guys at shinny are basic not very good players and you will find that most guys will take into consideration and give you pointers if you ask. Some are highly skilled players who love the cheap ice time.

As stated by some here I would not recommend playing in a men's league yet UNLESS you can find a beginner's league or something.

Public skatong though does a few things, breaks in your skates, breaks in your feet to get used to wearing skates. I have often heard people complain about arch foot pain etc because they skate once every 6 months.

Once your feet get used to the skate you will enjoy it more.

There really is no wrong way to start playing honestly. i started out on a local outdoor rink when I was 4 years old and am now 40 soon to be 41 and still playing a lot.

You have a good long time to learn and have fun but don't expect too much for the first couple of years. It isn't easy playing ice hockey. The important thing is to have fun and wear the proper protection for yourself.

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Old
04-14-2009, 11:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
I would recommend playing outdoors on ice when possible season permitting as well as public skating. You do not necessarily have to use a stick when learning the basics of skating.

Others in this thread have given great advice.

Also I HIGHLY recommend shinny hockey (stick and puck in some places) as a way to play pickup games with whomever shows up for it where it is basically paying to play for a couple of hours at your own pace. I pay $8 to play for 2 hours and do so year round once a week and I also play for my men's league team.

In the winter time I play a good 4 or 5 nights a week outdoors and indoors. I load up a regulation sized goal cage in the pickup truck and have at it at outdoor rinks.

Some guys at shinny are basic not very good players and you will find that most guys will take into consideration and give you pointers if you ask. Some are highly skilled players who love the cheap ice time.

As stated by some here I would not recommend playing in a men's league yet UNLESS you can find a beginner's league or something.

Public skatong though does a few things, breaks in your skates, breaks in your feet to get used to wearing skates. I have often heard people complain about arch foot pain etc because they skate once every 6 months.

Once your feet get used to the skate you will enjoy it more.

There really is no wrong way to start playing honestly. i started out on a local outdoor rink when I was 4 years old and am now 40 soon to be 41 and still playing a lot.

You have a good long time to learn and have fun but don't expect too much for the first couple of years. It isn't easy playing ice hockey. The important thing is to have fun and wear the proper protection for yourself.
You should not have skate pain if you have a properly fitting skate. And stick and pucks are not pickup, they are sessions where you go out and practice. The rink people throw a bunch of nets out on the ice, and dump out a bucket of pucks. Great time to practice your shots and such with real goalies who come out instead of just shooting in you garage.

Pickup is good, but if you can find a beginner's league is good too. Pickup will help you a lot with skills, but it will teach you nothing about proper positioning and how to play as a team.

And if you can, an adult beginner's class is a must.

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Old
04-15-2009, 12:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
You should not have skate pain if you have a properly fitting skate. And stick and pucks are not pickup, they are sessions where you go out and practice. The rink people throw a bunch of nets out on the ice, and dump out a bucket of pucks. Great time to practice your shots and such with real goalies who come out instead of just shooting in you garage.

Pickup is good, but if you can find a beginner's league is good too. Pickup will help you a lot with skills, but it will teach you nothing about proper positioning and how to play as a team.

And if you can, an adult beginner's class is a must.
Well here (in Maine) it is called Shinny hockey and at another rink stick n' puck which is also shinny hockey with a different name.

i've never heard of stick n' puck as you've described it where I play in Maine. That's cool though .... practice is practice I reckon ;p

Also I don't think the guy is too concerned about proper positioning and how to play as a team. I think he can wait until he can skate good enough and has learned the basics like doing anything that resembles hockey first.

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04-16-2009, 02:57 PM
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I'd also recommend a skating lesson or two, particularly if you don't do any beginner hockey clinics. A good teacher will point out bad habits for you to correct right away. It makes a difference and certainly isn't a bad thing to get an objective opinion of your skating. It's a very good bang for the buck IMO; $30 a half hour is typcial in the Boston area.

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04-16-2009, 04:44 PM
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so I've been going around, looking at sticks...I like the Easton SC2 (w/ Forsberg curve)

however i looked for some reviews online, and a few people said it would break easily. this kind of scared me away, but i'm guessing that since i'm a beginner I probably won't be doing anything strenuous enough to break it...

opinions? should I invest in a more expensive stick or is a cheaper (it's around $60-70) stick ok for a beginner?

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04-16-2009, 04:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake5 View Post
so I've been going around, looking at sticks...I like the Easton SC2 (w/ Forsberg curve)

however i looked for some reviews online, and a few people said it would break easily. this kind of scared me away, but i'm guessing that since i'm a beginner I probably won't be doing anything strenuous enough to break it...

opinions? should I invest in a more expensive stick or is a cheaper (it's around $60-70) stick ok for a beginner?
thats not a bad price. you probably wont break it too easily with a shot since you are just starting out

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04-16-2009, 04:53 PM
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The Big Giant Head
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ehh if u got the money go for it.you probably wont take full advantage of the stick but composites are really strong sticks so it'll last you quiet some time im sure.

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04-16-2009, 04:56 PM
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Gunnar Stahl 30
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you really wont benefit from a top end stick. once you get better and figure things out then maybe get a good one. the lower end sticks tend to be more durable anyway cause they are heavier

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04-16-2009, 05:02 PM
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I'd say just buy a wooden stick. They're cheap and durable. And then it's not as expensive to experiment with different lies/curves/flexes to find what you like best.

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04-16-2009, 06:00 PM
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yeah, i went back to the store after class and i ended up picking up a cheap $10 wooden RBK stick just to mess around with until I get the hang of things.

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04-16-2009, 09:16 PM
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yeah, i went back to the store after class and i ended up picking up a cheap $10 wooden RBK stick just to mess around with until I get the hang of things.
Cool beans .... you can't go wrong with that honestly. Have fun playing the greatest game in the world.

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04-17-2009, 02:07 PM
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If you're set on buying composite, look around for the Nike Bauer Vapor XVI. It's a very good stick at a reasonable price. It's cheap because it's an older model, but I love mine.

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04-17-2009, 02:13 PM
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Tonight is my first learn to skate to play hockey class. I have been doing pretty good in my regular learn to skate class. Hopefully I don't screw up.

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