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Cant make a tight turn?

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Old
04-20-2009, 07:04 PM
  #1
Dr Turk
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Cant make a tight turn?

I cant ever seem to do a proper tight turn. What I mean by this is, when people make a tight turn to the right, they have their right foot in front and sort of lean into the turn. Their skates are almost directly in front of the other. Whenever I turn I seem to push off my outer foot and point my other foot in the direction of the turn, with my feet far apart. Any suggestions on how to do a proper tight turn? Iím thinking it has something to do with me not using my edges properly.

Thanks for the help.

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04-20-2009, 07:20 PM
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Gunnar Stahl 30
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yea. put your lead foot in front like you said. you have to just do it. if you are making a tight turn to the right put your right foot in front and stagger your left. put your weight more on your heels and use your OUTSIDE edge for your front foot and INSIDE for your back. you have to lean your body too, really put your weight into it. keep your knees bent and your back straight. remember to keep your weight more on your heels, other wise you might fall forward coming out of the turn. you have to commit to it. its not going to feel comfortable until you get used to it.

my biggest advice is keep practicing it until you have it down. dont get comfortable doing it an inefficient way. it will come back to bite you during a game and it is harder to correct when you are already comfortable doing it the wrong way

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04-20-2009, 09:52 PM
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The thing I see most with people who can't turn tight is they don't use their shoulders. You can't turn your hips without turning your shoulders. My suggestion is when turning on your forehand side that you set your stick blade on the ice and turn around your stick. Try using the faceoff dots to practice this. Skate up to the face off dot, inside skate in front of the outside skate. Skates closer than shoulder width apart. Set your stick inside the faceoff dot and don't let it slide out. This will turn your shoulders and hips and then turn hard on your edges and make one crossover as you finish the turn and get straight in the opposite direction.
When going the other way follow your stick through the turn. Point your stick in the direction you are going to turn. Cross your hands over so your bottom hand is leading and the back of your hand is facing the ceiling. Top hand elbow in tight to your body and knuckles toward the ceiling. If you just stand still with your feet together on the ice and do this with your stick and hands you will notice that your whole body will turn. This again will turn your shoulders and hips and then follow your stick around and make one crossover to finish the turn. Keep your weight about 60/40 on your outside edge of your inside foot. Hope this all makes sense. Good luck!!!

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04-20-2009, 10:13 PM
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Try doing your tight turns with a puck. Keep your hands close together near the top of the stick and try to lead with the puck. You'll find that as you turn your hips, your shoulders will rotate as you try to handle the puck.

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04-20-2009, 10:29 PM
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TheShoe82
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Could also consider getting your skates radiused (sp?). A neutral radius like that of a centerman would help in making quicker turns.

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04-20-2009, 11:40 PM
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Hockeyfan68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShoe82 View Post
Could also consider getting your skates radiused (sp?). A neutral radius like that of a centerman would help in making quicker turns.
yes this is important ... i have a custom radius for my height and weight which is 235lbs. people do not realize that when you are big or small you should have a custom radius for your build.

I also have a custom rocker point in my blade that suits my style which is to turn tightly once in a while but I play more a rush the net style and do not make quick cuts and tight turns as often. A defenseman will have one customized where the contact point is closer to his toes as he skates backwards most of the time, some forwards have it in the middle and some off the middle towards the rear so they sit more on their ball of their feet.

Everyone skates differently so one skate blade shape does not fit everyone. it would be like saying one stickblade curve should be used by everyone.

I do not know what my skate has other than the guy who does them saying the radius is custom and the hollow is in between 1/2" and 5/8" and he copied a skate I brought him for the contact rocker point.

I also have a not very deep hollow and again I do not know what he sets his wheel for for me exactly but I like a shallow hollow for more speed and enough for tighter turns. If one wants to grab into the ice in tight turns more they will have a deeper hollow. The hollow is the depth running down the lenmgbth of the blade.

Also you may consider that whomever is doing your skates sucks at it. It happens ... sometimes they get the hollow off center so turning one way works fine and the other is off balance.

The guy that does my skates does the skates for QMJHL MAINEiacs team in my hometown and I will never let anyone else touch my skates except him now. They are PERFECT.

Finding someone who knows what they are doing for a custom radius isn't easy in the United States though some places have a computerized thingie they claim does a good job. Good luck if this may be something that helps you out.

The above mentioned face off dot exercise is extremely good too ... I do legovers endlessly in tight circles with my stick in the middle of a dot until I am dizzy. Good practice on outdoor ice when nobody is there to play a pickup game.


Last edited by Hockeyfan68: 04-20-2009 at 11:45 PM.
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Old
04-21-2009, 12:06 AM
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
yes this is important ... i have a custom radius for my height and weight which is 235lbs. people do not realize that when you are big or small you should have a custom radius for your build.

I also have a custom rocker point in my blade that suits my style which is to turn tightly once in a while but I play more a rush the net style and do not make quick cuts and tight turns as often. A defenseman will have one customized where the contact point is closer to his toes as he skates backwards most of the time, some forwards have it in the middle and some off the middle towards the rear so they sit more on their ball of their feet.

Everyone skates differently so one skate blade shape does not fit everyone. it would be like saying one stickblade curve should be used by everyone.

I do not know what my skate has other than the guy who does them saying the radius is custom and the hollow is in between 1/2" and 5/8" and he copied a skate I brought him for the contact rocker point.

I also have a not very deep hollow and again I do not know what he sets his wheel for for me exactly but I like a shallow hollow for more speed and enough for tighter turns. If one wants to grab into the ice in tight turns more they will have a deeper hollow. The hollow is the depth running down the lenmgbth of the blade.

Also you may consider that whomever is doing your skates sucks at it. It happens ... sometimes they get the hollow off center so turning one way works fine and the other is off balance.

The guy that does my skates does the skates for QMJHL MAINEiacs team in my hometown and I will never let anyone else touch my skates except him now. They are PERFECT.

Finding someone who knows what they are doing for a custom radius isn't easy in the United States though some places have a computerized thingie they claim does a good job. Good luck if this may be something that helps you out.

The above mentioned face off dot exercise is extremely good too ... I do legovers endlessly in tight circles with my stick in the middle of a dot until I am dizzy. Good practice on outdoor ice when nobody is there to play a pickup game.
A defensive profile would just back of neutral, for skating backward.
A forward (this includes centermen)would have his skates cut forward of neutral for more speed and explosive take offs and for turning sharper.

As for the sharp, I like the 5/8 sharp and I play D most of the time but I like my skates cut forward just slightly 25/50. I am thinking about moving the profile forward just a little bit.

here is a good explanation of profiles and sharps.
http://www.weatherimagery.com/blog/h...kate-countour/

You are just going to have to force yourself to trust your blades will hold the ice in turns and do it over and over again until you are comfortable in a leaning position in a turn.
your skates will only help so much. I spend 20 min turning forward and backwards every time I skate, when ever I skate public skate or stick and puck. I'm not the greatest skater in the world but a few friends have been surprised at how much better my skating is than just a few months ago and it's just from practice. running the same drills over and over.

When you are at stick and puck practice turning sharp with your stick on the ice and use it to lean on as you cut to your shooting side.

good luck.

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Old
04-21-2009, 01:00 AM
  #8
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Thanks for the help guys. Really each post has been helpful, you guys are great.

Like some of you have said, I try to turn my shoulder into the turn, to lean into the turn like your supposed to, but when I turn my shoulders I want to turn my hips, brining the opposite foot in front.

So for example if Im turning to the right, I always want to bring my left foot in front. Its kind of like when you do a crossover to the right and your right foot sort of fall falls out from under you to your left. Thatís what seems natural to me and having your right foot in front just feels so unnatural to me. I think my biggest problem is Ive never been comfortable leaning to one side, I donít trust my edges.

As for the radius thing, is this something they do at normal chain hockey shops? I play on Easton SE10ís and they do have kind of a flat blade, so maybe thatís the problem? Is changing it out expensive?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steelhead16 View Post
The thing I see most with people who can't turn tight is they don't use their shoulders. You can't turn your hips without turning your shoulders. My suggestion is when turning on your forehand side that you set your stick blade on the ice and turn around your stick. Try using the faceoff dots to practice this. Skate up to the face off dot, inside skate in front of the outside skate. Skates closer than shoulder width apart. Set your stick inside the faceoff dot and don't let it slide out. This will turn your shoulders and hips and then turn hard on your edges and make one crossover as you finish the turn and get straight in the opposite direction.
When going the other way follow your stick through the turn. Point your stick in the direction you are going to turn. Cross your hands over so your bottom hand is leading and the back of your hand is facing the ceiling. Top hand elbow in tight to your body and knuckles toward the ceiling. If you just stand still with your feet together on the ice and do this with your stick and hands you will notice that your whole body will turn. This again will turn your shoulders and hips and then follow your stick around and make one crossover to finish the turn. Keep your weight about 60/40 on your outside edge of your inside foot. Hope this all makes sense. Good luck!!!
Thanks for the tip, I cant wait to try it out. Though Im not really getting the bolded part, is it a completely different grip, how are both your knuckles up?

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04-21-2009, 11:37 AM
  #9
Steelhead16
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It's simple, I probably made it seem harder than it is. If you just stand still and straight up with your blade about knee high. (I don't know if you are left or right handed) Keep your grip the same. Bottom hand about mid shaft and then point your blade to the opposite side of where you stand normally (to your backhand side). Your hands will naturally cross over each other. The backhand side of your blade will point up as will your knuckles on your bottom hand. Also keep the top hand in at your waist and it will naturally turn over on it's own as well. Better?

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04-21-2009, 12:31 PM
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When you attempt to make a tighter turn, do you feel like your blades chatter?

I'm almost positive it is a posture issue.

Case in point - this skater was having issues making turns. Note the tendon guard in relation to her legs. She was firmly planted on her inside edges.



I adjusted her to this -


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04-21-2009, 04:20 PM
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ModSquad View Post
When you attempt to make a tighter turn, do you feel like your blades chatter?

I'm almost positive it is a posture issue.

Case in point - this skater was having issues making turns. Note the tendon guard in relation to her legs. She was firmly planted on her inside edges.

[img]

I adjusted her to this -

[IMG]
What exactly did you do to achieve this result? Did you angle the holders inward?

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Old
04-21-2009, 05:37 PM
  #12
Gunnar Stahl 30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IniNew View Post
What exactly did you do to achieve this result? Did you angle the holders inward?
i could be wrong but this is what i noticed.

when people are first starting out they always have their weight on the inside of their blades and kind of bend their ankles in. that is not a good stance because they wont be able to use their outside edge.

if you notice her left foot still isnt completely fixed but its overall much better

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Old
04-21-2009, 10:08 PM
  #13
adaminnj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar Stahl 30 View Post
i could be wrong but this is what i noticed.

when people are first starting out they always have their weight on the inside of their blades and kind of bend their ankles in. that is not a good stance because they wont be able to use their outside edge.

if you notice her left foot still isnt completely fixed but its overall much better
the top picture is called ankle skating. the bottom pic has her in a forward stance and concentrating on her foot position.
I think her knees still need to bend a bit more forward but it is a great improvement from the first pic.

Good call by ModSquad to consider stance!

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Old
04-22-2009, 11:40 AM
  #14
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Keep your weight on your OUTER foot during the turn (that is opposite to what you do while attempt to cross over).

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04-22-2009, 09:06 PM
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She pronates - this was all done to correct posture. I added material between the holder and boot to compensate for her bad posture.

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