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Everything you need (and more than you'd want) to know about sticks

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Old
04-27-2009, 01:55 AM
  #1
TheSkatingDutchman
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Everything you need (and more than you'd want) to know about sticks

I've worked in a pro for the past few years and day after day I see people buying the wrong sticks because they really don't know much about them. Even some people I work with don't know a whole lot about sticks. So here's the basic gist of it.

Flex
This is the most commonly misunderstood part of a stick. Flex is the amount of force you need to put on the stick for it to bend. Each composite (who uses wooden sticks anymore) stick has a flex number. This number ranges from the 80s to the low 100s. As a rule of thumb, the flex should be about half of your weight. For instance, I'm 175 and use an 87 flex.

IF YOU CUT THE STICK DOWN YOU WILL MAKE IT HARDER TO FLEX

This is a very important factor in buying a new stick, especially for a child or middle schooler. If your son is under 160 pounds then a composite stick will not help them at all. I've actually seen a bantam sit on a stick to make it bend and his parents bought it. Please, buy an age appropriate stick. Which brings me to my next point.

Length and Size
The butt of the stick should come up to your nose when your skates are off and your chin when you have your skates on. If you mess up the length you'll notice problems with stick handling and with slapshots.

Sticks also come in three different sizes Junior, Intermediate and Senior. These stick sizes correspond to the age of the person using them. The most misunderstood switch is from Intermediate to Senior. Parents will buy their son a $200 Senior stick and have it cut down for them. Please, buy a cheap stick until they get taller and add a bit of weight, hockey equipment is expensive as is so don't waste money.

Curve
The curve is the term used to describe the way the blade of the stick is bent. A curve can start in the heel (where the blade connects to the shaft), the middle or mid and the toe (the end of the blade). Every curve has a different depth, from slight to deep. The most important factor in a curve is the lie, which is the angle of the blade to the shaft. A lie is the best way to remember what kind of curve you prefer and is categorized from 1 to 7. A 1 curve is straight and a 7 is a near ridiculous angle. Most every stick made is from Lie 4 to 7.

This is all a matter of preference though and you will probably need to try different curves out before you find one that fits you well. Generally speaking, the higher the lie the easier it is to lift the puck off the ice. A deep curve does have setbacks though as it will hurt your backhand and make receiving passes more difficult.

THE MOST IMPORTANT THING TO KNOW ABOUT STICKS
Your stick needs to be relative to your, or your child's, skill level. A $200 stick is not going to turn a beginner into Ovechkin and no curve or flex will teach you the proper slapshot technique. Remember that you are taking the shot, not the stick.

And remember: there is a difference between top of the line composite sticks and discount ones from a few years back; but unless you're a 30 goal scorer in the NHL, you probably won't notice it. The point to all this seemingly useless information is to be comfortable with your stick and have it be an extension of your body.

Oh and Taping
Every hockey play does it and few know why. Most people think it's to stop the blade from grinding down but it's to help catch the puck on passes. In reality, receiving passes is a skill you need to learn and the tape is used to stop the blade from grinding down.

And BAM, that's all and more.

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04-27-2009, 02:49 AM
  #2
cptjeff
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Very nice summary, but quite wrong about not feeling it unless you're in the NHL. Aside from weight, which is very noticeable, The kickpoint and how quickly a stick releases are not that hard to feel. I can definitely feel a difference between an S17 and an Octane, for example. It's night and day. Differences between a Stealth and a one 95, both top end traditional flex sticks, will be harder to discern. Thinking of which, I need to get to a LHS to play around with a One95 soon...

It may not affect your game quite as much as it will for a pro, but you will be able to feel a difference.

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Old
04-27-2009, 03:03 AM
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSkatingDutchman View Post
I've worked in a pro for the past few years and day after day I see people buying the wrong sticks because they really don't know much about them. Even some people I work with don't know a whole lot about sticks. So here's the basic gist of it.

Flex
This is the most commonly misunderstood part of a stick. Flex is the amount of force you need to put on the stick for it to bend. Each composite (who uses wooden sticks anymore) stick has a flex number. This number ranges from the 80s to the low 100s. As a rule of thumb, the flex should be about half of your weight. For instance, I'm 175 and use an 87 flex.

IF YOU CUT THE STICK DOWN YOU WILL MAKE IT HARDER TO FLEX

This is a very important factor in buying a new stick, especially for a child or middle schooler. If your son is under 160 pounds then a composite stick will not help them at all. I've actually seen a bantam sit on a stick to make it bend and his parents bought it. Please, buy an age appropriate stick. Which brings me to my next point.

Length and Size
The butt of the stick should come up to your nose when your skates are off and your chin when you have your skates on. If you mess up the length you'll notice problems with stick handling and with slapshots.

Sticks also come in three different sizes Junior, Intermediate and Senior. These stick sizes correspond to the age of the person using them. The most misunderstood switch is from Intermediate to Senior. Parents will buy their son a $200 Senior stick and have it cut down for them. Please, buy a cheap stick until they get taller and add a bit of weight, hockey equipment is expensive as is so don't waste money.

Curve
The curve is the term used to describe the way the blade of the stick is bent. A curve can start in the heel (where the blade connects to the shaft), the middle or mid and the toe (the end of the blade). Every curve has a different depth, from slight to deep. The most important factor in a curve is the lie, which is the angle of the blade to the shaft. A lie is the best way to remember what kind of curve you prefer and is categorized from 1 to 7. A 1 curve is straight and a 7 is a near ridiculous angle. Most every stick made is from Lie 4 to 7.

This is all a matter of preference though and you will probably need to try different curves out before you find one that fits you well. Generally speaking, the higher the lie the easier it is to lift the puck off the ice. A deep curve does have setbacks though as it will hurt your backhand and make receiving passes more difficult.

THE MOST IMPORTANT THING TO KNOW ABOUT STICKS
Your stick needs to be relative to your, or your child's, skill level. A $200 stick is not going to turn a beginner into Ovechkin and no curve or flex will teach you the proper slapshot technique. Remember that you are taking the shot, not the stick.

And remember: there is a difference between top of the line composite sticks and discount ones from a few years back; but unless you're a 30 goal scorer in the NHL, you probably won't notice it. The point to all this seemingly useless information is to be comfortable with your stick and have it be an extension of your body.

Oh and Taping
Every hockey play does it and few know why. Most people think it's to stop the blade from grinding down but it's to help catch the puck on passes. In reality, receiving passes is a skill you need to learn and the tape is used to stop the blade from grinding down.

And BAM, that's all and more.
Sigh

Your "rule" on flex is just wrong, flex is preference... although most people use a flex that is to stiff for them. Phil Kessel, 192 lbs, uses a 75 flex stick. Brett Hull, 200 lbs, used a 65-75 flex stick. Ovechkin 220 lbs, 85 flex stick. Alexei Kovalev, 215 lbs, 120 flex stick.

The length of the stick is also preference and has a lot to do with the lie of the stick, the blade rocker, the skating style of the player and well their preference.

Junior, Int, Senior isn't correspondent to age as it is height, strength and preference. Phil Kessel has used intermediate sticks playing for the Bruins... that's in the NHL, oh and he's an adult by the way. You think that if he can use an intermediate stick in the NHL, a 28 year-old, 5'1" 105 girl might want to look at something besides a senior sized stick?

Lies go higher than 7. Look at a goalie stick, those are typically between 12-15.

You're an idiot if you think that a higher LIE makes it easier to "lift" the puck.

There isn't always a difference between older high-end sticks and current high-end sticks... and it certainly doesn't mean that the newest high-end stick is better.

Tape is used to help with wear and tear but it is also used to give some cushion and feel to the puck... as well as add grip to the blade to aid in shooting accuracy and puck control. This is pure preference as well.

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Old
04-27-2009, 07:44 AM
  #4
Evil Ted
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Yeah sticks are all personal preference, there is no super science to it its what your most comfortable with.

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04-27-2009, 11:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSkatingDutchman View Post

IF YOU CUT THE STICK DOWN YOU WILL MAKE IT HARDER TO FLEX

This is a very important factor in buying a new stick, especially for a child or middle schooler. If your son is under 160 pounds then a composite stick will not help them at all. I've actually seen a bantam sit on a stick to make it bend and his parents bought it. Please, buy an age appropriate stick. Which brings me to my next point.
I don't have kids but this statement made me curious. So long as money isn't an issue wouldn't some kids benefit from the lower weight of a composite (as opposed to a wood stick)?

Quote:
Sticks also come in three different sizes Junior, Intermediate and Senior. These stick sizes correspond to the age of the person using them. The most misunderstood switch is from Intermediate to Senior. Parents will buy their son a $200 Senior stick and have it cut down for them. Please, buy a cheap stick until they get taller and add a bit of weight, hockey equipment is expensive as is so don't waste money.
For a player like myself (39 years old, 200lbs, advanced beginner level) I understand that a Junior stick has a thinner shaft and the flex is geared for a smaller player. But what's the difference between Intermediate and Senior? I'm not sure I've seen many intermediate sticks at my local hockey shop. Is it even worth it for me to check one out?

Quote:
Curve
The curve is the term used to describe the way the blade of the stick is bent. A curve can start in the heel (where the blade connects to the shaft), the middle or mid and the toe (the end of the blade). Every curve has a different depth, from slight to deep. The most important factor in a curve is the lie, which is the angle of the blade to the shaft. A lie is the best way to remember what kind of curve you prefer and is categorized from 1 to 7. A 1 curve is straight and a 7 is a near ridiculous angle. Most every stick made is from Lie 4 to 7.

This is all a matter of preference though and you will probably need to try different curves out before you find one that fits you well. Generally speaking, the higher the lie the easier it is to lift the puck off the ice. A deep curve does have setbacks though as it will hurt your backhand and make receiving passes more difficult.
This is the part I'm most interested in -- I buy according to price first, then by flex and curve giving no thought about the lie. Just so I'm clear does a 7 lie mean the blade is at a 90 degree angle to the stick shaft? How do I settle on a lie that's best for me?

Thanks in advance and welcome to the forum.

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Old
04-27-2009, 11:23 AM
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TBLfan View Post
Sigh

Your "rule" on flex is just wrong, flex is preference... although most people use a flex that is to stiff for them. Phil Kessel, 192 lbs, uses a 75 flex stick. Brett Hull, 200 lbs, used a 65-75 flex stick. Ovechkin 220 lbs, 85 flex stick. Alexei Kovalev, 215 lbs, 120 flex stick.

The length of the stick is also preference and has a lot to do with the lie of the stick, the blade rocker, the skating style of the player and well their preference.

Junior, Int, Senior isn't correspondent to age as it is height, strength and preference. Phil Kessel has used intermediate sticks playing for the Bruins... that's in the NHL, oh and he's an adult by the way. You think that if he can use an intermediate stick in the NHL, a 28 year-old, 5'1" 105 girl might want to look at something besides a senior sized stick?

Lies go higher than 7. Look at a goalie stick, those are typically between 12-15.

You're an idiot if you think that a higher LIE makes it easier to "lift" the puck.

There isn't always a difference between older high-end sticks and current high-end sticks... and it certainly doesn't mean that the newest high-end stick is better.

Tape is used to help with wear and tear but it is also used to give some cushion and feel to the puck... as well as add grip to the blade to aid in shooting accuracy and puck control. This is pure preference as well.
Most of the things about flex, length, curves were, as he said, to be taken as a rule of thumb; a starting point. Yes, there are NHL players who use sticks with more flex than usual, who use intermediate sticks, sticks longer than usual, etc. I'm sure there are players who use sticks stiffer than (body weight / 2) too. Players have sticks longer than their chin, shorter than their chin. But in general, this blurb gives new players a good starting point regarding what kind of sticks they should be getting.

Yes, goalie sticks have lies from 11 to 15; but with all the talk about flex, shooting, etc I would have thought it was obvious that this was a blurb on player sticks. Guess not.

The only criticisms of yours I agree with is your point on high lie and raising the puck, and taping. I haven't heard any correspondence between lie and getting the puck up. It was always my thought that low lie sticks are for stickhandlers who like to keep the puck close to them, high lie sticks are more for defencemen and other players focused on shooting and stick-checking. (Then again, I'm a goalie, so I'm not too up-to-date on the intricacies of selecting different blades for the two-piece stick I use maybe a dozen times a year.)

And taping... yep, gives a better feel for the puck. I also tape my sticks heel-to-toe; as the puck goes down the blade on a wrist shot, it catches on the edges of the tape, helping to give it spin and thus improving accuracy (a spinning puck will go where you want it to go, unlike a knuckleball puck). Tape also helps with the durability of wooden blades, less of an issue with composite blades.

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Old
04-27-2009, 11:23 AM
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Dutchman:

I have a question you might be able to help me with:

I am trying to re-install a blade into my Easton S15...(shaft). The Sherwoood blade I put in has some 'play'....should I re-heat the shaft and try it again with more glue or what?

Anyone?


Last edited by Everest: 04-27-2009 at 11:28 AM.
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Old
04-27-2009, 11:30 AM
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Everest View Post
Dutchman:

I have a question you might be able to help me with:

I am trying to re-install a blade into my Easton S15...(shaft). The Sherwoood blade I put in has some 'play'....should I re-heat the shaft and try it again with more glue or what?

Anyone?
Strip of tape on the hosel, more glue.

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04-27-2009, 11:34 AM
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Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
Strip of tape on the hosel, more glue.
LOL. Ive played for 25 years and never heard the word 'hosel'. I assume thats the insert part of the wooden blade?

Thanks bro'!

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Old
04-27-2009, 11:50 AM
  #10
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The original post wasn't that bad, but the tone was way too condescending considering that some of the information is blatantly wrong.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSkatingDutchman View Post
If your son is under 160 pounds then a composite stick will not help them at all. I've actually seen a bantam sit on a stick to make it bend and his parents bought it.
WRONG. Obviously technique is the most important thing, but anyone can benefit from a lighter stick. Also, this contradicts what you wrote earlier about flex. Composite sticks have a wide range of flexes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSkatingDutchman View Post
The butt of the stick should come up to your nose when your skates are off and your chin when you have your skates on. If you mess up the length you'll notice problems with stick handling and with slapshots.
That's a good rule of thumb, but stick length is really a personal preference. Gretzky and Crosby use sticks that come up to their collar bone. Pavel Datsyuk and Jagr use sticks that come up to their eyes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSkatingDutchman View Post
Generally speaking, the higher the lie the easier it is to lift the puck off the ice.
WRONG. The proper lie is determined by skating style. Bent over (Gretzky) players use lower lies; Upright (Lemieux) players use higher lies. Lifting the puck has to do with the curve and also whether the face is open or closed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSkatingDutchman View Post
And remember: there is a difference between top of the line composite sticks and discount ones from a few years back; but unless you're a 30 goal scorer in the NHL, you probably won't notice it.
You don't have to be in the NHL to appreciate and take advantage of improved equipment. If you actually hang around some Midget level players, you'll hear about how the new Easton Synergy sticks have a better feel and less dead, tinny blades. Or how the Bauer Vapor XXXX has a great kickpoint for wristers.

Again, most of the OP information was solid, but you're going to get called out if you act like a know-it-all.

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04-27-2009, 12:04 PM
  #11
Devil Dancer
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As a 140lb, 5'7 adult, the original post is full of incorrect information.

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04-27-2009, 01:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Everest View Post
LOL. Ive played for 25 years and never heard the word 'hosel'. I assume thats the insert part of the wooden blade?

Thanks bro'!
No, hosel was miss-used. Hosel is the part of the blade below the shaft before the actual blade. The tenon is the part that goes into the shaft.

Put tape up one side of the tenon, over the top and down the other side. Heat shaft, insert blade.

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04-27-2009, 01:13 PM
  #13
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To the OP. I'd do a bit more homework before posting a thread claiming you know everything about sticks and more.

Your post points out some good basic guidelines but contains enough inaccuracies to discredit it. At the very least, the reader comes away with more questions then answers.

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04-27-2009, 01:16 PM
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by densetsu View Post
Most of the things about flex, length, curves were, as he said, to be taken as a rule of thumb; a starting point. Yes, there are NHL players who use sticks with more flex than usual, who use intermediate sticks, sticks longer than usual, etc. I'm sure there are players who use sticks stiffer than (body weight / 2) too. Players have sticks longer than their chin, shorter than their chin. But in general, this blurb gives new players a good starting point regarding what kind of sticks they should be getting.

Yes, goalie sticks have lies from 11 to 15; but with all the talk about flex, shooting, etc I would have thought it was obvious that this was a blurb on player sticks. Guess not.

The only criticisms of yours I agree with is your point on high lie and raising the puck, and taping. I haven't heard any correspondence between lie and getting the puck up. It was always my thought that low lie sticks are for stickhandlers who like to keep the puck close to them, high lie sticks are more for defencemen and other players focused on shooting and stick-checking. (Then again, I'm a goalie, so I'm not too up-to-date on the intricacies of selecting different blades for the two-piece stick I use maybe a dozen times a year.)

And taping... yep, gives a better feel for the puck. I also tape my sticks heel-to-toe; as the puck goes down the blade on a wrist shot, it catches on the edges of the tape, helping to give it spin and thus improving accuracy (a spinning puck will go where you want it to go, unlike a knuckleball puck). Tape also helps with the durability of wooden blades, less of an issue with composite blades.
I didn't see where he said it was a rule of thumb but regardless, it's a bunch of bull. I did include Kovalev who is supposed to be about 240 lbs to use his stick, someone get that man some doughnuts. This doesn't give players a good starting point. A beginner adult at 300 lbs, doesn't need a 150 flex stick! In fact, more than likely they need a 75-85 flex stick until they can get the technique down and adjust their stick flex accordingly.

With the goalie sticks comment... it was because he was defining a word. If you are going to define a word, you need to define it correctly.

If you don't agree with the rest of my post, then you are misinformed. I did not put one ounce of opinion or personal biased in there, it is all fact.

Quote:
For a player like myself (39 years old, 200lbs, advanced beginner level) I understand that a Junior stick has a thinner shaft and the flex is geared for a smaller player. But what's the difference between Intermediate and Senior? I'm not sure I've seen many intermediate sticks at my local hockey shop. Is it even worth it for me to check one out?
Intermediate sticks have smaller dimensions than senior but bigger than junior, length and flex are also between senior and junior sizes/flex.

...And on to the part I didn't address. You can easily tell the difference from low-end to high-end, specifically if you've used high-end before. Low end sticks, don't feel, perform or flex like a high-end stick. High fiberglass content make them stiffer and heavier than high-end sticks.

Quote:
This is the part I'm most interested in -- I buy according to price first, then by flex and curve giving no thought about the lie. Just so I'm clear does a 7 lie mean the blade is at a 90 degree angle to the stick shaft? How do I settle on a lie that's best for me?
No, a lie of 7 isn't even close to a 90 degree angle. To find the best lie for you, is really simple actually. When you turn over the tape on your blade how even is the wear? It should skew to the heel a little bit but it should be rather uniform. If there is much more wear on the heel, you need a lower lie or a shorter stick. If there's more wear on the toe, you need a higher lie or a longer stick. Do NOT go by Warrior marked lies, they aren't measured equally to other manufacturers marked lies.


Last edited by TBLfan: 04-27-2009 at 01:25 PM.
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04-27-2009, 01:20 PM
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EmptyNetter View Post
This is the part I'm most interested in -- I buy according to price first, then by flex and curve giving no thought about the lie. Just so I'm clear does a 7 lie mean the blade is at a 90 degree angle to the stick shaft? How do I settle on a lie that's best for me?
What I've been told to figure out if the lie you're using is right is to look at the tape on the bottom of your stick (after you've used it, of course). If the tape is worn pretty evenly along the bottom you're using the right lie. If the tape is worn more towards the toe then you need a higher lie. If the tape is worn more towards the heel then you need a lower lie. You could also just take a look at the blade of your stick when you're stickhandling - is most of it flat along the ice? If not, if the toe is off the ice you need a lower lie, if the heel is off you need a higher lie. Some curves have more of a rocker on the blade (the bottom of the blade is curved, not flat) which can make it harder to tell what the lie is and if its right for you.

The problem with finding the right curve can be that most curves only come in one lie. For example, the Modano/Forsberg/Malkin/PM9 curve is a 5 lie. I think the Sakic and it's clones are a 5.5 lie. My problem right now is that I need something with a lie of about 5 (currently using the PM9), but I want something more curved or more open and I'm having problems finding that.

I hope that helped and made sense.

Quote:
Originally Posted by densetsu View Post
The only criticisms of yours I agree with is your point on high lie and raising the puck, and taping. I haven't heard any correspondence between lie and getting the puck up. It was always my thought that low lie sticks are for stickhandlers who like to keep the puck close to them, high lie sticks are more for defencemen and other players focused on shooting and stick-checking. (Then again, I'm a goalie, so I'm not too up-to-date on the intricacies of selecting different blades for the two-piece stick I use maybe a dozen times a year.)
Other way around. A higher lie (ie, smaller angle between the blade and the shaft, like a 6 or 7 lie)) would let you carry the puck closer to your body, while a lower lie would let you carry the puck further away from your body. I don't know how much lie matters to the type of player you are or if its mostly just personal preference, but all else being equal what I said should be true.

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04-27-2009, 01:32 PM
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DevilsFan38 View Post
What I've been told to figure out if the lie you're using is right is to look at the tape on the bottom of your stick (after you've used it, of course). If the tape is worn pretty evenly along the bottom you're using the right lie. If the tape is worn more towards the toe then you need a higher lie. If the tape is worn more towards the heel then you need a lower lie. You could also just take a look at the blade of your stick when you're stickhandling - is most of it flat along the ice? If not, if the toe is off the ice you need a lower lie, if the heel is off you need a higher lie. Some curves have more of a rocker on the blade (the bottom of the blade is curved, not flat) which can make it harder to tell what the lie is and if its right for you.

The problem with finding the right curve can be that most curves only come in one lie. For example, the Modano/Forsberg/Malkin/PM9 curve is a 5 lie. I think the Sakic and it's clones are a 5.5 lie. My problem right now is that I need something with a lie of about 5 (currently using the PM9), but I want something more curved or more open and I'm having problems finding that.

I hope that helped and made sense.

You're exactly right, I was editing my post to add pretty much what you said as you posted.

Since the options of lie are limited, I typically adjust the stick length for lie. If you really want to try it, do it man. Whether it's trying a wood stick or a shaft/blade combo... Most of my sticks range from 57-60" depending on the lie/rocker of the blade. This range is about from my clavicle to mid-throat on skates. It takes some getting used to for stick length but by the end of warmups, I'm good.

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Old
04-27-2009, 01:34 PM
  #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DevilsFan38 View Post
Other way around. A higher lie (ie, smaller angle between the blade and the shaft, like a 6 or 7 lie)) would let you carry the puck closer to your body, while a lower lie would let you carry the puck further away from your body. I don't know how much lie matters to the type of player you are or if its mostly just personal preference, but all else being equal what I said should be true.
which lie you use has alot to do with your skating style. if you skate bent over more and leaning forward, you might want a lower lie, if you stand up right more you might want a higher lie

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04-27-2009, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by TBLfan View Post
Do NOT go by Warrior marked lies, they aren't measured equally to other manufacturers marked lies.
nor their flexes. except i think 100. good stuff tbl

there is alot of good, but conflicting information in this thread. i think i know which is correct.

the only thing i will really emphasize, because everything has basiaclly been said, is equipment is a preference

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04-27-2009, 02:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Gunnar Stahl 30 View Post
nor their flexes. except i think 100. good stuff tbl
Warrior has some issues with consistency. Some of their flex ratings are dead-on, some are lower than marked, some higher. I prefer pro stock because they mark the real flex on a label inside the shaft... which is typically within 2-3 of what the stick is actually marked at. Plus the 260 flex is perfect for me, I'm a 90-95 flex guy... obviously that's not available at retail.

With Warrior's lies, they are all marked as lower than they really are. Some by .5, some by a full lie, some by more. I think they measure the lie at the heel instead of the middle so it doesn't take in account for blade rocker or how the blade will really play.

Some of the BauerID patterns apparently have mis-marked lie too. I haven't seen the blades myself but I hear that the P12 is actually a true iginla clone. This means it's really a lie of 5.5 over the marked 7 lie.

Quote:
there is alot of good, but conflicting information in this thread. i think i know which is correct.

the only thing i will really emphasize, because everything has basiaclly been said, is equipment is a preference
You are exactly right, I have a friend that is 5'10, uses a 60" stick with a bonk curve... that's a lie of roughly 6.5-7. It's got a rather big rocker and it allows him to use more of his arm extension to his advantage... I'd find it uncomfortable but it works for him.

About the conflicting information, I don't want to come off like I think I'm an authority but I hear a lot of opinions like this guy says. I know I'm right because; If you've been around message boards with hockey players you'll see many of these threads and it all comes to the same conclusion. As a coach of adult beginners, you watch and see how adults react to learning a new game. I've personally seen guys that are 300lbs and can't get a good shot with a 100 flex stick because they can't flex it. Sometimes we forget that not everyone is on the same level/same body type/same muscle to fat ratio/etc... as we're personally used to.

I have my reasonings for using a certain stick length and taping a certain way, etc... but I don't want to push anyone towards those because that's not going to help them.


Last edited by TBLfan: 04-27-2009 at 02:49 PM.
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04-27-2009, 02:49 PM
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Question, I'm about 5 foot 6, 145 but 23 years old. Can I get an intermediate stick? All the senior sticks are too stiff after I cut them down.

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04-27-2009, 02:51 PM
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Originally Posted by WickedWrister View Post
Question, I'm about 5 foot 6, 145 but 23 years old. Can I get an intermediate stick? All the senior sticks are too stiff after I cut them down.
You are a perfect candidate to try an intermediate stick. They aren't THAT short, 57" long which is 3" shorter than a senior stick... Actually, senior OPSs used to come at 57" with a wood plug. I'm 6'1 and I could play with an intermediate stick if they were stiffer.

Also you can consider newer-line high-end Easton sticks, their new flex rating system is marked higher than they really are. For example, a S17 100 flex stick is 100 flex with 3" cut off. So in reality, the 100 flex S17 is closer to 80 flex.

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04-27-2009, 02:57 PM
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You are exactly right, I have a friend that is 5'10, uses a 60" stick with a bonk curve... that's a lie of roughly 6.5-7. It's got a rather big rocker and it allows him to use more of his arm extension to his advantage... I'd find it uncomfortable but it works for him.

About the conflicting information, I don't want to come off like I think I'm an authority but I hear a lot of opinions like this guy says. I know I'm right because; If you've been around message boards with hockey players you'll see many of these threads and it all comes to the same conclusion. As a coach of adult beginners, you watch and see how adults react to learning a new game. I've personally seen guys that are 300lbs and can't get a good shot with a 100 flex stick because they can't flex it. Sometimes we forget that not everyone is on the same level/same body type/same muscle to fat ratio/etc... as we're personally used to.

I have my reasonings for using a certain stick length and taping a certain way, etc... but I don't want to push anyone towards those because that's not going to help them.
completely agree. my brother uses a stick that goes up to his mid chest, but it works for him, he has a great shot....kind of sucks for me though cause i prefer one that goes a little below my chin so its hard for us to share sticks

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04-27-2009, 03:38 PM
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Originally Posted by WickedWrister View Post
Question, I'm about 5 foot 6, 145 but 23 years old. Can I get an intermediate stick? All the senior sticks are too stiff after I cut them down.
I'm a little taller and a little heavier then you and I've thought long and hard about using one. I probably would have by now if I didn't jump to a tapered set up.

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04-27-2009, 04:14 PM
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Originally Posted by WickedWrister View Post
Question, I'm about 5 foot 6, 145 but 23 years old. Can I get an intermediate stick? All the senior sticks are too stiff after I cut them down.
Definitely. I'm 5'8" and use an intermediate (and I can barely flex that, there's no way I could flex a senior stick). The last stick I bought was actually the perfect height for me, came right to where I wanted without having to cut anything off.

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04-27-2009, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by WickedWrister View Post
Question, I'm about 5 foot 6, 145 but 23 years old. Can I get an intermediate stick? All the senior sticks are too stiff after I cut them down.
Sure. As a guy nearly identical to you in stats, I use a 85 or 80 flex tapered shaft (depending on which stick I'm using). I can bend it, but I'm planning on getting a 70 flex next time I need a stick. An intermediate isn't that much removed from that.

Hey, Phil Kessel uses/used intermediate sticks, (I think he's using 70 flex seniors right now), so there's no reason you can't.

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