HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

New guy finally ready

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
05-06-2009, 08:32 AM
  #1
csohio
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Country: United States
Posts: 23
vCash: 500
New guy finally ready

I think I am ready to play! I am just starting out and have been slowly buying used gear to play adult rec league hockey. I am going to buy gloves today and then I think I have everything. I hope to sign up for a hockey class which starts tomorrow night.

Here is what I have, am I missing anything?

Helmet
mouth guard
shoulder pads
jersey
socks
pants
jock
compression shirt
elbow pads
shin pads
sticks
gloves
water bottle
skates

csohio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-06-2009, 08:46 AM
  #2
91
Registered User
 
91's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: the ghetto
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,821
vCash: 500
sounds like you are pretty well set... cage for your helmet maybe?

neck guard if you want to be a tiny bit safer too... i personally don't wear one and haven't for a long time

91 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-06-2009, 10:31 AM
  #3
joeydzzle
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 24
vCash: 500
cage definitely. if you're playing in a noob league (like i am) most of the players don't really have control of thier stick/know what they are doing. You don't want to get whacked in the face with a stick or go face first into the boards unprotected.

joeydzzle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-06-2009, 10:53 AM
  #4
EmptyNetter
Registered User
 
EmptyNetter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: North Shore, MA
Country: United States
Posts: 7,541
vCash: 500
Hockey bag?

Regarding socks --
In addition to the stockings you'll wear over your shin pad I recommend wearing a pair of nylon (or polyester) liner socks on your feet. Cotton socks are horrible -- between the sweat they absorb and the abrasion they're sure to cause a few blisters. Actually, I'm a big fan of nylon/polyester everything -- undershirt, shorts, socks, leggings, etc. The fabric keeps you relatively dry and light.

Otherwise you've got all your gear. You might want to practice dressing -- figure out what to put on first, second, third. . . last. Get a sense of how heavy it all is. Also, give some thought to how you'll pack everything in your bag. There's so much gear to keep track of and to put on. The more consistent your routine the less worry you'll have before a game about whether you remembered to pack something, etc.

EmptyNetter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-06-2009, 12:08 PM
  #5
buddhahat
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Kilmartin, Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 29
vCash: 500
I would also grab two towels and stuff them in your bag - one for wiping down your skate blades and one for drying yourself off. I also carry a small carpet doormat to put under my feet in the dressing room to keep my feet dry - or a pair of Crocs or similar - wet socks in skates

Personally I don't wear shoulder pads in my rec hockey league - but I wore the smallest pair I could find when playing competitive - it's a comfort thing, I prefer none. It's a minor loss of weight to carry around.

I wear a visor instead of a cage because I wear glasses and it's easier to wipe them off if you have to.

Couple of practice pucks and knock yourself out.

buddhahat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-06-2009, 12:12 PM
  #6
buddhahat
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Kilmartin, Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 29
vCash: 500
Oh and a few rolls of white, black and shin pad tape. Good way to make friends is to always have tape to lend

buddhahat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-06-2009, 01:04 PM
  #7
DevilsFan38
Registered User
 
DevilsFan38's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Jersey
Country: United States
Posts: 12,425
vCash: 500
I'll echo everyone else here and say definitely a cage. Also, you probably bought these when you got your skates, but in case you didn't don't forget soakers to put on your blades.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EmptyNetter View Post
Hockey bag?

Regarding socks --
In addition to the stockings you'll wear over your shin pad I recommend wearing a pair of nylon (or polyester) liner socks on your feet. Cotton socks are horrible -- between the sweat they absorb and the abrasion they're sure to cause a few blisters. Actually, I'm a big fan of nylon/polyester everything -- undershirt, shorts, socks, leggings, etc. The fabric keeps you relatively dry and light.

Otherwise you've got all your gear. You might want to practice dressing -- figure out what to put on first, second, third. . . last. Get a sense of how heavy it all is. Also, give some thought to how you'll pack everything in your bag. There's so much gear to keep track of and to put on. The more consistent your routine the less worry you'll have before a game about whether you remembered to pack something, etc.
I second all of this. I was very glad I figured out how to put on all the gear at home and didn't wait until I got to the rink

DevilsFan38 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-06-2009, 01:51 PM
  #8
pspeezy
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Country: Slovakia
Posts: 24
vCash: 500
definitely agree with all the 'figure out how to put your gear on at home' advice.

get to your practices/classes/games a little early so that you aren't rushing anything.

also try and leave some time to stretch off-ice. i see alot of guys stretching on the ice, but i think you'll find that ice time is precious and that once you get on you'll want to focus on things you can only do out there.

good luck!

pspeezy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-06-2009, 03:31 PM
  #9
Hockeyfan68
Registered User
 
Hockeyfan68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lewiston, ME USA
Country: United States
Posts: 2,418
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by csohio View Post
I think I am ready to play! I am just starting out and have been slowly buying used gear to play adult rec league hockey. I am going to buy gloves today and then I think I have everything. I hope to sign up for a hockey class which starts tomorrow night.

Here is what I have, am I missing anything?

Helmet
mouth guard
shoulder pads
jersey
socks
pants
jock
compression shirt
elbow pads
shin pads
sticks
gloves
water bottle
skates
Wow ... well have fun! You'll probably over time tweak your stuff here and there. I tried the compression shirts and didn't like them so I went back to longsleeve cotton shirts. Everyone is different I guess.

I like the sweat buildup and being soaked with sweat and some people hate it. Some guys use two pair of gloves in a game and hate wet gloves. I love wet gloves .... maybe I'm just gross but whatever.

The recommendations above for wearing a faceshield for a beginner or rec league is highly good advice. I don't play with any face shield or even a visor and I should. I spend a lot of time watching my face when around a "sloppy player" as I call them whether a beginner or someone who hasn't played for 20 years and shows up at shinny hockey or whatever.

I grew up in the late 70s and early 80s and didn't play with one and it stuck. Now I can't get used to them. Every year I try one out and take it off.

I want to try one of those newer ones that are made to focus what you are looking at so you do not lose depth in field of vision like the ones I have tried already.

I have had a couple of teeth knocked out by pucks over the years and honestly a visor would not have protected that and I was wearing a mouthguard which you should wear! I have 2 facial cuts one above one eye the visor WOULD have prevented and another around the same eye that would have also been prevented.

With problems like detaching retinas from eye trauma and scratched corneas etc eye wear is necessary. I'm on it and will find something that prevents losing a normal field of vision to wear in games. The technology is up to snuff nowadays finally so I should get on it and make sure you do too.

Anyway have fun with the game ... it is the coolest game to play and also the hardest but fun when you start out and even more fun later on when you start getting good at it.

Hockeyfan68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-06-2009, 04:46 PM
  #10
Pog Form
Registered User
 
Pog Form's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Toronto, ON
Country: Canada
Posts: 701
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
Wow ... well have fun! You'll probably over time tweak your stuff here and there. I tried the compression shirts and didn't like them so I went back to longsleeve cotton shirts. Everyone is different I guess.

I like the sweat buildup and being soaked with sweat and some people hate it. Some guys use two pair of gloves in a game and hate wet gloves. I love wet gloves .... maybe I'm just gross but whatever.
I'm the same way. Love having the soaking wet undershirt at the end of the game. It doesn't feel right if I'm not drenched in sweat.

Pog Form is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-06-2009, 04:51 PM
  #11
Pog Form
Registered User
 
Pog Form's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Toronto, ON
Country: Canada
Posts: 701
vCash: 500
Oh, and to OP: all I can say is go out and have some fun! Hockey is the greatest.

Pog Form is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-06-2009, 05:32 PM
  #12
csohio
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Country: United States
Posts: 23
vCash: 500
I'm signed up and ready to go.....I think. I have a helmet with a cage; I won't be able to avoid every puck and stick to the face. I also have tape and a bag. I will have to look into the nylon socks you recommend. Thanks for the note about two towels; I only planned for one until I read your post.

I have put the gear on twice today to practice.....I'm sure I'll still look lost tomorrow. The hockey class is a beginners class, so I'm sure I will not be the only guy a little slow and confused.

Thanks everyone.

csohio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-06-2009, 11:31 PM
  #13
shotty
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 68
vCash: 500
i love how "compression shirt" made it on the list.

shotty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-07-2009, 09:34 AM
  #14
buddhahat
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Kilmartin, Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 29
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by shotty View Post
i love how "compression shirt" made it on the list.
Be nice. The sports marketing machines grind up anything in their path.

Besides, look how many rec players there are with $300 sticks. He'll get more value out of his shirt than Joe Wristshot will out of his ultra-fibre superblaster 6000.

buddhahat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-07-2009, 01:52 PM
  #15
cptjeff
[insert joke here]
 
cptjeff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Washington, DC.
Country: United States
Posts: 8,757
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by buddhahat View Post
Be nice. The sports marketing machines grind up anything in their path.

Besides, look how many rec players there are with $300 sticks. He'll get more value out of his shirt than Joe Wristshot will out of his ultra-fibre superblaster 6000.
Ya know, all of the technology really does make a difference. A wicking compression shirt is much more comfortable in a game then a cotton undershirt, and a high end stick is much lighter and more responsive. If it wasn't better, nobody would buy it.

Oh, and wristshots are where top end OPS really make the most difference. FYI.

cptjeff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-07-2009, 05:55 PM
  #16
raganblink
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Mexico
Country: Balearic Islands
Posts: 118
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by buddhahat View Post
Be nice. The sports marketing machines grind up anything in their path.

Besides, look how many rec players there are with $300 sticks. He'll get more value out of his shirt than Joe Wristshot will out of his ultra-fibre superblaster 6000.
300? You are buying overpriced sticks. S17 should be at 260 (CAN), which would be the most expensive stick.

raganblink is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-07-2009, 10:50 PM
  #17
buddhahat
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Kilmartin, Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 29
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
Ya know, all of the technology really does make a difference. A wicking compression shirt is much more comfortable in a game then a cotton undershirt, and a high end stick is much lighter and more responsive. If it wasn't better, nobody would buy it.

Oh, and wristshots are where top end OPS really make the most difference. FYI.
Geez, thanks for clearing that up Gordie. My point is 99% of the players on the ice aren't going to make proper use of 10% of the technology. That's like saying "I drive a 911 therefore I'm ready for F1". And if you think a $300 stick is going to turn you into Brett Hull, well, I wish I owned a Sportchek.

buddhahat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-07-2009, 10:51 PM
  #18
buddhahat
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Kilmartin, Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 29
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by raganblink View Post
300? You are buying overpriced sticks. S17 should be at 260 (CAN), which would be the most expensive stick.
I use a Sherwood 4050.

buddhahat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-07-2009, 11:18 PM
  #19
cptjeff
[insert joke here]
 
cptjeff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Washington, DC.
Country: United States
Posts: 8,757
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by buddhahat View Post
Geez, thanks for clearing that up Gordie. My point is 99% of the players on the ice aren't going to make proper use of 10% of the technology. That's like saying "I drive a 911 therefore I'm ready for F1". And if you think a $300 stick is going to turn you into Brett Hull, well, I wish I owned a Sportchek.
Well, that's what I'm saying is wrong. Yeah, you may not get full use out of it, but you will be able to get a nice boost out of the weight in the form of faster stickhandling, and your shot will have a much better pop if you buy the right flex. It won't make you Brett Hull. Not even the people who make them claim that. The only people who trot out that line are the "wood sticks are the absolute exact same except for price" people. You're not going to be an NHL player instantly. But your shot probalby will improve, and your stickhandling probably will speed up.

Some players won't get much benefit out of them at all, but we're talking absolute beginners here, not everybody but NHLers. Guys who can't shoot and stickhandle anyway.

Try one in a game and I'll bet you'll shut up instantly.

If you want to keep using that argument however, use it for top end skates. Much more valid there.

cptjeff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-07-2009, 11:32 PM
  #20
buddhahat
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Kilmartin, Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 29
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
Well, that's what I'm saying is wrong. Yeah, you may not get full use out of it, but you will be able to get a nice boost out of the weight in the form of faster stickhandling, and your shot will have a much better pop if you buy the right flex. It won't make you Brett Hull. Not even the people who make them claim that. The only people who trot out that line are the "wood sticks are the absolute exact same except for price" people. You're not going to be an NHL player instantly. But your shot probalby will improve, and your stickhandling probably will speed up.

Some players won't get much benefit out of them at all, but we're talking absolute beginners here, not everybody but NHLers. Guys who can't shoot and stickhandle anyway.

Try one in a game and I'll bet you'll shut up instantly.

If you want to keep using that argument however, use it for top end skates. Much more valid there.
Here, c'mon, let's take a look in my garage where my wife regularly complains I have too much hockey crap. I have several composite sticks, a few aluminum shafts, there's my bench where I make my particular brand of curve I like . . . but I digress. I've tried all kinds of sticks in games and it always boils down to the guy pulling the trigger.

There's a new guy here ready to start playing some rec hockey. Let's not fill him full of the crap that a expensive piece of equipment is going to make a difference when you are already qualifying your stellar wisdom: "But your shot probalby will improve, and your stickhandling probably will speed up." This is the kind of thinking that prices hockey out of the reach of a lot of people.

I use a wood stick when I play league because it a little heavier and harder to knock off of the puck when I go to the net. So I have to use a little more muscle to stickhandle and shoot, it's not a real hardship. It's the player not the equipment.

buddhahat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-08-2009, 08:25 AM
  #21
Hockeyfan68
Registered User
 
Hockeyfan68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lewiston, ME USA
Country: United States
Posts: 2,418
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by buddhahat View Post
Here, c'mon, let's take a look in my garage where my wife regularly complains I have too much hockey crap. I have several composite sticks, a few aluminum shafts, there's my bench where I make my particular brand of curve I like . . . but I digress. I've tried all kinds of sticks in games and it always boils down to the guy pulling the trigger.

There's a new guy here ready to start playing some rec hockey. Let's not fill him full of the crap that a expensive piece of equipment is going to make a difference when you are already qualifying your stellar wisdom: "But your shot probalby will improve, and your stickhandling probably will speed up." This is the kind of thinking that prices hockey out of the reach of a lot of people.

I use a wood stick when I play league because it a little heavier and harder to knock off of the puck when I go to the net. So I have to use a little more muscle to stickhandle and shoot, it's not a real hardship. It's the player not the equipment.
While I agree with it is the carpenter and not his tools assessment to some degree I can tell you (I'm 40 years old and switched to composites in December) that I got some of my lost shot back which happens when you get older through no choice of your own.

I can honestly tell you that I got my velocity back by using a composite stick. Now this being said my broither uses wood and aluminums still and he tried my composites one day and was sold on them too.

I think mainly the composite is a better performer in one timers and touch passes and things of that sort rather than actually shooting a slapshot BUT I did get some extra zip back on my shot. Not sure if it was actual increase in power from the stick or a better weight transfer because of the material because I had lost a little bit of from getting old of my great mechanics I have always had or not.

Wrist shots are improved and noticable. Things like making cross ice saucer passes have a great feel as well. Wood sticks have that though ... one cannot argue the feel of a wood stick. The composite 2 piece setups I use have good blades which transfer the same "feel" of the puck as wood. I did buy one blade that isdead as far as feel goes and I also have 3 Montreal graphite blades with wood hosels that also are dead and have ZERO feel. You feel like you have to look to see if the puck is on your blade.

My composite blades I like do NOT do that and the feel is as good as wood. The best thing I appreciate about the composite blades is that until the blade finally breaks it is like new where a wood blade starts to give and lose flex and eventually has a dent the height of the puck in it and then cracks either from that puck dent from use or the blade splits apart on the bottom from moisture.

I will also add that the money I have saved buying a $50 composite blade compared to a $24.99 wood blade is amazing. I would go through 5 woodies for every composite blade so far. I play at least twice a week and more in the winter time and have broken only ONE composite blade. Just ONE and would have easily used up 5 maybe even 6 woodies by now.

I WAS one of those who swore by wood sticks and now has a closet that has 4 unused wood sticks and about 5 aluminum shafts with a few blades of wood sitting collecting dust.

yeah when I used my brother's woody I launched bombs but it did not have as good of a "launch" or fluid flowthrough "sweet spot" I get with the composite.

Yeah Al Iafrate and Al McInnis set slapshot speed records using wood but even an NHL coach Ron Wilson stated that McInnia would have been untouchable today using the composite sticks and his slapper would have been 115 to 120mph according to him.

This is all arguable of course since there really isn't any proof other than what one feels using them but I can atest that they did resurrect my shot and release. I have always been a pretty good hockey player and when i started to lose some zip from getting old I was concerned.

I swear though that absolutely composites helped me regain what I had lost. Not sure where I will be at 50 but for now I am satisfied.

Another thing to keep in mind is that you can use a medium priced composite stick or shaft with a good blade to resemble the heavier weight you require as you stated. The medium priced stuff is heavier than the expensive sticks but still lighter than wood. This depends on the wood stick too, I have used some light woodies too.

Basically though going back to the age thing with me the lighter composite stick definitely has helped me to be quicker with my hands at an older age.

I am never going back to wood ever. Also keep in mind that traditonal golfers also balked at using graphite and aluminum metal or composites for golf clubs ... until they used them.

Now they are the standard and playing with a wood golf club just is never going to happen again.


Last edited by Hockeyfan68: 05-08-2009 at 08:32 AM.
Hockeyfan68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-08-2009, 09:32 AM
  #22
stick9
Registered User
 
stick9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Country: United States
Posts: 9,941
vCash: 500
Quote:
I will also add that the money I have saved buying a $50 composite blade compared to a $24.99 wood blade is amazing. I would go through 5 woodies for every composite blade so far. I play at least twice a week and more in the winter time and have broken only ONE composite blade. Just ONE and would have easily used up 5 maybe even 6 woodies by now.
Weren't you just rattling on about the lack of durability of composite sticks in another thread? Only to praise them here in this one...? Your post reads like sales pitch for composite sticks.

Back to the OP. Pick yourself up some good skate socks. You won't regret it. Here are a few examples. I myself use the Under Armour ones and love em.

http://www.hockeymonkey.com/under-ar...iner-sock.html

http://www.hockeymonkey.com/bauer-ho...rformance.html

http://www.hockeymonkey.com/ccm-oxysox.html

While we are on the subject. Get yourself a good sweat wicking under shirt. I recommend going with a long sleeve shirt so you'll have something under your elbow pads. The bacteria that can build up inside hockey equipment can be nasty. Plus, this will help keep you cool and help prevent your equipment from smelling like crap. Under Armour is the most popular name but almost everyone makes them. You can find them at your local sporting goods store.

Oh, and get cage for your helmet. I don't need to tell you why. Take it from someone who's gone face first into the dasher.

stick9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-08-2009, 09:39 AM
  #23
buddhahat
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Kilmartin, Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 29
vCash: 500
Look, I'm not a curmudgeon railing against new technology. I've tried composites I prefer wood, even some pros still use wood. That's not my issue. I even have a stick with an Oggie on it - Google that and try to tell me I'm afraid of new technology

The way this thing started was a new guy posted his list of equipment. Someone made a snide comment about his compression shirt. I said be nice, better he bought that than a $300 stick. I have no problems with a $75 composite stick as they last longer than a wood stick.

My point is that as long as the equipment manufacturers can sell a 2 mph advantage to your shot to the great unwashed (for only $299!!!), hockey will become too expensive for the average person to enjoy. Already in my area, we have to do equipment swaps and donations and fund raising drives just to keep the kids in the game.

Technology is a wonderful thing for all the weekend warriors. I'm glad you have money to burn and get a little more juice on your shot. If you have unused sticks and shafts cluttering up your garages, I'll take them. I'll cut them down and buy new blades and give them to the kids who desperately want the new NikeBok 6750 XXX because they saw it on TV but whose parents can't afford skates that fit because their hours have been cut down at the plant.

buddhahat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-08-2009, 01:07 PM
  #24
csohio
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Country: United States
Posts: 23
vCash: 500
Thanks everyone for the advice. I had a blast last night. I found I really need to work on hockey stops; it was totally different in full pads! I have a cage and found a comfortable shirt. I am trying to get comfortable with a right handed stick. It just doesn't "feel" right, so I picked up a wooden lefty today to try. I'm sticking with a wood stick for now until I can get the fundamentals down; then I'll look at better sticks that will help me speed up.....I'm not looking for speed yet!

csohio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-08-2009, 01:24 PM
  #25
buddhahat
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Kilmartin, Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 29
vCash: 500
Good for you!!!! Just ignore us and enjoy the sport!!!!


buddhahat is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:24 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.