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Rule Changes...Explanation?

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09-25-2004, 01:55 PM
  #1
rockon83
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Rule Changes...Explanation?

Got this from http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/columns/story?id=1888013

"On the ice, the AHL will once provide a testing ground for the NHL and its perpetual search to speed of the game and increase offense with a series of rule and format changes. Among those changes are no-touch icing, tag-up offsides, goal lines moved two feet closer to the end boards, from 13 to 11 feet and an expansion of the width of the blue lines and red line from 12 inches to 24 inches. A shootout will decide tie games after a five-minute overtime session."

What is tag up offsides?
What does changing the width of the blue and red lines do?

I read in the OSHL they totally removed the red line. What does that do?

Sorry for my ignorance, and thanks for any answers...

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09-25-2004, 02:00 PM
  #2
Joe T Choker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockon83
Got this from http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/columns/story?id=1888013

"On the ice, the AHL will once provide a testing ground for the NHL and its perpetual search to speed of the game and increase offense with a series of rule and format changes. Among those changes are no-touch icing, tag-up offsides, goal lines moved two feet closer to the end boards, from 13 to 11 feet and an expansion of the width of the blue lines and red line from 12 inches to 24 inches. A shootout will decide tie games after a five-minute overtime session."

What is tag up offsides?
What does changing the width of the blue and red lines do?

I read in the OSHL they totally removed the red line. What does that do?

Sorry for my ignorance, and thanks for any answers...
Removing the red line is a horrible idea...Brian Burke explained why it is a bad idea some time ago...it prevents defensemen from pinching in more and playing more conservatively and less agressive.

tag up offsides sounds like just what it is...said player that is offside can skate back out of the zone and then go back and chase the puck without having to wait for the defenseman to play the puck out of the zone.

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09-25-2004, 06:54 PM
  #3
NYR469
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockon83
What is tag up offsides?
the tag-up rule is how it was until a few years ago. last year if the puck came out of the zone and then was sent back into the offensive zone and any offensive player was in the zone the play would be whistled.

with the tag-up rule, in that situation the offensive team will be given a change to get back on sides by 'tagging up'. that means that the offensive players in the offensive zone have to skate out of the zone passe the blueline and then they can go back into the zone after the puck. note that if any offensive player touches the puck in the offensive zone before all teammates are back onsides, the play is offsides. also if the offensive players aren't trying to get out of the zone the ref can blow the whistle...

the main purpose of this is to keep the flow of the game going, it will result in less pointless whistles and faceoffs and keep the game going.

the rule was changed a few years ago because they thought that dmen weren't developing enough skill because they could just dump the puck back in and removing the tag-up rule forced them to stickhandle till their teammates got out of the zone. but the lower levels were skill is developed didn't make the change so it was pointless once players got to the nhl.

Quote:
What does changing the width of the blue and red lines do?
try to find a copy of last years THN yearbook. that is where this idea was first proposed and it is explained in depth.

basically the idea is to artificially make the playing surface bigger (sort of uses the 2+2=5 theory of math). the blueline is part of both the neutral zone and offensive/defensive zone depending on what side the puck is on. the offensive zone is 60ft from the goalline to the back-edge of the blueline. if you make the blueline 2ft wider then the result is the offensive zone becomes 62 ft...at the same time the neutral zone gets expanded by 4ft (2 on each side) and more space in the neutral zone makes it easier to get thru and as far as two-line passes go the max length of a pass is extended by 4ft. with the redline, you also effect the distance an onside pass can go but it also means 2 less feet a team has to go to gain the redline and avoid an icing. how many times do you see a guy dump the puck just short of the redline and get called for icing?

the biggest complaint about this rule is that it changes the look of the ice and people say it looks stupid. but cosmetics aside if it works people will get used to it (people complained about advertisments on the boards when they first started, but now it looks weird to see a game without them)...

and i'll also note that in the THN yearbook the prosposed idea was to expand the lines from 1ft to 6ft but they opted to not go that drastic because people were complaining about the way it would look. the problem with that is if you only expand to 3 ft then you've cut the potential benefit in half so it probably won't work as well in practice as it does in theory.

Quote:
I read in the OSHL they totally removed the red line. What does that do?
when they say 'remove the redline' what it really means is get rid of the two-line pass rule. the redline will still physically be on the ice and will be used for icing but two-line passes will no longer be whistled...

right now a pass can't cross 2 lines. so if a team is in their defensize zone the furthest they can pass it is to the redline, if the teammate receiving the pass is across the redline the play is offsides...with 'no red line' you can pass from your own defensive zone all the way to the blueline of our offensive zone. so you can fire a pass from your own goalline to the far blueline...the resulting effect is that dmen have to back up further to make sure opposing forwards don't get behind them which means the gap between the forwards and dmen is widened and as a result playing a trap becomes real difficult.

the major downside to this rule is that most players don't have the skill to make a 180ft pass. making a tape-to-tape pass from your goalline to the far blueline is alot easier said then done and combined with no touch icing that means that everytime someone tries one of these homerun passes and misses it will be an icing so it probably will lead to more icings. it could also lead to more cherry-picking...

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09-25-2004, 06:57 PM
  #4
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something else to remember with these rule changes is that there is no single change that is going to fix the problems of the league so they are trying lots of different things with the theory that if each change helps a little bit when you add those things together it will make a major change...

also we can agrue the pros and cons of each idea in theory until the cows come home and still not know if they would help or not. so the best thing they can do is to put some rules into effect and try them. they won't all work but hopefully some will work and then next year or 2 years from now you can remove the changes that aren't working and then try additional changes to see how those do...

trial and error is the only way to do it...it'll take some time but its the only way.

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09-26-2004, 09:35 PM
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rockon83
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dude, you're the man. thanks a lot. the explanation of expanding the blue and red lines made a lot of sense. the tag up offsides make sense too, in changing the rule, but i'm unclear as to what will now be offsides.

if the puck ends up outside the offensive zone, the dmen can pass the puck back into the offensive zone - as long as no one touches it inside the zone - till they've all tagged up? or are the dmen allowed to bring the puck back into the zone, and only anyone tagged up can play it?

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09-27-2004, 08:50 PM
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They don't have the two line pass in college hockey(no red line rule), and those players always make passes that connect from the goal line all the way to the other teams blue line; creates lots of break aways. Wouldn't that help against the trap?

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09-27-2004, 09:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilcircuit
They don't have the two line pass in college hockey(no red line rule), and those players always make passes that connect from the goal line all the way to the other teams blue line; creates lots of break aways. Wouldn't that help against the trap?
It's 'offside pass' dammit.

Sorry, I just have a pet peeve when it comes to terms from the rulebook. It comes from being an official.

Anyway, I have been officiating hockey without the centre line for the offside pass purpose for a few years now. At first, teams looked for the long bomb pass, but teams just kept one defenceman back shadow any cherry pickers that came their way. If anything, it made the game more defensive to start with.

After about a month into the first season the rule was taken out of the BCHL and minor hockey in Canada, teams just played how they used to. They stopped hunting for the long pass and simply took it whenever the chance came along. Most passes that would have been offside under the old rules would have only been offside by 1-3 feet.

Long story short, I see no major difference in style of play with or without the centre line for offside passes.


Last edited by BCCHL inactive: 09-27-2004 at 09:35 PM.
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Old
09-27-2004, 09:46 PM
  #8
Joe T Choker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Van
It's 'offside pass' dammit.

Sorry, I just have a pet peeve when it comes to terms from the rulebook. It comes from being an official.

Anyway, I have been officiating hockey without the centre line for the offside pass purpose for a few years now. At first, teams looked for the long bomb pass, but teams just kept one defenceman back shadow any cherry pickers that came their way. If anything, it made the game more defensive to start with.
Isn't that why Burke said that the Red Line shouldn't be removed in the NHL/AHL?

Burke is pretty freaking smart guy!

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