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Warming Up Tips

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05-25-2009, 01:56 AM
  #1
TheGooooch
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Warming Up Tips

So last weekend I played a roller hockey game at 9 and an ice game at 10:30 (both at night). I figured I would be dead tired after playing the roller game but it was quite the opposite. I had a ton of jump and didn't suffer from jello legs. Tonight I only had an ice game so I ran a mile about an hour before the game in an attempt to get my legs going, but it didn't seem to help that much.

Basically, any tips for warming up to prevent jello legs? I am probably going to get a bike or something since running just sucks IMO. Or should I just start working my legs out more?

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05-25-2009, 02:06 AM
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Hockeyfan68
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Originally Posted by TheGooooch View Post
So last weekend I played a roller hockey game at 9 and an ice game at 10:30 (both at night). I figured I would be dead tired after playing the roller game but it was quite the opposite. I had a ton of jump and didn't suffer from jello legs. Tonight I only had an ice game so I ran a mile about an hour before the game in an attempt to get my legs going, but it didn't seem to help that much.

Basically, any tips for warming up to prevent jello legs? I am probably going to get a bike or something since running just sucks IMO. Or should I just start working my legs out more?
Hmmm that sounds more like a stamina issue. Jello legs usually happens when not enough exercise is done.

I play hockey often and do not have jello legs because of it. You should be able to play hockey for quite some time and not feel jello legs. Fatigue from playing a couple of hours is normal but a weak rubbery leg feeling is not. I've only had that when taking long periods off from playing which was caused by injuries and that was unavoidable.

You may want to do some leg exercises like riding a bike or a stair type exercise. Squats maybe or something that you can build endurance with.

I'm not sure warming up before exercising will help very much.

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05-25-2009, 02:13 AM
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TheGooooch
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But it is more of a feeling at the beginning of a game. Like tonight for instance, we had a short bench and everyone was gassed early on because we had to do long shifts and everything. But when the 3rd period rolled around, I had more jump in my step and was able to skate harder for longer periods of time. I usually hit a couple free skate stick and pucks in the week and a roller pickup (3 hours). Maybe I just need to do more during the day. Sunday is my homework/study day and at night I play hockey. Perhaps it is the fact that I am not that active throughout the day that it is having this effect (or affect, I hate that one).

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05-25-2009, 09:06 AM
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How long and how hard should you warm up before a game? 3 minutes from getting on the ice until the puck drops is obviously not enough, but that is often all that is allowed on the ice.

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05-25-2009, 10:54 AM
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Whatever you do make sure you stretch

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05-25-2009, 11:19 AM
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TheGooooch
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Originally Posted by Crosbyfan View Post
How long and how hard should you warm up before a game? 3 minutes from getting on the ice until the puck drops is obviously not enough, but that is often all that is allowed on the ice.
Yeah, they only have like a 3 to 5 minutes pre-skate before the game. Yeah, that isn't enough. I usually skate pretty hard around stretching my wrists out with my stick, then I shoot some and then I skate along the blueline and sprint to stops.

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05-25-2009, 12:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGooooch View Post
But it is more of a feeling at the beginning of a game. Like tonight for instance, we had a short bench and everyone was gassed early on because we had to do long shifts and everything. But when the 3rd period rolled around, I had more jump in my step and was able to skate harder for longer periods of time. I usually hit a couple free skate stick and pucks in the week and a roller pickup (3 hours). Maybe I just need to do more during the day. Sunday is my homework/study day and at night I play hockey. Perhaps it is the fact that I am not that active throughout the day that it is having this effect (or affect, I hate that one).
Well that is interesting ... I really am not sure what could prepare you for the first parts of a game if your stamina as you claim is fine for longevity in a game.

Your muscles rely heavily on potassium for the porevention of lactic acid buildup which causes muscle fatigue in exercise. It is common for all sports people to eat or drink orange juice or eat other potassium rich foods before a game and during a game.

You just may not have enough potassium going as a game starts.

I'm no doctor and do not claim to be one. Do you see a doctor regularly? Maybe you have high blood sugar and this a symptom of an underlying disease like mild Diabetes?

I had issues and found out I was suffering from Anemia and was almost hospitalized for it. My body was very low on red blood cells and I suffered a lack of oxygen in the blood as a result and was getting winded and rubbery legs.

I did find a helpful article on the matter of muscles, not sure if it applies to your symptoms or not.

The article is legit and comes the Scientific American http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...id-buil&page=2

While you are not complaining about muscle soreness the rubbery legs feeling is from the sudden onset of exercise and then you seem to recover and have jump later on as you described. Sounds like a potassium issue or pregame meal issue more than anything. I ate a meat lovers pizza before playing a few weeks ago and i played like ass, had no legs and had a terrible session.

My pregame meal these days consists of a big bowl of cornflakes with plenty of milk (high in potassium) and it works great for me. I'm fresh from the get go and have stamina and legs for 3 hours or so and I am 40 years old.

------------------------

Stephen M. Roth, a professor in the department of kinesiology at the University of Maryland, explains.

As our bodies perform strenuous exercise, we begin to breathe faster as we attempt to shuttle more oxygen to our working muscles. The body prefers to generate most of its energy using aerobic methods, meaning with oxygen. Some circumstances, however, --such as evading the historical Sabre tooth tiger or lifting heavy weights--require energy production faster than our bodies can adequately deliver oxygen. In those cases, the working muscles generate energy anaerobically. This energy comes from glucose through a process called glycolysis, in which glucose is broken down or metabolized into a substance called pyruvate through a series of steps. When the body has plenty of oxygen, pyruvate is shuttled to an aerobic pathway to be further broken down for more energy. But when oxygen is limited, the body temporarily converts pyruvate into a substance called lactate, which allows glucose breakdown--and thus energy production--to continue. The working muscle cells can continue this type of anaerobic energy production at high rates for one to three minutes, during which time lactate can accumulate to high levels.

A side effect of high lactate levels is an increase in the acidity of the muscle cells, along with disruptions of other metabolites. The same metabolic pathways that permit the breakdown of glucose to energy perform poorly in this acidic environment. On the surface, it seems counterproductive that a working muscle would produce something that would slow its capacity for more work. In reality, this is a natural defense mechanism for the body; it prevents permanent damage during extreme exertion by slowing the key systems needed to maintain muscle contraction. Once the body slows down, oxygen becomes available and lactate reverts back to pyruvate, allowing continued aerobic metabolism and energy for the body�s recovery from the strenuous event.

Contrary to popular opinion, lactate or, as it is often called, lactic acid buildup is not responsible for the muscle soreness felt in the days following strenuous exercise. Rather, the production of lactate and other metabolites during extreme exertion results in the burning sensation often felt in active muscles, though which exact metabolites are involved remains unclear. This often painful sensation also gets us to stop overworking the body, thus forcing a recovery period in which the body clears the lactate and other metabolites.

Researchers who have examined lactate levels right after exercise found little correlation with the level of muscle soreness felt a few days later. This delayed-onset muscle soreness, or DOMS as it is called by exercise physiologists, is characterized by sometimes severe muscle tenderness as well as loss of strength and range of motion, usually reaching a peak 24 to 72 hours after the extreme exercise event.

Though the precise cause of DOMS is still unknown, most research points to actual muscle cell damage and an elevated release of various metabolites into the tissue surrounding the muscle cells. These responses to extreme exercise result in an inflammatory-repair response, leading to swelling and soreness that peaks a day or two after the event and resolves a few days later, depending on the severity of the damage. In fact, the type of muscle contraction appears to be a key factor in the development of DOMS. When a muscle lengthens against a load--imagine your flexed arms attempting to catch a thousand pound weight--the muscle contraction is said to be eccentric. In other words, the muscle is actively contracting, attempting to shorten its length, but it is failing. These eccentric contractions have been shown to result in more muscle cell damage than is seen with typical concentric contractions, in which a muscle successfully shortens during contraction against a load. Thus, exercises that involve many eccentric contractions, such as downhill running, will result in the most severe DOMS, even without any noticeable burning sensations in the muscles during the event.

Given that delayed-onset muscle soreness in response to extreme exercise is so common, exercise physiologists are actively researching the potential role for anti-inflammatory drugs and other supplements in the prevention and treatment of such muscle soreness, but no conclusive recommendations are currently available. Although anti-inflammatory drugs do appear to reduce the muscle soreness--a good thing--they may slow the ability of the muscle to repair the damage, which may have negative consequences for muscle function in the weeks following the strenuous event.


Last edited by Hockeyfan68: 05-25-2009 at 12:50 PM.
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Old
05-25-2009, 07:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Escapades View Post
Whatever you do make sure you stretch
the crazy thing is, medical pros will tell you that when you stretch, you're telling your body that you're done. if you use that 3-5 minute warm up to graduate from a light skate into sprints, with some stick handling and shooting, then save the focused stretching for AFTER the game, you'll see a faster recovery post-game and more limberness during.

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05-25-2009, 11:44 PM
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All I can contribute is that I tend to get stronger as games go on. I'm usually at my best in the 3rd period, and I'm better when the bench is shorter.

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05-26-2009, 02:00 AM
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TheGooooch
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Originally Posted by Devil Dancer View Post
All I can contribute is that I tend to get stronger as games go on. I'm usually at my best in the 3rd period, and I'm better when the bench is shorter.
Well good to see that I am not alone here. Maybe I just need to find a way to get that 3rd period mentality quicker. Perhaps my mind just isn't in game form when the puck drops

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05-28-2009, 12:41 AM
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Make sure to take some time to get yourself mentally into the game too. It's a huge part a lot of people ignore, when you're mentally ready your body responds better.

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05-28-2009, 03:26 AM
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"Jello legs" could have something to do with what youre having as a meal on game days.

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05-28-2009, 09:28 AM
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Originally Posted by qwertysac View Post
"Jello legs" could have something to do with what youre having as a meal on game days.
Yep ... Bill Cosby's plot to ruin the hockey world Don't eat Jell-O on gamedays, no puddin' pops ... nuthin'!

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05-28-2009, 12:04 PM
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TheGooooch
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Originally Posted by ClericMercenaryAgent View Post
Make sure to take some time to get yourself mentally into the game too. It's a huge part a lot of people ignore, when you're mentally ready your body responds better.
any tips on that? I have tried listening to heavier music etc....

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05-28-2009, 01:27 PM
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Originally Posted by TheGooooch View Post
any tips on that? I have tried listening to heavier music etc....
I get there early like maybe a half hour too early. I walk around and look at the ice or whatever. Check out who is playing before us or whatever.

Music on the drive there is something I do too, I think most people do from what I have read around here. Mainly though I like to get my mind in the zone which usually invloves being by myself for a little bit before going into the lockeroom with the guys.

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05-29-2009, 04:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGooooch View Post
any tips on that? I have tried listening to heavier music etc....
Try visualizing yourself playing the game, just skating hard, scoring goals, making smart plays. I usually do this in my own quiet spot, just sit and synch up my brain and my body, then I listen to the music and what not.

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05-29-2009, 05:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClericMercenaryAgent View Post
Try visualizing yourself playing the game, just skating hard, scoring goals, making smart plays. I usually do this in my own quiet spot, just sit and synch up my brain and my body, then I listen to the music and what not.
Same here.

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05-30-2009, 11:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheGooooch View Post
So last weekend I played a roller hockey game at 9 and an ice game at 10:30 (both at night). I figured I would be dead tired after playing the roller game but it was quite the opposite. I had a ton of jump and didn't suffer from jello legs. Tonight I only had an ice game so I ran a mile about an hour before the game in an attempt to get my legs going, but it didn't seem to help that much.

Basically, any tips for warming up to prevent jello legs? I am probably going to get a bike or something since running just sucks IMO. Or should I just start working my legs out more?
Here you go...do this before your game.

Drill#1: (Basic position for each drill)
Place your feet, one foot apart and then get into the sitting position with your bottom touching the back of your heels. What it going to look like is a down hill skier, but in the sitting position. Make sure that your knees are apart and your hand together with your arms in between your knees. This is called the set position!

Now, for Drill #1: You want to jump forward about three feet and land back into the set position. Do this about 15 to 20 feet.

Drill #2: Same thing...but backwards.

Drill #3: Set position. Three Jumps forward, turn clock wise in the air to backwards and back down in the set position. Three jumps backwards, turn clock wise in the air to forward, back down in the set position. 15 to 20 down the runway.

Drill #4: Same as 3, but single it up! One foreward, one backwards, all the way down to the 20 ft mark.

Drill #5: Set position on the right side of you 20 ft runway. Jump with both feet, 1 ft. foward and to the left by three ft. back down into the set position. Then, jump back to the right, 1 ft. forward and to the right by 3 ft, all the way down the 20 ft runway. So what you are looking like is just jumping from side to side down the runway. Oh by the way. Remembers to land in the set position each time...don't cheat!

Drill #6: Same as drill #5, but backwards!

Drill #7: Same as drill #5, but with one leg to the left and one leg to the right. I call this the "Russian Step" but with no russian box. Just side to side down the runway. Ah but there's a catch, when you jump from side to side, you have to sit down on that back leg and don't let it touch the ground. Oh, and watch your balance. Don't use your hand for balance!

Drill #8: Yep, you are right! Same as drill #7 but backward!

Drill #9: Set position, jump forward by a couple of feet, 360 in the air, land back in the set position.

Drill # 10: Set position. Standing up! Then, down into the sitting position and back up halfway, hold for one second and back down into the sitting position. Do 10 reps of 5 sets to start off with and them increase a set each week to 10 sets.
Yep, you are right, there's a catch again! When you are standing up, place your tennis shoes on their side. Like you are skating on the out side edge on both skates. make sure that your tennis shoes stay like that when you go down into the sitted position.

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Old
06-01-2009, 11:57 PM
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beer seems to work well. alot of beer.

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06-02-2009, 09:03 AM
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WhipNash27
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Jello legs? I don't understand this term. My legs usually tend to feel tight in the first 5 minutes, but other than that, I have no idea what this means.

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06-02-2009, 01:08 PM
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Jello legs? I don't understand this term. My legs usually tend to feel tight in the first 5 minutes, but other than that, I have no idea what this means.
Rubbery legs from fatigue. I still say it is a stamina issue but the original poster disagrees.

Picture doing something like heavy snow shoveling and that light feeling you get in your arms while doing it and you need to rest.

I guess that was the issue. Riding a mountain bike for the first time in the spring I used to get a similar feeling to rubbery legs but after I had stamina from doing it often enough I didn't.

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