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Getting more velocity on passes and shots

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Old
06-06-2009, 09:02 AM
  #26
Devil Dancer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MistaWrista View Post
Getting a real whippy stick might help velocity on wrist shots and passing but it could ruin your snap/slap/one-timer and affect your accuracy.
Really? My slapshot got much better when I switched to a whippy stick, and my passing was unaffected.

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06-06-2009, 11:42 AM
  #27
Gunnar Stahl 30
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Originally Posted by Devil Dancer View Post
Really? My slapshot got much better when I switched to a whippy stick, and my passing was unaffected.
it depends how strong you are. if you are strong enough to flex a stiffer stick it could improve your slapshot

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06-06-2009, 12:50 PM
  #28
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I've found getting over the puck more helps. Lately I've been working on getting my arms out from my body and turning the blade way over the puck, then trying to make my shot more a vertical motion than lateral. This helps my accuracy and keeps the velocity.

Ideally, there are three things that will give you hard shots and passes:

1. Proper weight transfer, which creates a lot of energy
2. Proper stick flex, which stores the energy
3. Proper wrist snap and release, which adds additional energy and releases it into the shot

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06-06-2009, 12:51 PM
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar Stahl 30 View Post
it depends how strong you are. if you are strong enough to flex a stiffer stick it could improve your slapshot
I shoot a Grade A slapshot as I am big and strong and a stick that is too whippy gives too much to get good zip on the shot like you can with the correct flex. The stick flex should be abvout half of your body weight.

Too whippy and a big strong guy is just going to break the shaft in half. There have been instances of players preferring a rubbery shaft but they broke a lot of sticks .... like Ovechkin does. Phil Kessel also uses a whippy stick and also breaks sticks.

The "correct" stick depends on your position and type of player you are, a stay-at-home defensman would want a stiff flex to fire the puck in the zone from the redline etc. Getting a hard shot on net from the point, whacking the shinguards of an opposing player to cause him severe pain (I keed I keeed) and things like that.

A fancy type who does more dribbling and touch passing along with things like saucer passing may want a more rubbery shaft for feel purposes.

I weigh 230-235 and try to use at least a 115 flex but sometimes off the shelf these are not available as they mainly have average sticks for average sized guys on the shelves. Average being the 87 Flex for 5ft 10in guys who weigh the average 160-180lbs.

Right now I am using Bauer shafts that had extra length on them but they originally were 87 Flex versions. I cut them about an inch and half from the end which made them somewhere around a 100 Flex which still isn't enough for me.

I can feel too much give when really torqueing a good slapshot and I do not like that but I play in a nonslapshot league and the basic shooting has been okay with a flex of around 100 for me so far minus the slapshot which could use more flex for my body weight.

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Old
06-06-2009, 02:59 PM
  #30
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I would actually look at height and stick length predominantly over weight. Being taller means using a longer stick, and that means you can flex it a lot easier with the additional leverage.

I usually recommend for the absolute beginner 85 flex for about 6' tall, 100 flex for those 6'2" and taller, 75 flex for those 5'10" or shorter, and intermediate for those 5'6" and shorter.

At 5'8", I cut my 75 flex sticks 5" which ends up about 95 flex. If I used an 85 or 100 it'd be 105 to 120 flex!

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Old
06-06-2009, 08:29 PM
  #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
What flex stick are you using and how long do you have it? How long have you played?

Lots of good info is up here about shooting technique and strength, but IMO it's useless if you're using the wrong stick. Now I'm not trying to say the right stick will fix everything, but the wrong stick can certainly mess up even a really good player.

The stick needs to flex a bit when you shoot and even when you want to make a hard pass. If you aren't getting flex out of the stick, your arms and wrists will be doing all the work and the puck will weakly slide along the ice. A flexible stick allows you to store the energy created by your leg and core strength and when you follow through it releases all this energy towards the target.

Typically, your average 6' tall person with an average stick length (chin in skates) uses an 85 flex. If you're taller or like a longer stick, you can possibly use a higher flex, and if you're shorter or like a shorter stick, you should try a lower flex. Most players use a flex too stiff. I'm 5'8" and like sticks an inch below the chin, so I use 70-75 flex.

Another thing I might recommend, I just picked up the Bobby and Brett Hull DVD, and it does a PERFECT job of explaining and SHOWING the correct shooting technique. I recommend it, as you see over and over again slow motion shooting technique from all angles and explanations.

With the right technique and the right equipment, you should be able to get good power and accuracy out of your shots and passes, even without a ton of strength. Then you can build up your strength and get even better.

EDIT: I see you said you're a woman, and I hope I'm not making assumptions, but if you're on the shorter end (i.e. under 5'8") you might want to try an intermediate stick. If it's wood, make sure you can get some flex out of it before you buy it. If composite, same thing, it needs to have some bend and flex. Hell, Brett Hull was 6' 200 pounds and used a 65 flex stick!
I am 5'8" and I use an intermediate flex. It's the perfect height so I don't have to cut it at all, which is nice since I don't lose the whippiness. I just switched from a wood stick to a two-piece setup and I feel like I can flex it a lot better (even though they're the same brand and flex), so hopefully that helps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Everest View Post
I'm sure there are all kinds of fundamental tips in this thread.

I'd like to throw a few curve balls out there that maybe others aren't thinking about:

1) What kind of gloves are you using? More specifically, what is the PALM of the glove like? I try to use gloves light weight gloves with a thin (non-leather) palm. I find it helps me to grip the stick and alter my grip should I so desire. It may sound like a tedious detail...but its very important to be able to control the stick properly in your hands and you should be able to 'feel' the puck through the stick. This will provide you with gaining a more exact sense of when your release point is at its most powerful point.

2) Even when your practicing off-ice, wear the gloves.

3) Don't worry about practicing with a puck all the time. A tennis ball is a great learning prop which will hyper-accelerate your stick control.

4) Don't 'flail'. By this I mean...concentrate LESS on the SPEED of your motions and MORE on the EFFECT of each movement. When you've released the puck (or ball) you should have as much control over your stick as when you began your shot.

All too often, I see beginners finishing their shots with their stick at odd-ball angles and an out of balance body position.

5) Try different shooting angles. Shoot across your body. Shoot with just the toe of your stick, shoot away from your body...back hands...whatever you can think of...and maybe most importantly...try shooting the ball or puck while it is in motion, because standing over top of a puck that is sitting in one spot the entire time is really a complete waste of your time. Its not a realistic simulation of what you aspire to do in a real game!
Some great advice here. My gloves aren't that great and the palms are fairly thick leather - I really want new ones, but right now that just isn't in my budget (maybe I'll treat myself after the next student loan check).

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Old
06-07-2009, 12:29 PM
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DevilsFan38 View Post
I am 5'8" and I use an intermediate flex. It's the perfect height so I don't have to cut it at all, which is nice since I don't lose the whippiness. I just switched from a wood stick to a two-piece setup and I feel like I can flex it a lot better (even though they're the same brand and flex), so hopefully that helps.


Some great advice here. My gloves aren't that great and the palms are fairly thick leather - I really want new ones, but right now that just isn't in my budget (maybe I'll treat myself after the next student loan check).

Thing is....I find its usually the CHEAPEST gloves that work the best. The last 2 times I have went into the store to buy hockey gloves...I have intentionally sampled all the cheapest modeals and found what I wanted both times. I play everyday...so...the cheaper gloves DO wear out fast but with the lightweight sticks most of us use today...I really believe the lighter/thinner gloves are neccesary.

For you...as a 5' 8" girl...I think you should be shopping for a 12" glove...(maybe even in the JR section?). If your wearing SR gloves...thats part of your problem right there, I'll bet.

I also notice you've switched from a wood stick to a 2 piece composite.

Personally, I think a 2 piece composite should be reserved for EXPERT USAGE ONLY. The way this combination is balanced/weighted...it is (IMO) a very difficult feel to get accustomed to.

MOST 'players' will tell you that making the stick flex is 'very important'..but the truth is...most of these GUYS aren't even generating 25% of the 'flex' they THINK they are getting when they shoot or pass the puck.

I assure you that if a still photo was taken of most of us 'weekend warriors' or even a higher level of amatuer player(s) in mid-shot....we'd be appalled at how LITTLE the stick actually bends for us. It might FEEL like its providing shot-enhancing whip and maybe when we lean on the stick in the store there is all kinds of action happening...but the truth is...thats not what the stick is doing when we actually take it on the rink and use it.

Therefore, don't over-concentrate on burying all your body weight/energy onto the stick BEFORE you shoot. Keep your head up, look at your target, and don't compromise the COMPLETION of your shooting/passing mechanics by worrying about how much tourqe your generating at the beginning of your motion(s). Make sense?

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Old
06-07-2009, 01:39 PM
  #33
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take shots from the red line for about 20 minutes at every stick'n puck you go to.

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06-07-2009, 01:41 PM
  #34
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Originally Posted by vivianmb View Post
take shots from the red line for about 20 minutes at every stick'n puck you go to.
Not wrist shots, he'll just feel like an idiot. Long passing is a good idea though.

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Old
06-08-2009, 11:02 AM
  #35
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Flex makes a huge different. I get far less power on my shot with a stiff wood stick than I do with my whippy composites. And while I may be a D level player, I've got a C level shot.

I know what you mean in that many novice players don't really lean into their shots, but we're talking about proper form and maximizing power and you just can't do that if you have a stick that won't flex, because all your power would be coming from your arms and wrists, and that will result in a weak shot.

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06-08-2009, 11:44 AM
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Flex makes a huge different. I get far less power on my shot with a stiff wood stick than I do with my whippy composites. And while I may be a D level player, I've got a C level shot.

I know what you mean in that many novice players don't really lean into their shots, but we're talking about proper form and maximizing power and you just can't do that if you have a stick that won't flex, because all your power would be coming from your arms and wrists, and that will result in a weak shot.

I agree. I do, however, believe that exaggerated weight transfer/tourque should NOT be one the FUNDAMENTAL FOCAL POINTS for a player who is LEARNING to shoot the puck.

The agility required to gain the kind of force required to flex almost ANY hockey stick is something that should be learned AFTER several other more basic aspects of shooting.

As a players overall skating and balance increases...the ability to generate more tourque on shots will also increase.

To begin with...work on rolling the puck from the heel to the toe of the blade and curling your wrists over when you follow through. Its old school, its not flashy and frankly its often boring...but its a simple starting point that with sufficient repittition will provide tangible progress.

Binding tourque into the shot....is what you ultimatley want to be doing...but if you wan to build that into your SHOT...you need to build it into your SKATING first.

Practice picking a skate off the ice and gliding on one leg. Practice quick cross-over skating steps. Practice alternating skates off the ice...(all basic skating drills) but don't assosciate these drills with shooting. You wan to master these skills before you BEGIN to tie them into your shooting skills.

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06-08-2009, 03:49 PM
  #37
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Originally Posted by Everest View Post
I agree. I do, however, believe that exaggerated weight transfer/tourque should NOT be one the FUNDAMENTAL FOCAL POINTS for a player who is LEARNING to shoot the puck.

The agility required to gain the kind of force required to flex almost ANY hockey stick is something that should be learned AFTER several other more basic aspects of shooting.

As a players overall skating and balance increases...the ability to generate more tourque on shots will also increase.

To begin with...work on rolling the puck from the heel to the toe of the blade and curling your wrists over when you follow through. Its old school, its not flashy and frankly its often boring...but its a simple starting point that with sufficient repittition will provide tangible progress.

Binding tourque into the shot....is what you ultimatley want to be doing...but if you wan to build that into your SHOT...you need to build it into your SKATING first.

Practice picking a skate off the ice and gliding on one leg. Practice quick cross-over skating steps. Practice alternating skates off the ice...(all basic skating drills) but don't assosciate these drills with shooting. You wan to master these skills before you BEGIN to tie them into your shooting skills.
True. It will take you a while to get the weight transfer and arm technique right. Once you do that, you move into advanced technique, and that takes several years to get down. Hockey is a very slow sport, improvement wise. One big tip once you get the basics down, the main point is weight transfer, but what amplifies your power is not your arms or wrists, its your BACK. A good back bend with the lower/middle back will way improve the velocity of a pass or shot.

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06-08-2009, 05:31 PM
  #38
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Originally Posted by MistaWrista View Post
True. It will take you a while to get the weight transfer and arm technique right. Once you do that, you move into advanced technique, and that takes several years to get down. Hockey is a very slow sport, improvement wise. One big tip once you get the basics down, the main point is weight transfer, but what amplifies your power is not your arms or wrists, its your BACK. A good back bend with the lower/middle back will way improve the velocity of a pass or shot.

I think its also very important to EMPHASIZE that only the LOWER back is bending or moving. Your head and shoulders should NOT be 'over top of the puck' at any time during your shooting motion.

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06-08-2009, 05:51 PM
  #39
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Everyone in this thread, thanks for all the great advice!

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06-08-2009, 06:20 PM
  #40
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Check out where Ovechkin's right hand is on the stick.

It's important to be low and your stick when you shoot(and I forget all the time).

This will help you a TON in your shooting power/velocity. It's especially evident during SLAPSHOTS(at least for me).

You just have to remember how to use your stick like a trombone reed. Slide your bottom hand in your follow-through down the shaft of the stick before you shoot. This will help tremendously.

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06-08-2009, 06:42 PM
  #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brentbreakaway23 View Post


Check out where Ovechkin's right hand is on the stick.

It's important to be low and your stick when you shoot(and I forget all the time).

This will help you a TON in your shooting power/velocity. It's especially evident during SLAPSHOTS(at least for me).

You just have to remember how to use your stick like a trombone reed. Slide your bottom hand in your follow-through down the shaft of the stick before you shoot. This will help tremendously.
Great Pic.

Also note how Ovy's upper body is behind the release point of the puck and there is only a slight bend into his back.

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06-08-2009, 06:54 PM
  #42
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Originally Posted by Everest View Post
I think its also very important to EMPHASIZE that only the LOWER back is bending or moving. Your head and shoulders should NOT be 'over top of the puck' at any time during your shooting motion.
Yup, good catch. I forgot to mention but the head should stay totally still.

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06-08-2009, 06:55 PM
  #43
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Great Pic.

Also note how Ovy's upper body is behind the release point of the puck and there is only a slight bend into his back.
Right, when you are FINISHING the motion, you should return your back to being almost totally upright. You want your lower back bent when you begin the motion, but at the end, it should be almost straight again.

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06-08-2009, 08:58 PM
  #44
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Originally Posted by MistaWrista View Post
Not wrist shots, he'll just feel like an idiot. Long passing is a good idea though.
why not? i wrist the puck from my own slot to the opposite net at our neighborhood outdoor rink or during stick and puck all the time. try to hit the top half of the net. if you keep the snow off your blade, you'll be surprised how strong and accurate you can shoot with practice.

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06-08-2009, 09:09 PM
  #45
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Originally Posted by vivianmb View Post
why not? i wrist the puck from my own slot to the opposite net at our neighborhood outdoor rink or during stick and puck all the time. try to hit the top half of the net. if you keep the snow off your blade, you'll be surprised how strong and accurate you can shoot with practice.
I'm not accurate with my wrister past 40 feet, and don't see any point in practicing since it's not going to happen in game. Slapshots though

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06-08-2009, 09:52 PM
  #46
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Im about 5'3 and 130, will an intermediate (65 flex) be too long of a stick, and if I cut it down, would the flex be too much?

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06-08-2009, 10:03 PM
  #47
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Originally Posted by 24godard View Post
Im about 5'3 and 130, will an intermediate (65 flex) be too long of a stick, and if I cut it down, would the flex be too much?
Probably not but it depends on the brand. Figuring you cut an intermediate down 1-2 inches, it should be around 70-75 flex. Probably will be fine.

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06-09-2009, 05:33 AM
  #48
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Originally Posted by MistaWrista View Post
I'm not accurate with my wrister past 40 feet, and don't see any point in practicing since it's not going to happen in game. Slapshots though
you've never been in trouble in your own end ? well instead of icing it, put it on net!

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06-09-2009, 01:24 PM
  #49
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you've never been in trouble in your own end ? well instead of icing it, put it on net!
I think you might be onto something

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06-09-2009, 03:27 PM
  #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Everest View Post
I agree. I do, however, believe that exaggerated weight transfer/tourque should NOT be one the FUNDAMENTAL FOCAL POINTS for a player who is LEARNING to shoot the puck.

The agility required to gain the kind of force required to flex almost ANY hockey stick is something that should be learned AFTER several other more basic aspects of shooting.

As a players overall skating and balance increases...the ability to generate more tourque on shots will also increase.

To begin with...work on rolling the puck from the heel to the toe of the blade and curling your wrists over when you follow through. Its old school, its not flashy and frankly its often boring...but its a simple starting point that with sufficient repittition will provide tangible progress.

Binding tourque into the shot....is what you ultimatley want to be doing...but if you wan to build that into your SHOT...you need to build it into your SKATING first.

Practice picking a skate off the ice and gliding on one leg. Practice quick cross-over skating steps. Practice alternating skates off the ice...(all basic skating drills) but don't assosciate these drills with shooting. You wan to master these skills before you BEGIN to tie them into your shooting skills.

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