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Old
06-11-2009, 04:03 PM
  #26
SERE 24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XxLidstromxX View Post
so back to the topic, what curve would you recommend for my problem then? Should I go with a lidstrom or something else? I kno a low slap shot is great, but sometimes i get that free shot opening on the powerplay or on a 1 timer, and if my slapper can't go top shelf there is really no point in me shooting...
If you have the shot on the PP or a one-timer, shoot. Going top shelf is not a requisite for being allowed to shoot or for scoring. If you are one-timing the puck top shelf from the blue line you are still likely to miss the net. There really is no pressing need to be able to roof a slapshot from the point. Trying will only result in a low shooting percentage. If you really insist on having a curve that gives you better elevation, try the Lidstrom or, if you can find it, the old Drury (or current equivalent). I was able to take slappers from center ice and ring crossbar (or miss high) with the Drury curve. I didn't like getting that kind of lift though so I didn't use it for very long.

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06-11-2009, 04:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XxLidstromxX View Post
so back to the topic, what curve would you recommend for my problem then? Should I go with a lidstrom or something else? I kno a low slap shot is great, but sometimes i get that free shot opening on the powerplay or on a 1 timer, and if my slapper can't go top shelf there is really no point in me shooting...
An Iginla or a Sakic.

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06-11-2009, 05:11 PM
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XxLidstromxX View Post
so back to the topic, what curve would you recommend for my problem then? Should I go with a lidstrom or something else? I kno a low slap shot is great, but sometimes i get that free shot opening on the powerplay or on a 1 timer, and if my slapper can't go top shelf there is really no point in me shooting...
Respectfully we were on topic ... your shooting mechanics are the problem and not the blade.

There isn't a blade out there that will help you to shoot a slapshot high for a "roof job" which is what i was pointing out. It really truly and honestly is done with your wrists and hands.

Blades will help you shoot wristshots high if they have an open face though so if you can shoot a hard wrister try that instead of the slapshot.

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06-11-2009, 05:16 PM
  #29
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Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
Respectfully we were on topic ... your shooting mechanics are the problem and not the blade.
Well, i have tried the crosby blade, and the wrist shot is horrible, and then i tried a malkin and the wrist shot was wicked... The curve does makes a difference...

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06-11-2009, 05:24 PM
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Originally Posted by XxLidstromxX View Post
Well, i have tried the crosby blade, and the wrist shot is horrible, and then i tried a malkin and the wrist shot was wicked... The curve does makes a difference...
I thought you were talking about your slapshot from the point? Isn't that what you were asking for help with originally? I'll have to scroll back and look but i could swear that was what you were asking about ... the slapshot roof job as you put it.

It does make a difference with your wristshot. There really isn't a blade to help with a slapshot for you to roof it from the point as you wanted. That is done with mechanics. That was what we were discussing on the previous page in detail.

The discussion was turning into a kennedy assassination zapbruder film sequence though and it isn't that complicated.

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06-11-2009, 06:08 PM
  #31
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no im just trying to make a point that curves do make a difference, like you don't see crosby ever shoot top shelf unless its near the blue or a backhand and he's a pro hockey player...
Hockeyfan68, what curve do you use, you seem to be the chara of these forums...

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06-11-2009, 06:15 PM
  #32
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Why don't you get a two piece stick and try a few different curves?

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06-11-2009, 06:23 PM
  #33
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two piece just isn't my thing, i dont like the feel of a two piece...

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06-11-2009, 06:27 PM
  #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XxLidstromxX View Post
no im just trying to make a point that curves do make a difference, like you don't see crosby ever shoot top shelf unless its near the blue or a backhand and he's a pro hockey player...
Hockeyfan68, what curve do you use, you seem to be the chara of these forums...
the Crosby curve you buy in a store and Crosby's actual curve are extremely different. that said try a P106 its an open toe and will help you get your shot up, but it hockeyfan is probably right in saying your mechanics could use work.

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06-11-2009, 06:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XxLidstromxX View Post
two piece just isn't my thing, i dont like the feel of a two piece...
I find with my broken one pieces if you use the shorter tapered blades the feel is pretty close. the first one piece I broke i bought the typical long blades, I used the stick one and hated it but the shorter blades are a huge improvement.

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06-11-2009, 06:29 PM
  #36
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yea, i checked my mechanics, i watched that video posted in this thread, and honestly i am doing everything right...

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06-11-2009, 07:21 PM
  #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XxLidstromxX View Post
two piece just isn't my thing, i dont like the feel of a two piece...

You do realize that almost every one piece stick is just a two piece stick that is fused together, right?

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06-11-2009, 07:25 PM
  #38
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yea i kno that lol, i just find having a one piece to be much smoother in terms of shooting... Just a personal preference

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06-11-2009, 08:25 PM
  #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XxLidstromxX View Post
no im just trying to make a point that curves do make a difference, like you don't see crosby ever shoot top shelf unless its near the blue or a backhand and he's a pro hockey player...
Hockeyfan68, what curve do you use, you seem to be the chara of these forums...
Curves don't make much of a difference with slapshots and they do not help you to shoot a "roof job" as you put it. They give you more accuracy and zip for whatever shooting style you have.

I just do not get what you are getting at with the Crosby analogy. Wherever Crosby is shooting is his choice, he can do a "roof job" from anywhere on the ice if he wants to. That was my point, he changes how he shoots it with his mechanics. I'll say it again .... it has NOTHING to do with his curve he is using with respects to a slapshot.

You say your mechanics are sound so you should be all set then, change your followthrough from low to high by angling your blade open in the followthrough like Graves said in the video I posted. Your followthrough should follow your line of sight for what you are aiming at he said. In fact watch Robitaille's followthrough since he just about does a "roof job".

That is simply all you need to do.

Are you going to ask everyone to stop playing while you change blades during play because a "roof job" is called for?

As for what I use for a blade ... again it doesn't have anything to do with the ability to roof a slapshot high under the crossbar.

I use a P88 (Lindros), Recchi, Iginla or an Easton Heatley which vary from a 1/2" to 3/4" curve depth. They are all almost the same which is about a curve in the middle of the blade and NOT open at the toe (there are LIE variations between these available though). The toe is closed ... I hate an open toe even just a little bit.

I dislike heel curves too, I have a PM9 blade and I dislike it because it has a kind of mid heel curve and then the rest of the blade is kinda straight. really good for backhanders and backhand passing and good for roofing a wristshot.

Even with the PM9 I dislike I can easily shoot a slapshot and put it where I want to. High ... low ... wherever. Because like I said, you can do a "roof job" slapshot with any kind of blade because the blade doesn't do it ... YOU do it with your wrists and followthrough.

I could do a "roof job" with a perfectly straight blade with ZERO curve or angle.

Do you remember an AHL/NHL player named Petr Prajsler? he had NO curve and NO face open. it was straight like the 1950s blades and he had a nice slapshot from the point, he played D for the Providence/Boston Bruins and also for the Kings. he did the same things as players with curves because his hands did it and wrists.

I mean seriously it is just the way it is. I crack up often because others on the ice notice my slapshot and they always ask what I am using to be able to shoot like that. What I use seriously has nothing to do with it ... you can't buy a stick with an NHL player's name on it and expect it to shoot pucks better than you did before. I mean that is just crazy.

It is an old analogy but the "it isn't the tools that make the carpenter, the carpenter makes the carpenter" is true.

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06-11-2009, 09:50 PM
  #40
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okay so i just hit up the ice for about 2 hours just shooting pucks with my buddies. They all have different curves on there sticks, and some of them have open faces. 1 of them had my old malkin curve, so I tried the low - high follow through, and honestly it was a little better, but getting the top shelf shot was like 1 in 10... So i'm looking into a Gagne or Lidstrom type curve now... Btw im not an all star player, im only 16 and my job is mainly getting the hits, prevent goals and score goals, my wrist shots are really nice, its just the slapper that ****s me up... What kind of training would you recommend towards building strong wrists which could possibly lead to higher slap shots?

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06-11-2009, 10:43 PM
  #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XxLidstromxX View Post
okay so i just hit up the ice for about 2 hours just shooting pucks with my buddies. They all have different curves on there sticks, and some of them have open faces. 1 of them had my old malkin curve, so I tried the low - high follow through, and honestly it was a little better, but getting the top shelf shot was like 1 in 10... So i'm looking into a Gagne or Lidstrom type curve now... Btw im not an all star player, im only 16 and my job is mainly getting the hits, prevent goals and score goals, my wrist shots are really nice, its just the slapper that ****s me up... What kind of training would you recommend towards building strong wrists which could possibly lead to higher slap shots?
Firstly I am a bit of a windbag and apologize ... I am just passionate about things

Hmmm you remind me of the center on my line ... he is 18 years old and a damned good player. he beats several guys all the time and makes great plays but he can't shoot a puck to save his life. His slapshots are weak ones and often dip while he shoots it. He is a small guy and is just a little weak is all in the wrists and arms also he poor mechanics which leaves him not using his leg drive like he should. He has improved lately as we play shinny together every friday (when my bicep isn't torn and i can't play for another 4 months or more *sigh*) we worked on it quite a bit. I worked on his mechanics and using his legs to drive the puck instead of trying to muscle it since he has no muscles in his arms to use.

I should start off by saying I am no expert on playing hockey. I am not the strongest with stick handling to the point of making others look stupid. I am not a fancy fiddle diddle guy. that is okay with me I have hockey smarts and make up for that with smart plays and a great shot. I am not the best player on the ice when our team plays.

I kill penalties and am a checking forward with a heavy shot ... I would probably be a fighter type guy who hits hard and plays with grit. That is okay too .... hockey has room for everyone.

This being said shooting is the only thing I do as well as a pro player period. My friends or brothers have often told me I shoot harder than some pro AHL or NHL players we watch during games or warmups in person when we are down by the glass level watching them.

I can't really tell when I am shooting because I am the one shooting if you know what I mean. I have had University of Maine players tell me they wished they could shoot like I do. That would be Scott Pellerin and Jean Yves Roy from a long time ago. Some semi-pro and pro guys (one guy was a fighter for the St. John's Mapleleafs) rented the ice and I played with them ... while I am average at most other things I am not at shooting pucks. I got great compliments from good players over the years.

I see everyday guys looking at what I am using when playing shinny hockey and it gets kind of funny sometimes because it really doesn't matter. I do not buy top of the line hockey stick shafts or blades. I buy whatever is available usually though I am a bit more fussy to get my curve I like.

The curve I use has not much to do with slapshots but more to do with playing both wings, I need a mild curve for backhand passing purposes and I do not like an open face because of how I shoot wristshots and I want to have the toe flat for a backhand shot on the off wing. I compromise and use a blade pattern that is more or less universal in strengths for different uses. Killing penalties I need a straighter type blade for backhand clears or blocking shots and stealing passes.

I have enough curve for half decent wristshots yet a mild blade face curve for things like redirecting passes or touch passing. I love give and go passing with a team mate.

I have never bought a curve because of a name on it ever because honestly the curve with their name on it is not even the curve they really use. it is just a name on it for a selling point because obviously they sell more when a pro player's name is on it. besides that most other people do not even use a curve I would want to use and i do not care if they are a pro or not.

I used to use wood and curved them myself removing the curve that was pre-shaped at the factory. I would heat it up over a stove burner and wedge it in a door crack where the hinges are and bend them to my liking. Often I would lay it on the floor blade face down and take most of the curve out of it so it was a straighter blade by standing on the backside of the blade while it was hot.

Anyway to answer your question about strengthening your arms I really do not know because it has never been an issue with me. I am sure it will be soon enough when I start using my torn bicep again because I will need to strengthen it before being able to play again to prevent more injury.

I used to shoot pucks off of a junky kitchen table top that had a formica surface. I took the legs off and just had it in the backyard lying on the ground. It was great practice for shooting pucks.

You also do not even need real pucks as a tennis ball will do you well too which you can shoot anywhere. In fact it may help you to practice rising the slapshots by experimenting with your followthroughs.


Last edited by Hockeyfan68: 06-12-2009 at 12:03 AM.
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06-11-2009, 11:00 PM
  #42
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Yea, we kind of did get off on the wrong foot... back to the topic, i think its more my technique then my arms lol, i can curl 70's lol which is decently good. Don't get me wrong but i have a lot of upper body and lower body muscle, i just don't kno how to use it.
I have tried with the follow through and honestly it just doesn't flow within me, i'll do it a couple times and i'll go back to my regular shot...

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06-12-2009, 12:02 AM
  #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XxLidstromxX View Post
Yea, we kind of did get off on the wrong foot... back to the topic, i think its more my technique then my arms lol, i can curl 70's lol which is decently good. Don't get me wrong but i have a lot of upper body and lower body muscle, i just don't kno how to use it.
I have tried with the follow through and honestly it just doesn't flow within me, i'll do it a couple times and i'll go back to my regular shot...
Well that is pretty good then with the muscle stuff ... I don't know really about the shot thing other than just practicing shooting. Weight transfer like in the video I posted on the previous page should help you. they did a good job showing how to shoot the puck and you say you can shoot the puck good enough already so just practice the followthrough.

If you want it low curl the blade downward as you are following through with a flick of the wrist like you would shoot a wrist shot. Don't go for the big back scratching slapshot until you have mastered the easier shots like snap shots or wrist shots.

If you want it high don't curl the blade downward and instead aim the shot at what you are trying to hit by controlling the flick of the wrist while following through.

it is hard to explian it here typing. I wish i could show you personally on the ice ... most people get it quickly watching while standing next to someone showing them.

make friends with someone who can shoot and ask them to show you I guess.

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06-12-2009, 03:35 AM
  #44
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There are two or three easy tricks for getting the slap shot up. 1) Shoot specifically off the curve (exactly). This works every time and helps me with the PM9 if I'm in close. 2) Keep your blade more open on the follow through 3) Keep the follow through higher. Oh, and also bending the back and knees more, as well as lowering the hands do the same thing.

But beware that a higher slapper will lose a little velocity and is almost always easier to stop for the goalie in a real game.

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06-12-2009, 09:44 AM
  #45
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haha not if you have Franzen or Holmstrom in front lol

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06-12-2009, 10:31 AM
  #46
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Here's what I got:

First, like everyone else said, if you're playing D you don't want those slappers to get above the knees of the goalie. If you're at the point and shoot higher than his knees, you're just going to bounce the puck off either a teammate who will be ticked off to get a headhunter, or if it goes through the goalie will probably have had plenty of time and space to see a puck come at him at glove height. Few goalies are going to be laying down in their net when the puck is at the blue line.

Second, if you want to get the shot up higher, have the puck closer to your front leg in your shooting stance. As your stick comes across your body and passes the midpoint, it starts rotating upward. Keeping the puck towards your front foot means the blade is traveling forward and up instead of just forward, and that sends the puck in the air. Most people recommend shooting from the middle of the blade for slappers, although I think it depends on the curve.

Third, I'm a fan of the P88 because it's got a gradual curve throughout the blade, which means it's predictable for me. The face isn't as open so my shots stay low when they need to, but I can still up the puck, get lots of spin on it, and send it up high if need be. I'm a forward who moved back to defense recently, and my shots from the point are all six inches or so off the ice, and for the most part they reach the net at a good speed.

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06-12-2009, 10:49 AM
  #47
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Originally Posted by XxLidstromxX View Post
haha not if you have Franzen or Holmstrom in front lol
What are Franzen and Holmstrom going to do with a shot that you shoot at their chest height? Not deflect it, that's for sure. Shooting for the top shelf is generally the sign of a d-man who cares more about looking like a stud who can wire it than making the right play. Keep the puck ~2 feet or lower off the ice. I understand wanting the ability to hit the top shelf with a slapper, but there is no need for it. Occasionally, you might get the opportunity to try it, but unless you're joining the rush and in closer than you usually get, there are few situations when a defenseman is shooting top shelf. I've played defense in college for 4 years; I am coached in practice to keep my shot down. I get yelled at when I lose the handle and send one high, even just in practice, accidentally. I can roof a slapshot (and it's good to be able to), but I don't understand feeling you need to be able to. You don't. You can be 100% effective and a threat from the blueline without ever getting the puck more than 15 inches or so off the ice.

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06-12-2009, 01:04 PM
  #48
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Yep everyone has this right .... the shot should more often than not be at the knees or lower. This way a teamate can deflect it easier or it may just deflect off of three legs and go in and more importantly the rebound garbage goal.

Most hockey levels except for the NHL and even then .... the goalies cannot control their rebounds from a very hard shot very well.

You can also achieve the same thing with a hard wristshot or a snapshot.

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06-12-2009, 03:38 PM
  #49
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Well ill look around and ask other people also

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06-12-2009, 03:44 PM
  #50
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Originally Posted by XxLidstromxX View Post
Yea, we kind of did get off on the wrong foot... back to the topic, i think its more my technique then my arms lol, i can curl 70's lol which is decently good. Don't get me wrong but i have a lot of upper body and lower body muscle, i just don't kno how to use it.
I have tried with the follow through and honestly it just doesn't flow within me, i'll do it a couple times and i'll go back to my regular shot...
Slapshots are very much about rhythm and timing. You have to synchronize the weight transfer with the upper body motion. The slapshot itself is the most simple, natural of shots, but can take a long time to get good at. Muscle has almost NOTHING to do with it. I've played shinny with a kid who's the best player on his travel team, (will probably be moving to play juniors soon) who's 14 or 15, maybe 130 lbs soaking wet, and he BOMBS slappers off left and right. I outweigh him by 50 lbs and outmuscle him easily, and he's got 15 mph on me. Think about it, Rolston is approx 180, and can nearly break 100 on his shots, but I can name several defenseman over 220 lbs who can't break 85-90.

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