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Conditioning for hockey

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Old
06-13-2009, 02:30 AM
  #1
Pierre Gotye
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Conditioning for hockey

What are good drills for working out?

I play center and I seem to run out of gas when I am rushing it back into the offensive zone. I need some recommendations on endurance training....something for short bursts of energy after skating around.

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06-13-2009, 02:53 AM
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I hear HIIT (high intensity interval training) is preferred method for hockey from people nowadays.

Its basically: rest -high intense sprint for 30s- rest for 10 - and repeat

There are many variations (such as walk, sprint, walk) at different speeds so I guess its up to preference. Things such as the Tabita method might work too.

I honestly don't know how it helps IMO since I have not gotten off my lazy ass to give it a shot. Maybe tomorrow I will try

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06-13-2009, 04:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Persuasion View Post
I hear HIIT (high intensity interval training) is preferred method for hockey from people nowadays.

Its basically: rest -high intense sprint for 30s- rest for 10 - and repeat

There are many variations (such as walk, sprint, walk) at different speeds so I guess its up to preference. Things such as the Tabita method might work too.

I honestly don't know how it helps IMO since I have not gotten off my lazy ass to give it a shot. Maybe tomorrow I will try
See, I very much disagree and have heavy success with other methods. I think it matters a lot on the person/genetics, because my brother and uncle ran 10k's for fun and I used to play basketball for 4-5 hours in a row when I was younger. If you're talking specifically about longer-term conditioning within one shift, you need to do something very intense for approximately how long a sequences of shifts would last, e.g. do one shift of x, then stop for as long as you'd be on the bench for and repeat a whole period's length. That's always worked really well for me, but I think it might be different for you.

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06-13-2009, 07:20 AM
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This is an oversimplification of the issue... but think of it this way:

Anaerobic capacity = ability to perform a shift w/o getting gassed
Aerobic capacity = ability to recover quickly on the bench

As a hockey player you need both, but anaerobic capacity should be your primary focus. Many people swear by HIIT, which combines short periods of slow jogging w/ quick sprints. I personally prefer to train each individually. If I'm doing sprints I do sprints, and if I'm running long distance I run long distance. It's probably not as good as HIIT but it's more enjoyable for me that way.

If you can run 3 miles in > 25 minutes you're good enough for a lower level player. The rest of your time should be focused on sprints and suicides.

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Old
06-13-2009, 10:06 AM
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I second Tabata method. It's basically HIIT with everything optimized... the duration of work, duration of rest, number of rounds.

It was desgined by a Japanese scientist whose last name was Tabata. While working for the Unversity of Tokyo he used mice to test different durations and numbers of rounds. When he was finally set on all then umbers, he was given a few olympic athletes and put them through the Tabata method. They recorded a marked (some sites say 28%, some say 14&) VO2MAX increase (VO2MAX is some measure of oxygen intake; I think it measures anaerobic capacity, not too sure) in 6 weeks.

These were fully trained olympic athletes who had already had ridiculous stamina. Imagaine what it could do for you! I sprained my ankle but will be starting the Tabata method with burpees once i'm healed.

Anyways, for Tabata method you want to pick a full body exercise. Some people do use weights for exercises like power cleans, thrusters or front squats. There is an article somewhere on T-Nation (here) about this if you want to try, but I wouldn't reccomend unless you are really comfortable with the movement, otherwise it could be dangerous.

Good bodyweight exercise choices would be burpeers or sprints. When Tabata first did it with the olympic athletes, he used some sort of stationary bicycle, I believe, and they did bicycle sprints.

In general, you want to use something that works at least a few large muscles in your body. Doing it with curls is stupid (obviously). I'm doing burpees because they're a good time even without tabata. It's alot of movements combined into one and so it works alot of different muscles.

Once you have your exercise chosen, find a bucket in case you need to puke at some point. Tabata requires MAXIMUM EFFORT for every second you are supposed to be working.

So, a round goes like this:

20s of work (again, maximum effort)
10s of rest
Total = 30s

You do that 8 times. 8*30s = 240s
240s* (1min/60s) = 4 min.

So you will be done in just 4 minutes. It will be a hell of a four minutes, but that's something to remember while your halfway through and feel like giving up.

Obviously, you will need a clock with a second hand that you can see, or there are tabata clocks available online (one here).

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06-13-2009, 11:27 AM
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06-13-2009, 12:43 PM
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IMO, you will not benifit from running. You need to train to the specificity of hockey. Meaning you do all your sprinting and agility on the ice, while doing hockey specific lifting.

I wrote a program design for my college ice hockey team if anyone is interested

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06-13-2009, 02:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcflyy97 View Post
IMO, you will not benifit from running. You need to train to the specificity of hockey. Meaning you do all your sprinting and agility on the ice, while doing hockey specific lifting.

I wrote a program design for my college ice hockey team if anyone is interested
Ray Bourque did A LOT of running and in interviews credited it (along with an exercise bike) with his stamina.

Of course he was Ray Bourque .... I would think riding a bike indoors would be better on the joints. I doubt Ray would have run much had he had a serious knee injury playing hockey.

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06-13-2009, 03:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
Ray Bourque did A LOT of running and in interviews credited it (along with an exercise bike) with his stamina.

Of course he was Ray Bourque .... I would think riding a bike indoors would be better on the joints. I doubt Ray would have run much had he had a serious knee injury playing hockey.

I agree. I asked my doctor about running for health and he said it's not worth the risk to your joints, especially considering there are so many other things you can do that give the same benefit (swimming, biking, just hitting a heavy bag).

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcflyy97
IMO, you will not benifit from running. You need to train to the specificity of hockey. Meaning you do all your sprinting and agility on the ice, while doing hockey specific lifting.

I don't think cardio training needs to be "hockey specific." Cardio training should be straining your heart and lungs, not training your feet to be quicker or your skating muscles to be stronger. You're just trying to increase the amount of time you can skate hard, battle for the puck, etc...

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06-13-2009, 06:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gc View Post




I don't think cardio training needs to be "hockey specific." Cardio training should be straining your heart and lungs, not training your feet to be quicker or your skating muscles to be stronger. You're just trying to increase the amount of time you can skate hard, battle for the puck, etc...
I am currently doing what I can while I heal up a torn bicep and have been going to public skating. While public skating is very boring I make sure I do lap after lap endlessly without a break. The first hour has my legs pretty much used up and then they Zamboni the ice after which they switch direction for another hour. Again I go nonstop for that whole hour at a steady pace and by the time I am done feel like I played an hour of actual hockey.

I've always been very athletic and have always had great stamina. I really wish I had an exercise bike at home because I would ride that a lot.

Staying in hockey shape while you are forced to not be able to play is really proving to be really tough. Staying focused mentally to stay in shape and get lazy has been tough because public skating is extremely EXTREMELY boring.

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Old
06-13-2009, 06:53 PM
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gc View Post
I second Tabata method. It's basically HIIT with everything optimized... the duration of work, duration of rest, number of rounds.

It was desgined by a Japanese scientist whose last name was Tabata. While working for the Unversity of Tokyo he used mice to test different durations and numbers of rounds. When he was finally set on all then umbers, he was given a few olympic athletes and put them through the Tabata method. They recorded a marked (some sites say 28%, some say 14&) VO2MAX increase (VO2MAX is some measure of oxygen intake; I think it measures anaerobic capacity, not too sure) in 6 weeks.

These were fully trained olympic athletes who had already had ridiculous stamina. Imagaine what it could do for you! I sprained my ankle but will be starting the Tabata method with burpees once i'm healed.

Anyways, for Tabata method you want to pick a full body exercise. Some people do use weights for exercises like power cleans, thrusters or front squats. There is an article somewhere on T-Nation (here) about this if you want to try, but I wouldn't reccomend unless you are really comfortable with the movement, otherwise it could be dangerous.

Good bodyweight exercise choices would be burpeers or sprints. When Tabata first did it with the olympic athletes, he used some sort of stationary bicycle, I believe, and they did bicycle sprints.

In general, you want to use something that works at least a few large muscles in your body. Doing it with curls is stupid (obviously). I'm doing burpees because they're a good time even without tabata. It's alot of movements combined into one and so it works alot of different muscles.

Once you have your exercise chosen, find a bucket in case you need to puke at some point. Tabata requires MAXIMUM EFFORT for every second you are supposed to be working.

So, a round goes like this:

20s of work (again, maximum effort)
10s of rest
Total = 30s

You do that 8 times. 8*30s = 240s
240s* (1min/60s) = 4 min.

So you will be done in just 4 minutes. It will be a hell of a four minutes, but that's something to remember while your halfway through and feel like giving up.

Obviously, you will need a clock with a second hand that you can see, or there are tabata clocks available online (one here).
Wouldn't plyos be perfect for this?

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Old
06-13-2009, 11:22 PM
  #12
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Boy, I needed to see this article as I have been out of commission since my eye injury, and now I have been given clearance to play and exercise at full tilt now.

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Old
06-14-2009, 12:14 AM
  #13
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Originally Posted by MistaWrista View Post
Wouldn't plyos be perfect for this?
I'm sorry, I've read a little about the ideas behind plyometrics but I don't know too many specific exercises. If I remember correctly, throwing a ball as hard as you can against a wall is a plyometric, as is jumping, or clapping pushups. I think even sprinting is considered a plyometric, which is mentioned online as being good for tabata.

Really, I think the jump at the end of a burpee would be like a plyometric. That's one of the reasons I can't wait to start Tabata with burpees, it seems to fit hockey (and most other sports) very well. The pushup, especially if you try to do a clapping pushup, will build power in your chest and triceps somewhat, while the squat and jump will help build leg power and explosiveness. All the while you will increase your stamina as well.

I don't want to reach, I'm not an expert or even well read on this stuff. I would think that plyometrics would be good depending on the movement. The T-Nation article mentions that you need to pick something that hits a lot of muscles so as not to exhaust yourself within one or two rounds. Could you give some examples of the movements you'd want to use?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
I am currently doing what I can while I heal up a torn bicep and have been going to public skating. While public skating is very boring I make sure I do lap after lap endlessly without a break. The first hour has my legs pretty much used up and then they Zamboni the ice after which they switch direction for another hour. Again I go nonstop for that whole hour at a steady pace and by the time I am done feel like I played an hour of actual hockey.

I've always been very athletic and have always had great stamina. I really wish I had an exercise bike at home because I would ride that a lot.

Staying in hockey shape while you are forced to not be able to play is really proving to be really tough. Staying focused mentally to stay in shape and get lazy has been tough because public skating is extremely EXTREMELY boring.
That sucks man, stick with it. I've been reading the thread about your injury, last time I checked it had gotten alot better pretty fast, right?

I agree public skating is boring. I love to skate fast and it sucks not being able to let th horses go, y'know? Everytime I get ready to really move there is a small child or something in the way.

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06-14-2009, 01:01 AM
  #14
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I really wanna try the Tabata thing with thrusters but I'm worried it would wreck me for hockey the next day. How much time should you allow for recovery, 24, 48 hrs?

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06-14-2009, 01:01 AM
  #15
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There actually is a twist conditioning center by my house and I did it for a while. By the end I was very disappointed, I found that I was doing workouts harder before I did the program and I came out in worse shape then I entered with. I would recommend P90X for you because I know it helped my cardio out A LOT when I was doing it, now I just go to the gym 6 times a week for an hour a day for my workouts and if I want to do cardio specific training I run around the park by my house which is a mile long.

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06-14-2009, 01:22 AM
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Wind sprints (intervals) have worked great for me, but I honestly think that almost any reasonable method of cardio training can work for anyone. It is a mistake to pick one method and fixate on what exercise you're doing, as opposed to how they're doing it. In my opinion, cardio should suck. It should be miserable. No matter what you end up doing you should do it with a level of intensity that makes you hate it. Basically, in my experience, it isn't what you do, but how you do it. Make it suck.

I run 5 kilometes in about 22:45 (kind of slow, but I have the exact opposite of a runners build). What I did for a few months was run 60 seconds at my 5k race pace, the sprint for thirty seconds. When I started that I used to make it about a mile and a quarter before I threw up. After a while it got to the point where I would have muscle failure before truly running out of breath in pretty much any exercise I did.

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Old
06-14-2009, 09:51 AM
  #17
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Originally Posted by MistaWrista View Post
I really wanna try the Tabata thing with thrusters but I'm worried it would wreck me for hockey the next day. How much time should you allow for recovery, 24, 48 hrs?
I've been looking around for you but all I see our people talking about how they feel immediately after, never how long it took to recover.

I would leave 48hrs the first time, just in case, then adjust after experiencing the workout. I can't see it taking that long for you to recover though, unless you are out of shape.

I presume you read the T-Nation article and so you know to go light?

Also, I found this on another forum and it emphazises the amount of effort you need to put in. This brings up one other thing, most people count how many reps they manage to do per interval. The lowest number of reps is your score for the day. Good luck with your training and please share how it goes!

Quote:
Tabata Squat Thrusts

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I had tried my first Tabata workout with squat thrusts the other noght, and it wa s darned easy ... not what I expected. I managrd 8 squat thrusts per 20 second interval, and I was barely winded by the end of the four minutes. This meant:

A. I'M IN PHENOMENAL SHAPE!!! (Hardly!)
B. I was working too slow.
C. I needed to add weight.
D. Squat thrusts are an inferior exercise for Tabata workouts.

Tonight, I tested theory B. I managed ten squat thrusts per exercise, even eleven during one interval. Well, I wanted to vomit when I was done. Pouring sweat, and sucking wind... This is the glory of Tabata about which I have heard!

So now, I think I'll do this workout twice per week! In terms of my theories above, C.) adding weight doesn't seem practicle or safe, and D.) squat thrusts are a good exercise, utilizing the legs, arms, and core.

As far as theory A is concerned, well, I'm getting there!!!:

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06-14-2009, 10:58 AM
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I'm not a conditioning expert, in fact I'm really not very active outside of work anymore. But speaking from past experience, I got into cross country/moutain biking one summer and was doing some longish rides, 10-30km....the next fall when I got on the ice I had jump and could play long shifts with ease. Actually getting out there and riding is so much better than an exercise bike, going up hills will challenge you, and going down them is fun. Something like that work/rest ideal others were discussing, the exercise bike won't give you variance, or a thrill.

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06-14-2009, 08:21 PM
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I'm not a conditioning expert, in fact I'm really not very active outside of work anymore. But speaking from past experience, I got into cross country/moutain biking one summer and was doing some longish rides, 10-30km....the next fall when I got on the ice I had jump and could play long shifts with ease. Actually getting out there and riding is so much better than an exercise bike, going up hills will challenge you, and going down them is fun. Something like that work/rest ideal others were discussing, the exercise bike won't give you variance, or a thrill.
I should blow the cobwebs off mine in the garage and hit the road.

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06-14-2009, 08:32 PM
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don't forget about the jump rope.

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