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NHL Draft - Prospects Discuss hockey prospects from all over the world and the NHL Draft.

How does a team typically "develop" a prospect?

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Old
07-04-2009, 11:14 AM
  #1
AK
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How does a team typically "develop" a prospect?

I see the term thrown around on these boards an awful lot, particularly with teams like the Red Wings that have a lot of mid-round picks, diamonds in the rough and such like Zetterberg, Datsyuk and Franzen who they "developed" so well to get to prominence in the NHL.

My question is this-- How exactly does an NHL team develop a young player into a solid NHLer? Is it just by easing him through the ranks and not overwhelming him, or is there more to it, like good instruction and handling?

Thanks.

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07-04-2009, 11:17 AM
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Holland breastfeeds them.

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07-04-2009, 11:26 AM
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The Expert
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I think usually, prospects are advanced slowly through the ranks, but contacted by the organization regularly. I know many Sens prospects have said the organization contacted them, or Murray watched them play quite a few times during the season. That way they can get regular updates, and know what to tell the player to improve on during the offseason.

Development camps are pretty good for this too. You can compare prospects, and see improvements made over the past year.

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07-04-2009, 01:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glassjaw View Post
Holland breastfeeds them.
Oh my god I about died when I read that.

Development varies because its not like all players come cut from the same mold to get worked on. For example:

Stamkos struggled a lot early in the year, and he admitted his confidence took a shot because all he has ever known was winning. He wasn't used to being beat up on, he wasn't used to playing on a really poor team. His development, of course, would probably start with handling poor situations as a professional and learning how to take the reigns and inspire a team, because most of his talent is already there.

Then again, you may find a guy with a lot of heart, a guy that'll bleed on every shift, but you find yourself having to teach him to focus, calm down, and not let his emotions get the best of him - example: Steve Downie.

Its all relative to the players shortcomings and what role you want him to fill, in short.

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07-04-2009, 01:28 PM
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Poach developed players from overseas leagues.

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07-04-2009, 01:37 PM
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Depends on player to player really, using some examples that i know well.

Sam Gagner was able to jump into the NHL at 18 and though he might have been rushed this was probably the best place for him evident by his 50 point season as a rookie.

Cogliano on the other hand was allowed to mature in college for 2 years i belive before he saw NHL ice, also good for him as his first season was just shy of 50 points.

Still other players have success by allowing them time in Pro european leagues to mature and understand the pro game.

Asking how a team develops prospects is a very, very big question as different styles of play, physical maturity, mental maturity, skill level, skating ability, Ect. all play a role in deciding where a prospect will play and for how long.

Overall i think an easing into the NHL is the best for most (~95%) of players. Allowing them time to mature in junior/european DIV 2 leagues. Then them moving into the AHL/European pro leagues to learn the speed/stlye of the pro game. Then eventually allowing them some time in the nhl with a mix of AHL time and eventually moving them up through the ranks in the NHL spectrum. Detroit is a perfect example of this.

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07-04-2009, 01:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Bobsled Gainey View Post
Its all relative to the players shortcomings and what role you want him to fill, in short.
Yup, having them play in a league that'll help and get the coaching to fix their short comings.

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07-05-2009, 05:28 AM
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Let them dominate at every level before hand, ease them into the next level each time. Start on 3rd line NHL and work wway up???

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07-05-2009, 08:12 AM
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solo16
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Originally Posted by init2winit View Post
I don't remember when, but recently Holland was on NHL live and they asked him about this and I believe he said the main thing was to take your time with the players so that they never lose confidence. He seemed to think confidence was a huge factor in prospects being able to actually fulfill their true potential.

Pretty much saying you overcook them in the minors so that when they come to the NHL they don't lose any confidence in their capabilities or skills if they make a mistake. It makes sense because I think confidence is one of the main factors that separates individual players and you can see how bad some of the great NHL players are when they have lost a little confidence. From my own team's experience, this is what made all the difference in Mike Green's game.

Plus, I also remember Babcock saying that when you have really good prospects and just throw them in the NHL, they tend to stick to just doing what they are good at. Therefore, they never learn to do all the little things that are so important and that make players so well-rounded. I think this is probably the biggest thing that has helped Detroit. Their offensively gifted players aren't thrown into the NHL where they will just worry about scoring points, but instead learn all aspects of the game at a lower level and then come into the NHL with the whole package. Almost all of their prospects learn and perfect the little details enough to allow them to stick in the NHL and then once they are there and realize they can hang (probably by not losing confidence because they are given a small role that they can handle at first) their natural talent comes through and allows the players to separate themselves into top NHL players, steady NHL players, and serviceable NHL players. (but it gives you a lot more NHL players either way)

But again, it is a luxury they have because they don't have to rush any of their prospects to fill out a lineup.
Well actually you have babcock mixed up. In context what he was trying to say is when you put a rookie into the NHL (he was talking about Filppula, helm and Ericsson) you have to be careful because its easy for them to play well defensively. They focus so hard on playing well defensively they never develop that high end offensive game that they are capable of.

Its many believe Filppula offensive game was stunted a bit by throwing him into the NHL a bit early for DRW standards. That is probably a large reason why they have tried so hard to keep Helm, Abdlekader and Ericsson out. Babcock believes all three are strong defensive guys who could play today. But bringing them up would force them to become comfortable playing the Kirk Maltby role rather than the Shanahan role.

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07-05-2009, 09:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solo16 View Post
Well actually you have babcock mixed up. In context what he was trying to say is when you put a rookie into the NHL (he was talking about Filppula, helm and Ericsson) you have to be careful because its easy for them to play well defensively. They focus so hard on playing well defensively they never develop that high end offensive game that they are capable of.

Its many believe Filppula offensive game was stunted a bit by throwing him into the NHL a bit early for DRW standards. That is probably a large reason why they have tried so hard to keep Helm, Abdlekader and Ericsson out. Babcock believes all three are strong defensive guys who could play today. But bringing them up would force them to become comfortable playing the Kirk Maltby role rather than the Shanahan role.
I think once Filpulla is centering the 2nd line regularly and on the PP he will get his offensive game will come. His offensive production for a 3rd liner with little to no PP min is actually very very good.

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07-05-2009, 09:33 AM
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solo16
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Originally Posted by r0bert8841 View Post
I think once Filpulla is centering the 2nd line regularly and on the PP he will get his offensive game will come. His offensive production for a 3rd liner with little to no PP min is actually very very good.
But he might have more confidence with the puck and shooting the puck if we let him dominate the AHL for a year.

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07-05-2009, 11:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solo16 View Post
But he might have more confidence with the puck and shooting the puck if we let him dominate the AHL for a year.
Didnt he do that?
http://www.eliteprospects.com/player.php?player=3197
05-06
74-20-50-70

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07-05-2009, 12:18 PM
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19 for president
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No that isn't exactly what he did. He had a great rookie year but don't be fooled he was not the dominant offensive force on that team. That would have been Hudler, Kopecky, and a few others. You can put up points if placed on a good enough line even if you are not dominant. If he had stayed another year he would have been the teams primary scorer and would have had to of scored more on his own and in general take offense into his own hands. Flip until this past playoffs largely gave the puck to one of his linemates and that was that offensively. He doesn't shoot or drive to the net nearly enough and thats something you only do when you have confidence. I think next season you'll see a huge explosion from Flip offensively because he'll finally be a top 6 player with PP time.

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07-05-2009, 01:24 PM
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solo16
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Originally Posted by init2winit View Post
No I don't think I did. I am sure Babcock has said something about prospect development more than once, but what I heard him say is what I wrote. He was talking about guys who can get away with being thrown straight into the NHL (ala Ovechkin) and just letting them do what they can (offense), but how that lets them cheat and get away with not further developing their all-around game. I believe he followed it up by saying they get the points so you don't really follow through with trying to alter their game and that is why they are fortunate enough to not have to do that to their prospects.
Maybe its different quotes. I have read him talk about young guys playing too defensive several times.

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07-05-2009, 01:24 PM
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Originally Posted by 19 for president View Post
No that isn't exactly what he did. He had a great rookie year but don't be fooled he was not the dominant offensive force on that team. That would have been Hudler, Kopecky, and a few others. You can put up points if placed on a good enough line even if you are not dominant. If he had stayed another year he would have been the teams primary scorer and would have had to of scored more on his own and in general take offense into his own hands. Flip until this past playoffs largely gave the puck to one of his linemates and that was that offensively. He doesn't shoot or drive to the net nearly enough and thats something you only do when you have confidence. I think next season you'll see a huge explosion from Flip offensively because he'll finally be a top 6 player with PP time.
I agree with 19 for president. While his last season in the ahl was good it was still fairly early in his development. If he had stayed down another year he would likely have completely dominated it.

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