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Stopping on ice?

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Old
07-12-2009, 07:41 AM
  #26
Gino 14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donGjohnson View Post
You should not worry about doing a proper hockey stop at first. It's better to work on gaining control over your edges, and then proper stopping will follow naturally with a little practice. A lot of newbies do it so they can show off to their friends and spends endless hours trying. Working on doing crossovers as well as possible is a much better plan.
You need to be able to stop in a controlled fashion, not so much for yourself as the safety of the players around you. Nothing worse than having some mutt that's skating out of control skate into you because he has no clue about how to stop. Learn to stop first, worry about going fast second.

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Old
07-12-2009, 09:22 AM
  #27
vivianmb
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train your muscles...
put on wool socks and slide back and forth on a linoleum or wood floor.
laugh all you want it will help.
practice stopping all the time this way and you WILL see a difference.
i guarentee it.

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Old
07-12-2009, 11:20 AM
  #28
difren
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Okay, this is how I learned, or at least my thought process when I first started to get the stops down.

Step one: Skating
Standard skating position should have you bending your knees with a low center of gravity. This is great for skating, not so great for stopping.

Step two: Starting to Stop
When you decide you want to stop (and what I would do is pick a spot that I wanted to stop at, such as every blue line pass, or blue and red lines) you have to raise your center of gravity so that your blades can glide across the ice without your edges digging in. You do this by straightening your legs (unbending your knees from skatin position). Once you have raised your center of gravity, you turn without bending your legs and you will begin to glide (The slide feeling can be practiced as others have said by standing next to the boards and gently grazing the ice with your front skate, or by doing snowplow stops). . You do not want to put weight on either of your edges or you will make a quick turn (which is another thing you will want to learn in the future, but stick to the task at hand). So now if you can glide on the ice (you should be able to spin while doing this without your skates leaving the ice) with your legs straight you're almost done. You want to glide into the position where your skates are perpendicular to the direction you where skating in step one.

Step three: Stopping
Now that you can glide on the ice it's time to use your center of gravity to stop. So you're skating, then you briefly glide sideways (as this is supposed to be a quick stop once you master the basics) bend your knees (placing about 70% of your weight on your back leg, 30% on the front, this should almost come naturally from the lean) while turning your torso towards the direction you want to stop (after a bit you won't need your torso to follow, but it helps while learning). Lean away from the direction you want to stop digging your edges into the ice. The more gradually you bend your knees the slower you should stop. If you bend your knees quickly while doing this, you should stop faster, as your center of gravity is coming down on the edges faster.

Anyway, I hope that helps. Once you figure it out you'll laugh at yourself for not knowing how to do it. At first it is a little difficult to put your body in the position to even do this. The main thing you want to be able to do is glide on the ice sideways. as once you've done that you're really almost there.

Have fun, learn to stop, then move on to the next thing to get your game better.

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Old
07-12-2009, 02:46 PM
  #29
XxLidstromxX
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gino 14 View Post
You need to be able to stop in a controlled fashion, not so much for yourself as the safety of the players around you. Nothing worse than having some mutt that's skating out of control skate into you because he has no clue about how to stop. Learn to stop first, worry about going fast second.
Yea dude, yesterday I was playing, and I almost creamed my friend against the boards. Somehow I stopped without knowing it, I believe it was out of urgency.

Thanks for the tips difren, I will definitely give them a try tomorrow.

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Old
07-12-2009, 06:59 PM
  #30
Hockeyfan68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XxLidstromxX View Post
Yea dude, yesterday I was playing, and I almost creamed my friend against the boards. Somehow I stopped without knowing it, I believe it was out of urgency.

Thanks for the tips difren, I will definitely give them a try tomorrow.
That will probably be the way you learn how to do this, out of a necessity to do so to either p[rotect yourself or a teamate.

It sounds like you are progressing at least so that is good.

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Old
07-12-2009, 07:37 PM
  #31
AIREAYE
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well the way i learned it was to know how to snowplow stop first, the kind used in beginner skiiing (actually now that i think about it, skiing stops and ice stops are pretty similar)

then i just sort of gruaduallly turned to stop

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Old
07-12-2009, 07:41 PM
  #32
TowMater14
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Best word of advice that I can give is practice with duller blades and with some practice it will get easier with sharp edges.

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Old
07-13-2009, 12:03 AM
  #33
adaminnj
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Snow plow stop first then you will get it

start with a snow plow stop then one foot the snow plow then you bring the opposite foot into the stop

I found this vid to help you start the snow plow stop



and now you can say you learned to stop from a fat lady in Florida.

I'll try to show you how the skate position and progression should look an feel with slashes and pipes

first snow plow, \ /

Then one foot snow plow \ |

Then you should be able to progress to a full hockey stop \ \

then work on the other side | / , / /

I hope it helps I have tough a lot of kids to do this.
Good luck!


Last edited by adaminnj: 07-13-2009 at 12:08 AM.
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Old
07-13-2009, 03:12 AM
  #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adaminnj View Post
start with a snow plow stop then one foot the snow plow then you bring the opposite foot into the stop

I found this vid to help you start the snow plow stop



and now you can say you learned to stop from a fat lady in Florida.

I'll try to show you how the skate position and progression should look an feel with slashes and pipes

first snow plow, \ /

Then one foot snow plow \ |

Then you should be able to progress to a full hockey stop \ \

then work on the other side | / , / /

I hope it helps I have tough a lot of kids to do this.
Good luck!
Thanks for the vid man, hopefully that helps me on my journey to stopping

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Old
07-13-2009, 10:25 PM
  #35
MCAKES
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what that video fails to mention is that you need to find the perfect balance between the flat of the blade and the actual sharp part of it. you cant just jam your foot into the ice and expect to keep balance right away. i would practice stopping from a glide so you can learn some control over your edges

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Old
07-13-2009, 10:36 PM
  #36
TheGooooch
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ApogeeRocket View Post
It's probably going to be a power slide.



But be careful if you're going between ice and roller. The number one biggest mental problem people have when going from one to the other is stopping. Roller guys will try to stop by doing a quick turn on the ice and end up falling. Ice guys will try to parallel stop on wheels as if they're on ice with their edges and hurt their ankles and such.
I suppose you could do that on concrete but playing in an actually indoor roller rink there is a lot more grip (on the floor and the wheels). Stopping in roller I suppose is similar to that but not quite the same. I use both feet, like I was stopping on ice, but it takes pretty much stabbing the sport court with your foot at an angle which stops you quickly.

I recently started ice and the toughest thing is definitely going back and forth (between roller and ice). I am fine stopping on ice for the most part unless I have a situation (like in the boards) that I need to stop immediately. My muscles have been trained for years to do the roller stop and that usually means I end up on my ass if I have some speed on ice. I am taking a power skating class at the end of July that should help.

Another difference is the height of the skate (or setup). I played about a month of ice and then went back to roller and it felt like my feet were going to come out from under me for a while.

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Old
07-14-2009, 04:47 PM
  #37
XxLidstromxX
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MCAKES View Post
what that video fails to mention is that you need to find the perfect balance between the flat of the blade and the actual sharp part of it. you cant just jam your foot into the ice and expect to keep balance right away. i would practice stopping from a glide so you can learn some control over your edges
thanks for the tip

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Old
07-14-2009, 07:23 PM
  #38
BadHammy*
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XxLidstromxX View Post
thanks for the tip
That tip is exactly what I was kind of trying to say. If you can do crossovers at an actual high speed, stopping will be so much easier.

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Old
07-14-2009, 10:58 PM
  #39
XxLidstromxX
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donGjohnson View Post
That tip is exactly what I was kind of trying to say. If you can do crossovers at an actual high speed, stopping will be so much easier.
I can do crossovers at a high speed but I really don't want to until I learn how to stop so I don't hurt anybody or myself.

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Old
07-14-2009, 11:58 PM
  #40
CASUAL KEV
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If you end up turning that probably means your not putting enough strength into it. You basically need to turn sideways and shift your weight the opposite way you want to stop. You really have to be strong on your skates to do it and it take time to master. Keep practicing and will come more naturally.

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Old
07-15-2009, 03:45 PM
  #41
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I've heard that people either just "get it" and it comes naturally, or they don't get it and struggle.

Unfortunately for me, I just don't get it I'm working on it every time I'm on the ice, though... and after 8 months, I'm almost there.

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Old
07-15-2009, 05:59 PM
  #42
Hockeyfan68
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All I will say is I tried roller hockey for about 2 months and sold my stuff. I was so used to ice hockey that I could not do things on rollers like I could on ice. I could leg over and burst with great speed but stopping almost killed me or I would get discombobulated and wipe out or whatever.


I can certainly see the trouble you would have adapting to ice from roller.

Good luck anyway seriously and stick with it longer than I did with roller.

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