HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

Do I have the wrong kind of skates?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
07-19-2009, 12:00 PM
  #1
infiniterb
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 101
vCash: 500
Do I have the wrong kind of skates?

I'm a beginner when it comes to ice skating. I've ice skated about 5 times in my life. I'm about 5'9, 175, 27 years old.

So last year I went and bought a set of CCM Vector V8.0 ice hockey skates but only used them a couple of times. A couple of weeks ago I signed up for a beginner adult hockey class and have noticed that in these skates I'm having a hard time stopping. I find that most of my weight is on my inside edge and when I try to stand on both edges, or lean to my outside edge I find it very hard and unstable. I was also having some pain on my arch, so I bought some superfeet insoles which seems to have helped.

I did some research last night and found that for beginners, a stiffer skate boot (which I'm assuming the vector v8.0s are seeing as the higher the number with most skates indicates that the boot is more stiff) will be hard to break in and could never break in.

What do you guys think? Should i go out and buy another pair of skates to learn in, and when I'm comfortable/stronger on my feet move up to the vector v8.0s?

infiniterb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-19-2009, 12:07 PM
  #2
Gunnar Stahl 30
...In The World!
 
Gunnar Stahl 30's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Marty's Better
Country: Iceland
Posts: 14,908
vCash: 500
id stick with the vectors. they might be a bit harder to get used to but atleast you wont have to buy a new pair of skates when you get better and there wont be an adjustment to a stiffer boot.

Gunnar Stahl 30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-19-2009, 12:54 PM
  #3
IniNew
 
IniNew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Keller
Country: United States
Posts: 337
vCash: 500
Sounds like you just have weak ankles right now. You said its been a while since you've skated, so just keep at it.

IniNew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-19-2009, 01:08 PM
  #4
Heat McManus
Registered User
 
Heat McManus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Alexandria, VA
Country: United States
Posts: 10,407
vCash: 500
Check the sharpening before you do anything that cost money.

Heat McManus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-19-2009, 01:46 PM
  #5
Hockeyfan68
Registered User
 
Hockeyfan68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lewiston, ME USA
Country: United States
Posts: 2,418
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by infiniterb View Post
I'm a beginner when it comes to ice skating. I've ice skated about 5 times in my life. I'm about 5'9, 175, 27 years old.

So last year I went and bought a set of CCM Vector V8.0 ice hockey skates but only used them a couple of times. A couple of weeks ago I signed up for a beginner adult hockey class and have noticed that in these skates I'm having a hard time stopping. I find that most of my weight is on my inside edge and when I try to stand on both edges, or lean to my outside edge I find it very hard and unstable. I was also having some pain on my arch, so I bought some superfeet insoles which seems to have helped.

I did some research last night and found that for beginners, a stiffer skate boot (which I'm assuming the vector v8.0s are seeing as the higher the number with most skates indicates that the boot is more stiff) will be hard to break in and could never break in.

What do you guys think? Should i go out and buy another pair of skates to learn in, and when I'm comfortable/stronger on my feet move up to the vector v8.0s?
No don't go buy another pair of skates to learn in you should have a half decent skate like you have now to learn in. Think of it as someone playing guitar (I do and very well) my first guitar was an $800 (at that time in 1982) a Gibson SG I worked all summer for $3.25 hr minimum wage during summer vacation from school to pay for it.

That was the best decision I ever made. learning on a cheap piece of junk that wouldn't stay in tune or would sound like crap would have probably had me lose interest in it who knows.

You have good enough skates my friend with the CCM Vector 8s. While not top of the line they are certainly intermediate and excellent for a beginner.

You need to get them heat molded or as it is called around here affectionately getting them "baked". This eliminates most of the breaking in process though you will still have to wear them for a bit to break them in.

My skates took about 8 to 10 hours of playing hockey after being heat molded to feel comfy.

This is normal.

You just need to play and let them break in, break in time varies so be patieint enough to know that. It sounds like you have barely even used these and because you are a novice the break in time will be even longer as you are not able yet to stress the break in spots as much as someone who really digs in and skates hard.

They will break in but get them heat molded if you haven't yet. That may cost you about $20-$30 depending on the store. usually the store you bought them at does it for free when you buy the skate new.

Other than that you should be good to go and every new skater has a hard time stopping ... your case isn't anything different. It takes time to learn how to skate and do these things.

Hockeyfan68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-19-2009, 01:53 PM
  #6
ccam19
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Sudbury
Country: Canada
Posts: 2
vCash: 500
ur feet arent in hockey shape

ccam19 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-19-2009, 02:01 PM
  #7
infiniterb
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 101
vCash: 500
Thanks for the replies so far. I had the skates baked when I first bought them, and then rebaked last weekend. It just seems to me like the skates are tough to stand straight up in. I also have some movement in the ankle/top of the boot area.

I guess I might just need to do some strength excercises (calf raises?) off ice since I can only skate 1-2 times a week.

infiniterb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-19-2009, 04:36 PM
  #8
Hockeyfan68
Registered User
 
Hockeyfan68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lewiston, ME USA
Country: United States
Posts: 2,418
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by infiniterb View Post
Thanks for the replies so far. I had the skates baked when I first bought them, and then rebaked last weekend. It just seems to me like the skates are tough to stand straight up in. I also have some movement in the ankle/top of the boot area.

I guess I might just need to do some strength excercises (calf raises?) off ice since I can only skate 1-2 times a week.
You're not supposed to stand straight up with hockey skates and this could be your main problem. Knees bent and your upper body bent forward when skating.

if you are bending the knees and are bent forward a bit and are still feeling like that you may have a weird radius cut in your blade runners. For a beginner the radius should be around a 9 foot radius for hockey and also a neutral rocker which means the point which touches the ice should be balanced in the middle of the blade right under your center of gravity.

If the rocker is back further like a defenseman would have it you would feel like you are always on your toes which is what Dmen want because they skate backwards alot.

Have a skate guy who knows what he doing check them with his gauges he has and he can tell you what you have currently for this stuff. I would then suggest going from there and if he does know what he is doing he can set you up with everything the way it should be for a novice.

Hockeyfan68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-20-2009, 12:52 PM
  #9
LilWinger11
 
LilWinger11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Connecticut
Country: United States
Posts: 5,179
vCash: 500
Where did you get your skates- a hockey shop, or a chain store/online? The fact that you have trouble getting onto your outside edge makes me wonder if the skates are too wide/big for you. That is something a lot of beginners have trouble with, so you may just need practice, but it's something to consider, especially if you weren't fitted by a knowledgable hockey guy.

LilWinger11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-20-2009, 01:07 PM
  #10
noobman
Registered User
 
noobman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,636
vCash: 500
Stick with your current skates.

I can guarantee that changing skates won't make stopping any easier. The only thing it might save you is a little discomfort at the end of your skate, but IIRC all beginners get sore feet after about an hour on the ice.

noobman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-20-2009, 01:30 PM
  #11
Analyzer
#WeAreBoston
 
Analyzer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Renfrew, ON.
Country: Canada
Posts: 41,017
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by IniNew View Post
Sounds like you just have weak ankles right now. You said its been a while since you've skated, so just keep at it.
This and the fact that you said you're a beginner means you're not use to skates, or skating, so stick with it and you'll eventually get the hang of it.

Also sounds like your skates aren't tied tight enough, or are too big for you.

As for the arches, get out the blow dryer, some newspaper to put on the floor, or if you have skate guards even better. Warm your skates up with the blow dryer, stick them on and tie them on tight, or how you like to have your skates and the skate will mold to your feet.

Analyzer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-20-2009, 01:42 PM
  #12
infiniterb
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 101
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by LilWinger11 View Post
Where did you get your skates- a hockey shop, or a chain store/online? The fact that you have trouble getting onto your outside edge makes me wonder if the skates are too wide/big for you. That is something a lot of beginners have trouble with, so you may just need practice, but it's something to consider, especially if you weren't fitted by a knowledgable hockey guy.
I got them from a nearby hockey shop. I went back there yesterday and told the guy there my problem. He said the hallow of the blade could be giving me problems so he re-cut it to 5/8". We'll see how that goes. I also got a re-bake done since I had just added in the superfeet insoles but never baked them with the insoles in.

We took out the stock insole and I stepped on the insole. It looked like the skate might be a half size long since there was about half an inch left at the tip of the insole. I tried on another skate that was a half size smaller and I was hitting the end of the skate pretty good.

So I'll give these another shot this week. Hopefully the cut on the blade is better this go round.

infiniterb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-20-2009, 03:32 PM
  #13
Jarick
Moderator
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 23,606
vCash: 500
I'm not an expert on sizing, but typically you want your toes to just brush the end of the skate when you put them on. When you stand up and your feet move forward, you shouldn't be able to get your finger behind your heel. You want that heel locked into place when you skate, otherwise you'll have all kinds of issues. From there, you want a higher arch support if you high arches or lower ones if you have flat feet, otherwise you'll have arch pain. Lace them up snug (not too tight) and make sure the top of your foot isn't being squeezed, otherwise you'll want a different boot which is deeper. Finally, if the sides of your feet are being squeezed at all, try and get a wide or EE model of that skate.

It's absolutely vital that your skates fit comfortably before you bake them. They will move a little bit, but the hard composite materials will not break in much if at all. It's basically a hard plastic shell for your foot, so you need to make sure your foot fits in it, not too tight, not too loose.

I skated in 8D's for a year and was miserable, my foot would roll around and I'd lose my edges, I got tons of cramps and blisters, it was just awful. Got the same skate in a 7.5EE and I haven't had a single foot pain in two years. Try on every skate on the market in every size close to yours before buying one and you'll be a better skater for it.

Jarick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-20-2009, 03:34 PM
  #14
Jarick
Moderator
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 23,606
vCash: 500
Re-reading your post, it sounds like it could just be a balance issue, or possibly your skates are too tight.

Try lacing the bottom half of your boot outside-in, that is the lace goes from above through the eyelet to the middle. Then lace the top half of your boot normally, with the lace going from the middle below the eyelet out and up. This will give you a little more room, which could help with arch pain. I also would only tighten them so they're snug for the bottom half to two-thirds, then tighten them very tight across the ankle.

Jarick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-20-2009, 04:32 PM
  #15
cptjeff
[insert joke here]
 
cptjeff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Washington, DC.
Country: United States
Posts: 8,462
vCash: 501
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
I'm not an expert on sizing, but typically you want your toes to just brush the end of the skate when you put them on. When you stand up and your feet move forward, you shouldn't be able to get your finger behind your heel. You want that heel locked into place when you skate, otherwise you'll have all kinds of issues. From there, you want a higher arch support if you high arches or lower ones if you have flat feet, otherwise you'll have arch pain. Lace them up snug (not too tight) and make sure the top of your foot isn't being squeezed, otherwise you'll want a different boot which is deeper. Finally, if the sides of your feet are being squeezed at all, try and get a wide or EE model of that skate.

It's absolutely vital that your skates fit comfortably before you bake them. They will move a little bit, but the hard composite materials will not break in much if at all. It's basically a hard plastic shell for your foot, so you need to make sure your foot fits in it, not too tight, not too loose.

I skated in 8D's for a year and was miserable, my foot would roll around and I'd lose my edges, I got tons of cramps and blisters, it was just awful. Got the same skate in a 7.5EE and I haven't had a single foot pain in two years. Try on every skate on the market in every size close to yours before buying one and you'll be a better skater for it.
But that's exactly right. Sounds like the skate is the wrong size and fit. Different skates are built to different foot shapes, sounds to me like the V08 is too narrow, and instead of getting a wide size you went a half size up to make it workable.

I haven't tied on the Vector line in a while, but for me they were too narrow and had too high an arch. You could be having similar issues. I wound up in eastons, which fit me wonderfully. CCM Tacks fit pretty well too, and the U+ is much more similar to the tacks fit then the Vector. RBKs are similar as well, but with a wider heel. Bauer Supremes would probalby be an option too...

In short, I don't think your skate fits you, and It's a shame that you didn't get properly fitted. But I think your skates are workable if you want. Certainly they are a nice skate, and will offer plenty of support and protection. A lot of the issues may be alleviated with better lacing and tightening (or rather, not tightening so much in the forefoot). I do think that if you do get serious about playing, you will need to go in and get a properly fitted skate.

cptjeff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-20-2009, 04:55 PM
  #16
hkyplayer03
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2009
Country: United States
Posts: 77
vCash: 500
As a beginner I'd keep the skates you have and build up the strength. When you get confidence in your skating ability invest in better skates. Skates last about 5 years if you play in them about 3 times a week.

Definately give the skates a chance to break in, it's not instant. I have the x60's and the first time I had practice in them my feet felt like crap despite getting them baked. The second skate was much better with a little stiffness on the sides cause I have wide feet. By the 3rd skate, the skates felt broken in and normal.

hkyplayer03 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-21-2009, 10:53 AM
  #17
Jarick
Moderator
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 23,606
vCash: 500
With a skate like the X60, they're so stiff that I'd bet your feet "broke in" to the skates rather than the other way around.

Jarick is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:40 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.