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I don't have "it"

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Old
07-23-2009, 11:06 AM
  #26
octopi
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Bring your team to play floor hockey against my team.


You guys will look like an all star team with rocket boosters on roids against us.

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Old
07-23-2009, 12:38 PM
  #27
LordHelmet
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One thing that I haven't seen mentioned...

Attention to detail..

I'm a pretty low-skill guy in my league. I'm not able to rack up many points or even hang on to the puck very much. Because of that, I find smaller, more attainable challenges - mini-games, if you will - and concentrate on those.

For a lower level guy like me, the payoff is that I know I'm helping the team even if I'm not scoring.

For a better player, this kind of approach makes you pay attention to the small details, keep your head in the game, and hustle more..

examples..

If you're defending in your own zone, concentrate on hounding your D-man at the blueline. To the point that his teammates don't even bother looking his way when they're looking to pass. Make up your mind that your guy isn't even going to touch the puck, much less get a SOG, assist or goal.

If your team has gained possession and is starting to break out, pay attention to moving along with your teammates as a unit, rather than sprinting up the ice ahead of everyone. Be spread out, but not stretched out.

If the puck is loose along the boards, commit to digging it out and gaining/keeping possession for your team.

If the other team gains possession and is breaking out, pay attention to backchecking. HARD. You might not catch up to the point of stealing the puck, but you can at least take away turning lanes and/or passing options.

Commit to the forecheck, and do it HARD. Don't just coast in swinging your stick around. Skate full speed right at the D-man and force him to rush his decision. If he skates it, pursue and harass him all the way down the ice. The goal is to force him into dumping the puck out, icing it, or making an off target pass.

I could go on & on..

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Old
07-25-2009, 01:57 PM
  #28
TheZherdev
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edog37 View Post
nah, you just suck & are a coward....

just kidding....as a coach, it sounds like to me you have a confidence issue, you can do the technical sides of the game, but can't put it together for a game situation. There isn't a drill for this, but there is something else that should help. Most successful players use a technique called visualization. In other words, they imagine themselves in successful situations on the ice & it puts them in the proper mindset. Talbot did this prior to Game 7 by placing himself mentally in the proper place to have success. This isn't day dreaming, this is actually putting yourself in the right frame of mind. Imagine yourself in a game situation & pre-visualize what you want to do. When you get to it, you won't lock up & can perform.
This is probably the best explanation. Experience is probably an issues as well, but really it comes down to confidence. I know because I have the same problem. Back when I played varsity I was always one of the better players at practice. I was good in one on one drills, one of the first to finish the suicides, etc. But when your in a game situation I was a wreck on the ice. I would describe my personality as a timid person that absolutely hates letting his friends and teammates down. And while that mentality might seem like a motivator it can have a counteraffect. Suddenly the you have too much adrenaline pumping in you, your hands begin to shake, you start doubting your abilities, you cant process the game as fast as usually do.

But I have gotten better since high school. I'm a much more confident person in general now, and its really helped me to relax out there and just remember that its just a game. Your just there to have fun. You need to find something that will put you in the right frame of mind before the game. Its not easy but theres not much else you can do.

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Old
07-25-2009, 06:47 PM
  #29
bunjay
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if you have all the fundamental skills but you're not performing well come gametime, i think your problem is reaction time. there is no time to think most of the time. your body has to know what to do. when you hesitate, or react without confidence and power you will be chasing.

skating up ice hoping for a long pass is not usually the right thing to do. its usually more effective to stay with the play and use your teammates more effectively.

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Old
07-25-2009, 07:18 PM
  #30
WickedWrister
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Can this be solved just by practice?

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07-25-2009, 07:41 PM
  #31
Ani simov mal
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Confidence and aggression. You already know that you have a lot of skill compared to opposing players, so keep that in your head. Repeat it over, and over again to your self. Play aggressively. If someone steals the puck from you, don't look up and sigh - stop and chase after it. If there is a loose puck, go after it and don't wait for the other team to take possession. Also, don't be afraid to get hit. Your body is covered in equipment, and I am guessing you are wearing a cage and mouth guard. Trust your equipment.

And remember this, "Enemies on the ice, and friends off the ice."

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Old
07-26-2009, 09:37 AM
  #32
bunjay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WickedWrister View Post
Can this be solved just by practice?
practicing drills will only get you so far. it sounds like you already have a decent skillset. i think the improvement you are looking for will only come from game experience.

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Old
07-27-2009, 03:40 PM
  #33
Johnny Law
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The only thing I would add is that you should try to adapt your game to your strengths.

I've never had the ability to see the holes in the goalie's coverage like real goal scorers do. Now I could go out every game and try to throw down a hatrick but that would just lead to alot of frustration so I play a more playmaker role. I set guys up and establish the zone and all that jazz.

Hockey isn't always about scoring, one of my favorite teammates hardly ever scores but he plays rock solid defense and is a great puck mover. Think about the things you do well and tailor you game to emphasize those skills.

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Old
07-28-2009, 02:29 PM
  #34
EmptyNetter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WickedWrister View Post
Sorry, I'm a forward, usually LW.

Something I think I need to work on is being more active in the play. I don't want to say I'm a soft floater but whenever I think my team is going to gain possession of the puck, I speed up ice trying to get a long outlet pass.

Usually, I won't get that pass in stride because I'm far away from the puck, or it will come to hard and I won't be able to take it cleanly. My next game is tonight, and I think I'm going to help by trying to skate the puck out of my zone instead of looking for long passes.
I'm a left wing, too, and I have a horrible time catching that clearing pass at the point. But I'm a little concerned about you breaking hard for the other blueline if your defenseman hasn't even cleared the puck from your end yet.

You've got to look at hockey as being part of a team. There is likely going to be a defenseman anticipating your d-man wrapping the puck around the boards. If the puck doesn't clear the blue line it's going back into the zone and your defensemen get no rest -- they'll probably hate you for that. What's more, the more fatigued THEY are the more likely the other team is to score during their possession forcing your team to have to catch up. I can't give any technical advice on how to catch a pass that's behind you but that's something you'll be best off practicing with a team mate. The alternative is to stand at the wall and cut off the pass but then you've got no momentum to skate with the puck and you've got a defenseman ready to strip the puck from you. But to sum up:

Priority #1: Be in position and don't take yourself out of the play
Priority #2: It's your responsibility to help clear the way for the puck to get out of the zone. Lift the defender's stick or box him out if you need to!
Priority #3: If possible get the puck through the neutral zone. Give your team a chance to change lines if necessary and get fresh legs on the ice. If everyone is fresh then attack!

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Old
07-28-2009, 02:41 PM
  #35
rinkrat22
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none of us have "IT". that is why we are on a message board. Go have fun.

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Old
07-28-2009, 03:03 PM
  #36
BigFatPapa
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While my point has been partly mentionned in segments earlier, I'd just like to point out what I feel would be the most important thing for you. Basically, for a good player, every single decision should have been made before the game, not during. Whatever situation you get yourself in, you should always know what to do so you can simply do it.

This can be done in many ways that have been mentionned. Visualisation, watching elite players that play your position and thinking about your errors after games are great ways to "solve problems". If you don't think about your errors, you'll screw up next time you get in the same position. After games, you also have to remember your good plays, especially those who are somewhat accidental (like when you tell yourself "how did I get into the offensive zone so easily? How did I end up alone in the crease? How did I get out of the corner with the puck?") This is where experience comes into play, but you need to make that experience worthy.

One last thing. It's always a good thing to try to learn at least a little about other positions, especially the one you get matched against the most (if you're a LW, it would be RD). That way, you can figure out how you'd beat yourself if you were in your opponent's skates, which makes the whole "visualisation" process much more efficient. But then again, you need to think about these things before the game, after the game, but not during the game.

And yeah, two more things. I'm not sure about your level and it might have been mentionned, but always keep your head up (with and without the puck) and have fun cause it's only a game after all.

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Old
07-29-2009, 01:27 PM
  #37
Pog Form
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I would recommend checking out the book "Hockey Tough: A Winning Mental Game" by Dr. Saul Miller. It focuses a lot on visualization, which has already been discussed in this thread as something that might be helpful for you.

Honestly, check it out. It's worth a read. You can probably even find a sampling of it on Google Books if you're hesitant.

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Old
07-30-2009, 11:04 AM
  #38
The ORB
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I dont know what facilities they have in your neck of the woods, but around here there are a few smaller rinks (about 2/3 size) specially designed for 3-on-3 hockey and training. The beauty of this game is that the small size means their is a lot more action. It is supposed to help players get used to constantly making quick decisions without over thinking the play. Might help you improve your game effectiveness, but I have no clue if such rinks exist elsewhere. The ones I use are in the GTA and are run by NTR which is owned by Mike Gartner.

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