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Just started up again, A few basic questions here...

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Old
07-28-2009, 12:11 PM
  #1
Garfinkel1
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Just started up again, A few basic questions here...

I am a size 9 shoe, should I get 8 1/2 sized skates? What size should I get.
Can I/should I just order them online?

I want a flexible stick. Relatively cheap. Money is not really that much of an issue but I don't think it is realistic to spend 80$+ on a stick since i'm just starting up...Looking for more around 25$ range.

I read a bunch of the advice threads for new players. So thanks for all that guys.


EDIT:
Another question - I was looking online and I am sooo confused. There are So many skates I don't know where to start. Can anyone recommend me skates for under 80$? Also, why is the sizing like 6.0D, 7.0D. What does the D mean?


Last edited by Garfinkel1: 07-28-2009 at 12:20 PM.
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07-28-2009, 12:38 PM
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Placebo Effect
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I'm newer too but have done lots of reading so I'll take a stab.

Skates usually fit 1 to 1.5 sizes smaller than your shoes. You CAN buy online as it is usually cheaper but it is HIGHLY recommended you go to your LHS and get fitted properly there. That way you can also get them baked. Skates all fit differently and different brands, even different lines within a brand, will fit feet better or worse than others. So it's advisable not to have your mind set on one brand.

For sticks, 25 range will be a wood stick and the Sherwood 5030 is very popular. If you want composite my buddy got a Reebok 5K for around 60 CAD I believe (maybe more, can't remember). How tall are you though? Since you want a flexible stick and if you're not very tall you can try to get an intermediate stick, which are shorter and more flexible than seniors. Senior sticks also usually come in three flexes, mid, regular and stiff.

Skates for under 80? I can't really help you much there but check out http://www.hockeymonkey.com/iceskates-bauer-sr.html. No idea how good those skates are (likely not very) and their durability is probably pretty low. Your best bet for under 80 is to find some used skates.

As for the D, that's the width. D is regular width foot. E or EE is wide feet.

You may want to check out http://www.hockeymonkey.com/sizingcharts.html. But these are just guides and won't necessarily be correct.

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07-28-2009, 01:27 PM
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Garfinkel1
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Originally Posted by Rick The Rypper View Post
I'm newer too but have done lots of reading so I'll take a stab.

Skates usually fit 1 to 1.5 sizes smaller than your shoes. You CAN buy online as it is usually cheaper but it is HIGHLY recommended you go to your LHS and get fitted properly there. That way you can also get them baked. Skates all fit differently and different brands, even different lines within a brand, will fit feet better or worse than others. So it's advisable not to have your mind set on one brand.

For sticks, 25 range will be a wood stick and the Sherwood 5030 is very popular. If you want composite my buddy got a Reebok 5K for around 60 CAD I believe (maybe more, can't remember). How tall are you though? Since you want a flexible stick and if you're not very tall you can try to get an intermediate stick, which are shorter and more flexible than seniors. Senior sticks also usually come in three flexes, mid, regular and stiff.

Skates for under 80? I can't really help you much there but check out http://www.hockeymonkey.com/iceskates-bauer-sr.html. No idea how good those skates are (likely not very) and their durability is probably pretty low. Your best bet for under 80 is to find some used skates.

As for the D, that's the width. D is regular width foot. E or EE is wide feet.

You may want to check out http://www.hockeymonkey.com/sizingcharts.html. But these are just guides and won't necessarily be correct.
Thanks a lot. If you highly recommend it I will go over to the store to a rink to get skates. Do they bake them on site or do I do it in my oven? (I don't know if that is a dumb question. Do they really "bake" them?

As for Sticks, I am 5'5. I have been used to wooden sticks so I'll probably get that Sherwood 5030 (assuming it's flex)

I'll check out those URL's though to see how they are priced online. Again, thank you.



Anyone know anything about

Easton Synergy 500 Sr. Ice Hockey Skates


Last edited by Garfinkel1: 07-28-2009 at 01:38 PM.
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07-28-2009, 01:37 PM
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Garfinkel1
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Edit:woops double post.

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07-28-2009, 02:42 PM
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predfan24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garfinkel1 View Post

EDIT:
Another question - I was looking online and I am sooo confused. There are So many skates I don't know where to start. Can anyone recommend me skates for under 80$? Also, why is the sizing like 6.0D, 7.0D. What does the D mean?

You can go cheap on alot of hockey equipment but defiantly not skates. Even as a begginer I wouldn't recommend skates that cheap. You don't need top tier skates however I would at least suggest a mid tier skate to give you some support. Shop around and look for sales and clearances and you probably find a decent pair for 150-200.

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07-28-2009, 03:58 PM
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Garfinkel1
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Originally Posted by predfan24 View Post
You can go cheap on alot of hockey equipment but defiantly not skates. Even as a begginer I wouldn't recommend skates that cheap. You don't need top tier skates however I would at least suggest a mid tier skate to give you some support. Shop around and look for sales and clearances and you probably find a decent pair for 150-200.
What about Easton Synergy 500's?

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07-28-2009, 05:00 PM
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Your equipment should not be less than an INTERMEDIATE quality whether you are a beginner, been away for a while and just want to play weekends once or twice a month or whatever .... that will suit you.

Skates run different sizes with different companies so you CANNOT go by "get one and half sizes smaller than your shoe size" as a rule. There are a couple of companies that are actually your shoe size and they stopped doing it after a few years as another company took them over.

I wear a couple of pair of 2002-2003 bauer Vapor skates and they are size 11.5 EE (E widths are wider than normal feet) and one pair are a size 12D (the D means a normal width). Both fit relatively the same though the 12D feel good with double socks for outdoor ice as to not get frostbitten.

But I wear a size 13 shoe and the 11.5 EE fit me nicely. You should check other skates and sizes when trying them on, I do NOT wear EE shoes but the EE width of bauer fit me nicely and the D width which I should take is too narrow. CCM skates are a bit wider naturally so I probably would do okay with a normal D width for CCM. See what I mean here?

Nike used to be an exact size and then they incorporated with bauer and I believe Mission skates are exactly your shoe size as well.

Basically not to make it sound too complex make sure you research the MODEL skate you are planning on buying. Better yet BUY IN A STORE where they have foot measuring tools.

If you do choose to buy skates online do so after researching that model skate first, reading some reviews from people who own them already online (do a Google search) or make a post in this forum and ask someone.

As for sticks for $25 .... go with a wood stick, you won't find much else for $25 worth a crap to even buy honestly.

The rest of your gear you can get good prices on intermediate gear like $34 shinguards by CCM that ware good enough for ice hockey and do the job. They won't be as spiffy awesome or light like the more expensive and you may get hit on the back of the leg and not have the same protection as the $95 ones but but for recreational hockey you should be fine.

Unfortunately since most everything is made in China it is cheaper to buy these days..... except composite sticks where the hockey companies are ****** their customers by overcharging because they are so popular despite the supply and demand theory.

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07-28-2009, 06:17 PM
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MJP
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If your just starting up again, I suggest getting a cheap good shaft.

http://www.hockeymonkey.com/easton-h...th-s5-sr1.html

That is a good shaft, a buddy of mine bought one like 4 years ago and its still in working condition (doesn't use it in leagues anymore). Shafts are alot lighter, especially compared to that sherwood, which might be the heaviest stick alive, and they flex way more, giving you a better shot. Also the blade on that sherwood is garbage, one good hack and that thing will split like crazy.

Do keep in mind though that the flex you use should be the closest to what half your weight is. My friend is like 210 and had an 80 flex and took a slapper and the shaft snapped. As far as senior or intermediate, its not gonna matter that much, because any shaft can be cut down to a suitable length. Just make sure you cut the butt end. Seniors are a little more money, but you can usually find way more choices.

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07-28-2009, 06:41 PM
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Little Nilan
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I was looking for used skates as "war" skates, any recommendations/advice? Is it better to buy directly from someone or go to a Play-it-again sports. Do they still make those Bauer Classic Golds or something similar? That's the kind of skate I'm looking for, nothing fancy but gets the job done.

And I know people here are big on not going cheap on equipement, especially skates, but to put things in perspective we had a guy in college who used to come with his dads 1970s equipement, it was basically an antique and he still owned the crap out of everyone. The soviets had horrible equipement and that's by standards of 30 years ago. Just saying, it doesn't make the player and like a guy playing on a horrible piano, if you can play well on it, imagine what you'll do on the 250 000$ one.


Last edited by Little Nilan: 07-28-2009 at 06:53 PM.
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07-28-2009, 08:56 PM
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Skraut
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
I wear a couple of pair of 2002-2003 bauer Vapor skates and they are size 11.5 EE (E widths are wider than normal feet) and one pair are a size 12D (the D means a normal width). Both fit relatively the same though the 12D feel good with double socks for outdoor ice as to not get frostbitten.

But I wear a size 13 shoe and the 11.5 EE fit me nicely. You should check other skates and sizes when trying them on, I do NOT wear EE shoes but the EE width of bauer fit me nicely and the D width which I should take is too narrow. CCM skates are a bit wider naturally so I probably would do okay with a normal D width for CCM. See what I mean here?
Like the author of this thread, I'm a newbie too, but the advice I have mimmics what Hockeyfan68 says "get measured." I normally wear size 11.5 to 12 shoes, and was shocked to when I was measured that the 2 skates that fit the best were size 9 RBK and a size 8.5 Bauer. I ended up with the RBK skates, and now that they are broken in they fit great, but had I purchased them without getting measured, there's no way I would have selected something that small.

Ran into a guy at the last open skate bragging about his new skates and all the things he had to go through to locate a size 14 skate. I asked what his shoe size was, he looked at me like I was stupid and said "14 of course." He was on the ice all of 10 minutes fell a half dozen times, and quit. I don't even want to know how expensive of a lesson that was for him.


Last edited by Skraut: 07-28-2009 at 09:14 PM.
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07-28-2009, 10:51 PM
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Hockeyfan68
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Originally Posted by Skraut View Post
Like the author of this thread, I'm a newbie too, but the advice I have mimmics what Hockeyfan68 says "get measured." I normally wear size 11.5 to 12 shoes, and was shocked to when I was measured that the 2 skates that fit the best were size 9 RBK and a size 8.5 Bauer. I ended up with the RBK skates, and now that they are broken in they fit great, but had I purchased them without getting measured, there's no way I would have selected something that small.

Ran into a guy at the last open skate bragging about his new skates and all the things he had to go through to locate a size 14 skate. I asked what his shoe size was, he looked at me like I was stupid and said "14 of course." He was on the ice all of 10 minutes fell a half dozen times, and quit. I don't even want to know how expensive of a lesson that was for him.
Wow that musta hurt his wallet to make a mistake like that. I hate to see that .... this is why THIS forum is so awesome. Knowledgable people here with good advice.

I learn new things all the time in here.

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07-29-2009, 02:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garfinkel1 View Post
I am a size 9 shoe, should I get 8 1/2 sized skates? What size should I get.
Can I/should I just order them online?

I want a flexible stick. Relatively cheap. Money is not really that much of an issue but I don't think it is realistic to spend 80$+ on a stick since i'm just starting up...Looking for more around 25$ range.

I read a bunch of the advice threads for new players. So thanks for all that guys.


EDIT:
Another question - I was looking online and I am sooo confused. There are So many skates I don't know where to start. Can anyone recommend me skates for under 80$? Also, why is the sizing like 6.0D, 7.0D. What does the D mean?
Definitely go to a pro shop for the skates. If you want to give us a general idea of what city you live in/near, someone might be able to recommend a place. You need to be able to try on several different models, brands, sizes, and widths to get one that fits *your* foot.

$25 is pretty much only gonna get you a wood stick, but that's fine to start out/re-start out. I've been playing off and on for three years and I'm just starting to think about going composite. The Sher-Wood 5030 is a good beginner stick from what I've heard, but handle some different sticks while you're at the shop and see what feels good in your hands. Chances are the employees there will have suggestions too.

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07-29-2009, 08:52 PM
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you can always go try on skates, then order the best fitting pair online if they're cheaper,
most stores will bake them if you just take them in anyway, so if you can save money, go for it

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07-30-2009, 12:48 PM
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Garfinkel1
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Originally Posted by LilWinger11 View Post
Definitely go to a pro shop for the skates. If you want to give us a general idea of what city you live in/near, someone might be able to recommend a place. You need to be able to try on several different models, brands, sizes, and widths to get one that fits *your* foot.

$25 is pretty much only gonna get you a wood stick, but that's fine to start out/re-start out. I've been playing off and on for three years and I'm just starting to think about going composite. The Sher-Wood 5030 is a good beginner stick from what I've heard, but handle some different sticks while you're at the shop and see what feels good in your hands. Chances are the employees there will have suggestions too.
Long Island. I live on the North shore near Oysterbay, Glen cove. Manhasset and Syosset are like 15 minutes away.

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07-30-2009, 12:49 PM
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Garfinkel1
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Originally Posted by pond hockey vet View Post
you can always go try on skates, then order the best fitting pair online if they're cheaper,
most stores will bake them if you just take them in anyway, so if you can save money, go for it
I feel like that's alittle messed up. They reason your paying alittle more is because you are getting that service. That help and advice.

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