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Old
08-17-2009, 08:00 PM
  #26
Danrik
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Originally Posted by FLYLine24 View Post
Zero.
This.

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Old
08-18-2009, 09:05 AM
  #27
vyktor
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Originally Posted by IniNew View Post
Judging by your second post, you've already made up your mind.

I don't have any experience with Rugby, but with my experience in other sports I can honestly tell you that hockey is the hardest thing to just jump into and play. You don't just play one position with a set hierarchy of things to do. You play everywhere and have to know what to do all over the ice. The physical part of the game is the easiest part to pick up. It's the hockey plays, thinking, vision that take years to mold.
Having played both Rugby and hockey I think it's probably one of the best sports to cross over from. It's fluid and brutal, like hockey; after a scrum, ruck, maul or line-out, positions tend to become unimportant, while positioning is key. Oh and on a Rugby field you learn really quick to keep your head up, and just let that 'hospital pass' sail on by. Being in good shape, a natural athlete will help a lot. the big problem will be skating, it's like to play hockey you have to learn to walk/run all over again.

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08-18-2009, 09:49 AM
  #28
Ollie Queen
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Originally Posted by vyktor View Post
Having played both Rugby and hockey I think it's probably one of the best sports to cross over from. It's fluid and brutal, like hockey; after a scrum, ruck, maul or line-out, positions tend to become unimportant, while positioning is key. Oh and on a Rugby field you learn really quick to keep your head up, and just let that 'hospital pass' sail on by. Being in good shape, a natural athlete will help a lot. the big problem will be skating, it's like to play hockey you have to learn to walk/run all over again.
Learning to keep your head up in rugby will not help you keep your head up at all in hockey. Because you're in skates, stickhandling a tiny piece of rubber on a sheet of ice, you look down to maintain control. There is virtually no way that someone who has only been playing hockey since January has advanced to the point where they can sprint with the puck on their stick without looking down most of the time.

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08-18-2009, 10:06 AM
  #29
iamjs
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Originally Posted by me like hockey View Post
It's not a question of how hard I am willing to work, just of how hard they need me to work. Without a hint of pride I can say that I am about as athletic of a person as you can find. I'd also like to think I pick things up pretty quick. My ultimate goal is playing for them eventually, but even if I end up just practicing and having a good time in a competitive rec league I would be satisfied. As for hitting, I played rugby for two years and boxed on and off for two. Also played catcher in high school. I think I'll be fine.
Not to sound like a jerk or anything, but the above bolded sounds like you're willing to do just enough to get by.

That usually doesn't equate into a lot of minutes per game.

The thing I learned after taking a few years off was not what do they want me to do, but what else can I do and how much further can I push myself beyond that? Don't let yourself get settled into a comfortable groove where you coast through a season doing only what is asked. More than likely, it'll lead to a short hockey "career", to the point of where rec league teams won't even bother with you.

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Old
08-19-2009, 09:49 PM
  #30
WDR357
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Hmmm, maybe it is a troll thread? If it isn't? Look at it this way, if a kid from Canada said he started playing football a couple months ago and came onto a football board and asked what his chances of playing for Carson-Newman were, what do you think people would say? That's where you stand even playing club hockey. The team might take you for practices but it would be tough to crack the lineup.

I would find a figure skating coach and have them advance your skating ability every week. Nothing is more important. Everything else noted earlier regarding eating, living and breathing hockey through playing, reading books, watching videos is spot on. It would be your only chance. Don't just go to open stick practices. You'll pick up lousy technique before you know it. Being 6'4" 190 pounds can be a big advantage once you know how to really skate and play but you'd get destroyed in a checking game until then. Kids 5'7" and 165 pounds would line you up any chance they have to have a good laugh and with say ten plus years of playing behind them they're probably really good at it. Trust me, having played football and hockey, hitting the ice after an open ice hit in hockey hurts a hell of a lot longer than a football tackle. The ice has zero give! Hits on the boards you reeally don't feel much at all.

If you want to start refining your skating, Laura Stamm's Power Skating is a good place to start. Plenty of videos and books. Good luck!

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Old
08-20-2009, 10:49 AM
  #31
Pedagogue
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Originally Posted by me like hockey View Post
I'm 2 months from turning 20. I am 6'4 190 lbs. For cardio I run 3 miles a day. For upper body I do a home made concoction of workouts for 30 to 45 min. I also stretch for 15 min before and after.

The question now is, what are my chances of playing college hockey in Tennessee having just started in January?
I do not know how to take this post. Is this a D1, D2 or D3 college team. Is it intramural? How long have you been skating? I do not think the poster really understands how difficult of a game hockey is. To be honest, the poster couldn't even play on a "C" level rec team.

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Old
08-20-2009, 09:23 PM
  #32
SJGoalie32
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Originally Posted by me like hockey View Post
For cardio I run 3 miles a day. For upper body I do a home made concoction of workouts for 30 to 45 min. I also stretch for 15 min before and after.

The question now is, what are my chances of playing college hockey in Tennessee having just started in January?
What the heck does your workout regimen have to do with anything?

There are a TON of kids in their teens and early 20's in college sports programs that do that or more on a given day. I mean, it's great that you're in shape, but don't kid yourself that running 3 miles a day suddenly qualifies you for a spot on a competitive club sport team.

Let me put it to you like this......running 3 miles a day qualifies you for a college hockey club about as much my ability to run a 4.6 40-yard dash and my experience with intramural flag football qualifies me to be a starting wide receiver for a junior college team.

Quote:
It's not a question of how hard I am willing to work, just of how hard they need me to work.
At the lower levels (youth, rec league, crappy high school), sure. You can be successful with either hard work OR talent. But at the higher competitive levels, skill really does take over; and at the highest of levels, you need to have both.

Simply working hard won't be enough to generate an 80-mph slapshot with pinpoint accuracy, and no amount of hard work is enough to make up for the lack of one.

Quote:
I'd also like to think I pick things up pretty quick.
Competitive teams aren't interested in players might can pick things up in half a season.....they want players who already have the requisite tools from Day 1 of tryouts and are simply in need of a little fine tuning.

Quote:
As for hitting, I played rugby for two years and boxed on and off for two. Also played catcher in high school. I think I'll be fine.
I'm sorry, but that attitude is dangerous, not only to you, but to those around you.

Oscar De La Hoya is one tough SOB. Put him on ice skates and send him into a corner after a puck against fast, tough, experienced hockey players, and he will get knocked the **** out.

One wrong turn and you're paralyzed. One wrong turn, and you might paralyze someone else.

These sports are not the same. Don't try to pretend they are. You can get away with that thinking in non-checking rec leagues, but don't bring it onto a competitive full contact sheet of ice.

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Old
08-21-2009, 12:08 AM
  #33
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