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The All-Time AAA11 Thread (sign-up, roster post, picks, etc)

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Old
09-03-2009, 12:41 PM
  #176
VanIslander
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Halifax selects Rick Smith, a two time Ontario juniors all-star dman who was drafted 6th overall in 1966 and didn't disappoint, going on to become a Stanley Cup winning defensive defenseman who had seven good seasons in Boston split in half by trips to lesser teams and even three years in the lucrative paying WHA where he twice put up around 100 PIM seasons despite never getting even 70 PIM in any of his eleven NHL seasons. His NHL career plus-minus was a notable +185. He also got a decent 25 playoff points in 75 NHL postseason games as a Bruin, an impressive number given his stay-at-home style of play.



Quote:
"He was a quiet guy and he was steady. He knew how to win from his days in Boston. He was good for the younger guys; a real stay-at-home defenseman."
http://books.google.ca/books?id=OvXs...hockey&f=false

Quote:
He joined the Bruins in 1968-69, making a solid contribution to the team's efforts to secure Lord Stanley in 1970. By then, Smith had established himself as a solid, steady rearguard who always attended to the homework of his own zone.

Early in 1972, he was dealt to the California Golden Seals where he played for two season before jumping to the rival WHA for three years with the Minnesota Fighting Saints.

He then jumped back to the NHL midway through the 1975-76 campaign by signing with the St. Louis Blues. After a short stay, the Bruins reacquired Smith in 1976. There he remained a key member of the Bruin clubs that consistently finished at the top of the standings. In 1980, however, he was claimed on waivers by Detroit, splitting his final season of pro hockey between the Wings and the Washington Capitals.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=14373

Not really a fighter, with less than a PIM per game career average, but here is a funny video that shows his heart. He falls and is sit on but he gets several good licks in beforehand, in ol' rough and tumble seventies hockey fight style:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-ei4po2blI


Last edited by VanIslander: 09-03-2009 at 12:53 PM.
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Old
09-03-2009, 01:02 PM
  #177
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hmm... really wanted Wildor Larochelle. Would have made an excellent all-around 3rd liner - the kind who can check, play tough, and was also a really good offensive player for his time.

So I'm going to build a 3rd line starting with RW Don Saleski and C Viktor Shuvalov.

Saleski was a shutdown winger with the Broad Street Bullies. A decent scorer, his job was mostly defensive work and physical play.

Shuvalov was a great offensive center in the times of Bobrov and Guryshev. Not quite as prolific a scorer, his bio from Kings Of the Ice shows him to be much more responsible defensively than either of them.

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Old
09-03-2009, 01:23 PM
  #178
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Halifax also select feisty, strong, fast, hard-working, talented right winger Martin Lapointe, truly a valuable role player whose leadership qualities saw him wear the 'A' for four teams, including a World Juniors team in which he scored 17 points in 21 WJC tourney games over three years. He was a Quebec league all-star, Memorial Cup all-star team member, a 1991 first round draft pick of the Red Wings, and one of Bowman's favorite players. As a 23 year old in Detroit's 1997 Stanley Cup championship, he scored 12 playoff points and registered 60 PIM in 20 games - a force indeed. He helped the Wings defend the Cup the next postseason with 9 playoff goals and 15 points in 21 games. All in all, he scored 43 playoff points in 108 NHL postseason games. He finished his career nine games shy of a thousand games with seven 100+ PIM seasons and 381 NHL points.



Quote:
Lapointe's commitment to checking and battling in the corners put him in coach Scotty Bowman's good graces. His style of play was an integral part of the team's consecutive Stanley Cup titles in 1997 and 1998. He even turned on the offense in the repeat season with nine post-season goals.

In the spring of 2000, Lapointe represented his homeland at the World Championships and by the 2000-01 season, he was needed on offense for the Wings as the club reconfigured its line up. He scored a personal-high 20 goals and helped Detroit finish with the second-highest regular season point total in the league.

After eleven seasons in Detroit, Lapointe decided to test the free agent market and signed with the Boston Bruins in the summer of 2001. Upon his arrival in Boston, Lapointe has continued his gritty play, despite missing several games due to injury. In 2003-04, Lapointe played in his 700th career game and surpassed the 300-point plateau before being acquired by the Chicago Blackhawks in the summer of 2005.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=10888


Last edited by VanIslander: 09-03-2009 at 01:36 PM.
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Old
09-03-2009, 01:28 PM
  #179
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
Halifax also select feisty, strong, fast, hard-working, talented right winger Martin Lapointe, truly a valuable role player whose leadership qualities saw him wear the 'A' for five NHL teams
Impressive feat for a guy who only played on four teams (and I don't think he was an assistant captain on the Senators).

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09-03-2009, 01:42 PM
  #180
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Impressive feat for a guy who only played on four teams (and I don't think he was an assistant captain on the Senators).
Thanks. Checked and fixed.

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09-03-2009, 02:21 PM
  #181
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Michigan drafts Patrice Brisebois.

420 points
1009 games



from Legends
Quote:
After having reached the Memorial Cup tournament three times in his junior career (1989, 1990 and 1991), the young blueliner's first full season in the NHL culminated in a Stanley Cup championship. Brisebois scored ten goals in the regular season and demonstrated poise as the club moved deeper into the playoffs. In 1997-98, he scored 37 points, registered a +16 plus/minus rating and helped the Habs reach the second round of the playoffs. As the franchise struggled in the late 1990s, Brisebois was a constant on the defensive brigade. He set a personal high with 15 goals in 2000-01 and was an integral part of the club's playoff hopes in 2001-02.

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09-03-2009, 02:21 PM
  #182
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Michigan drafts Keith Brown.

342 points
876 games



from Legends
Quote:
Defenceman Keith Brown was a steady two-way performer for 16 NHL seasons. He was equally proficient at looking after matters in his own zone and contributing on offence.

Brown was a solid player in all phases of the game and a die-hard competitor. He reached double figures in goals twice and helped Chicago reach the Stanley Cup finals in 1992 and the semi-finals in 1982, 1983, 1985, and 1989. His tenacious effort on the ice took its toll on Brown's body as he missed considerable time as a result of injuries in seven of his 14 years in the Windy City.

Late in his career Brown was shipped to the expansion Florida Panthers to add stability and defence to the young squad. He was a solid +11 in 51 games the first years the retired in 1995 after seeing action in only 13 contests

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09-03-2009, 08:10 PM
  #183
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LW: P.J. Axelsson
G: Marty Turco

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09-03-2009, 08:31 PM
  #184
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What a wonderful day this was!

Quote:
Day 7:
Prague: Lubomir Visnovsky (d), Buzz Boll (lw)
Cumberland County: Stephane Yelle (c), Mark Osborne (lw)
Toledo: Wildor Larochelle (rw), Yevgeny Mishakov (lw)
Halifax: Rick Smith (d), Martin Lapointe (rw)
Regina: Don Saleski (rw), Viktor Shuvalov (c)
Michigan: Patrice Brisebois (d), Keith Brown (d)
Ottawa: P.J. Axelsson (lw), Marty Turco (g)


Nine guys from my shortlists, including three and maybe four I think are main ATD worthy as role players. Definitely most could've/should've gone in the MLD.

In terms of the value of a player in an all-time context in assembling a complete team (as opposed to just an all-star game roster), this has been one of the top-3 days of the draft imo.

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09-03-2009, 08:38 PM
  #185
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Now I have to figure out who should start at 3rd line LW...Axelsson or Libett.

Libett may barely have the offensive ability to pass as a two-way LW for Young..but really..he's a two-way third-line guy. Hm..could always use Axelsson on the 4th line with Gingras. That won't be fun to play against..

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09-03-2009, 08:46 PM
  #186
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chaosrevolver View Post
Now I have to figure out who should start at 3rd line LW...Axelsson or Libett.

Libett may barely have the offensive ability to pass as a two-way LW for Young..but really..he's a two-way third-line guy. Hm..could always use Axelsson on the 4th line with Gingras. That won't be fun to play against..
Usually the penalty killing specialist and soley defensive-oriented forward would see fourth line minutes unless one of the other lines had a powerful duo along with a rushing dman and then a left wing lock kind of defensive winger allows for smooth transition of a puck controlling team.

Libett has a decent number of game winning goals (27) and while he probably wouldn't produce much offensive in an all-time level of play his career numbers and powerplay production shows he has the puck-carrying skills to handle third line duty.

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09-03-2009, 08:57 PM
  #187
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Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
Usually the penalty killing specialist and soley defensive-oriented forward would see fourth line minutes unless one of the other lines had a powerful duo along with a rushing dman and then a left wing lock kind of defensive winger allows for smooth transition of a puck controlling team.

Libett has a decent number of game winning goals (27) and while he probably wouldn't produce much offensive in an all-time level of play his career numbers and powerplay production shows he has the puck-carrying skills to handle third line duty.
Was my thought as well. Either way, neither line will be fun to play against once I fill the two lines.

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09-03-2009, 11:04 PM
  #188
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
What a wonderful day this was!




Nine guys from my shortlists, including three and maybe four I think are main ATD worthy as role players. Definitely most could've/should've gone in the MLD.

In terms of the value of a player in an all-time context in assembling a complete team (as opposed to just an all-star game roster), this has been one of the top-3 days of the draft imo.
we need more discussion instead of just "pick, see ya later, pick, see ya later..." the more I hear out of you from each pick, the better. But I'd also love to see what others think of every pick.

We should consider designating a "discussion sparker" every day of the draft. One guy who has to do a review of all 14 picks of the day. Little two-liners on each player. For example:

Visnovsky: Not bad. One of the better offensive defensemen left, but there were better guys.

Boll: Interesting pick. Will he be a playoff hero, like he was one year, or a playoff dud like he was every other year? Is he just a secondary offensive player, or did he have some grit? Don't just assume because he has a funny nickname like Pud, Mush, Mud, or Hinky!

Yelle: I think he was taken right where he belongs. He's not special in that he should be an ATD player, or likely MLD player. He was good at what he did though.

Osborne: As a Leafs fan, I can tell you he's so not special. Overrated by career totals and a couple 60-point seasons. Was ok but not excellent defensively.

Larochelle: Pick of the day. Completely depleted the elite defensive RW position.

Mishakov: Seems like one of the toughest Russians out there.

Smith: What separates him from other available stay at home guys?

Lapointe: Good grit/energy player at this level. A good winning history too, and a leader.

Brisebois: Really? Why?

Brown: I guess I have to ask the same thing I asked about Rick Smith.

Axelsson: This is more like it. I don't think he's an ATD player.

Turco: Was definitely on my list for a backup goalie (I already have a starter) - I admit that the next 10 names in goal all blend into a mush for me. You really can't go wrong with any of them.

If a few people reply to this and get some discussion going, mission accomplished! Now someone else do this tomorrow.

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09-03-2009, 11:36 PM
  #189
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I agree with you seventies about Visnovsky, Osborne and:

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Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Boll: Interesting pick. Will he be a playoff hero, like he was one year, or a playoff dud like he was every other year? Is he just a secondary offensive player, or did he have some grit? Don't just assume because he has a funny nickname like Pud, Mush, Mud, or Hinky!
Funny name indeed. I think it unfair to use the term 'dud' as it suggests he ought to have scored. It sure seems like he was a NONscorer in the playoffs who showed he could score with one exceptional postseason. The question is whether his primary responsibility was defensive at times other than that one playoffs. Possible. Your question remains, one I've pondered as well: "Is he just a secondary offensive player, or did he have some grit?" Is he a two-way line conscience good for third line duty at a higher level of competition in an all-time context, or is he an average joe on a second line for a long time? I'd like to hear more descriptions of his play and role on the team.

Someday I wanna sit in a library and go through old newspaper accounts of hockey games from over a half century ago. There used to be some very descriptive and interesting things said.

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09-03-2009, 11:53 PM
  #190
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
What a wonderful day this was!




Nine guys from my shortlists, including three and maybe four I think are main ATD worthy as role players. Definitely most could've/should've gone in the MLD.

In terms of the value of a player in an all-time context in assembling a complete team (as opposed to just an all-star game roster), this has been one of the top-3 days of the draft imo.
I'm curious as to who you see as ''fringe'' ATD'er on that list. To be honest I see none. (My 13th F was Ernie Russell for comparision sake).

Definitely some great MLD'ers though.

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09-04-2009, 12:22 AM
  #191
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Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Turco: Was definitely on my list for a backup goalie (I already have a starter) - I admit that the next 10 names in goal all blend into a mush for me. You really can't go wrong with any of them.
I think he's definitely a good starter in this draft.

3x All-Star
1x 2nd Team All-Star
2x NHL GAA Leader
2x NHL SV% Leader
5x Top-10 in Wins
5x Top-5 in GAA
3x Top-5 in SV%
Playoff Stats: 21-26, 2.17 GAA, .914 SV%
Competition: Brodeur, Luongo, Osgood, Hasek, etc.

He's also probably the best puckhandling goalie in the NHL. If he isn't the best, he's definitely one of them.

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09-04-2009, 12:26 AM
  #192
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EagleBelfour View Post
I'm curious as to who you see as ''fringe'' ATD'er on that list. To be honest I see none. (My 13th F was Ernie Russell for comparision sake).

Definitely some great MLD'ers though.
Axelsson is probably one. He isn't an ATD'er but I think he's definitely an excellent 3rd-4th liner in the MLD.

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09-04-2009, 02:08 AM
  #193
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Axelsson is probably one. He isn't an ATD'er but I think he's definitely an excellent 3rd-4th liner in the MLD.
Well, that's pretty much what I said. There are a lot of good MLD'ers on that list, but none would crack an ATD team, at least not mine.

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Old
09-04-2009, 03:26 AM
  #194
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D Jocelyn Guevremont



- 6'2", 200 lbs
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1975)
- Memorial Cup (1969, 1970)
- Played in NHL All-Star Game (1974)
- Top-10 in scoring by defensemen 4 times (4th, 8th, 8th, 10th)

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
As a junior rearguard with the Montreal Junior Canadiens from 1968 to 1971, Jocelyn Guevremont established some very impressive credentials, especially for his offensive work from the point.

The newly-formed Vancouver Canucks made the young rearguard their first-ever amateur selection in the 1971 Amateur Draft. And although he lacked defensive skills during the early going, he applied himself steadfastly to balance his game. As such, he finished his rookie campaign with a league-record 51 points, the most, up to that time, scored by a rookie.

As an offensive specialist, Guevremont continued his industrious efforts to shore up his defensive game. The results came to fruition after his trade to the Buffalo Sabres in 1974. There he succeeded in maintaining his offensive output while landing on the positive side of the plus/minus scale year in and year out.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played In the NHL
A big, strong defenseman with offensive ability...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canucks Legends
Guevremont was big at 6'2" and possessed undeniable offensive skills...

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09-04-2009, 03:54 AM
  #195
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D Bill Juzda



- 5'9", 190 lbs
- Stanley Cup (1949, 1951)
- AHL 2nd All-Star Team (1953)
- Placed 12th, 13th among NHL defensemen in scoring (1942, 1950)

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
Defenceman Bill Juzda used his 5'9" 190 lb. frame to punish opposing forwards with some of the hardest open ice hits of his era. He was not blessed with immense talent in the areas of skating and puck handling but he played his position effectively and was a difficult defender to get past.
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Originally Posted by The Leafs: An Anecdotal History
A short, blocky man who provided the Leafs with four years of obstinate defense
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Originally Posted by Hockey Towns
Among Hubbard's teammates one year was the rambunctious Bill Juzda, who'd played with the NY Rangers and the Leafs. "We called him The Beast. He could hit like nobody I've ever seen... Juzda and I played defense together. He'd get the man, and I'd get the puck."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played In the NHL
The pair (Barilko and Juzda) were regarded as the hardest hitters in the game, and proof for Juzda comes in the form of a famous photograph from the Gardens that shows Maurice Richard breaking the "unbreakable" Herculite glass, the result of a thundering Juzda check.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metro Ice
Meanwhile, Richard broke his stick over Juzda's head, snapping the shaft in two. Juzda arose slowly, like a Frankenstein moster, and tackled Richard, bringing him down violently.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame
The life and hockey career of Bill Juzda was every bit as colourful as his nickname “The Beast”. A hockey journey that began in 1938 with the Elmwood Junior Maple Leafs saw success through Junior, AHL, NHL, Intermediate and Senior levels.... Following the war he joined New Haven and was drafted by the Rangers in 1946-47. The next season he was traded to the Toronto Maple Leafs where he stayed until 1951 and won two Stanley Cups... Upon returning to Winnipeg he played for the Maroons and twice lost in the finals of the Allan Cup; once in 1955, they lost to the Penticton Vees in the western final (the Vees went on to win the World Championship). The Maroons settled for a tour of Czechoslovakia where veterans still refer to a bone-rattling body check as a “Juzda”.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuart Juzda
"He was very competitive. He was known as Rocket Richard's Anglo nemesis," ... "He was a very defensive defenceman, the old-fashioned kind. Actually, if you look at the penalty minutes, he had very few."

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09-04-2009, 04:11 AM
  #196
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G Richard Brodeur



- 5'7", 160 lbs.
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1982)
- Avco Cup (1977)
- Avco Cup Finalist (1975)
- WHA 2nd All-Star Team
- 6th in Vezina Voting (1982)
- 2nd All-time in career WHA wins
- 6th all-time in career WHA GAA
- 2nd All-time in WHA playoff wins and WHA playoff GAA (among goalies with 15+ playoff games)
- Posted .917 sv% in 1982 playoffs (cup winner Billy Smith had .899 and league average was .883)
- Career weighted playoff perseverance rating of 1.01717 (3rd in his "weight class", goalies with 1500-2500 playoff minutes - this means that he was generally outperforming other NHL goalies in the playoffs by about 17 save percentage points, give or take a few after shots against adjustments.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
...Canucks fans, and for that matter early Nordiques fans, can tell you that the stats are not truly indicative of "King" Richard Brodeur's stellar play.

Brodeur played most of his NHL career in the early to mid 1980s. Those years featured horrible Canuck teams in the same division as Wayne Gretzky's high scoring Oilers, Lanny McDonald's Calgary Flames, Marcel Dionne's LA Kings and Dale Hawerchuk's Winnipeg Jets. That's a whole lot of offensive firepower gunning at the poor Canucks, who relied on Brodeur to keep them in most games, and sometimes just to keep the score respectable.

Brodeur was, literally, the Canucks saving grace. He was an exciting goalie to watch, pretty acrobatic and had lots and lots of shots against. His career 3.85 GAA his grossly inflated by the high scoring Smythe division of the 1980s. His win/loss record is very respectable considering how bad the Canucks were in comparison to their divisional foes.

Brodeur's career highlight, like that of most Canucks and their fans of that generation, was the improbable 1982 Cinderella run to the Stanley Cup finals. Brodeur backstopped the Canucks with an 11-6 record and a 2.70 GAA. While the Canucks were lucky to have the LA Kings upset Gretzky's Oilers, The Canucks handled their opposition quite handily until they reached the Finals. Once there, the dynastic New York Islanders tore apart the Canucks, winning easily in 4 games. Dubbed "King Richard" for his fine play during the '82 playoffs, Brodeur's fine play couldn't stack up against the likes of Bryan Trottier, Denis Potvin, Clark Gillies and most noteably - Mike Bossy.

...it wasn't until the 1987-88 season that Brodeur was ousted out of that spot as the Canucks starting goalie. The arrival of a young Kirk McLean meant that Brodeur was now being asked to be a backup....

Brodeur's career actually started 8 years before he made the NHL. Drafted by the Islanders in 1972, Brodeur opted to skip out on the NHL and jump at the chance to stay in his home province by playing with the Quebec Nordiques of the World Hockey Association. Brodeur ranks as one of the best goalies in the WHA history. His 165 wins ranks second all time, only 2 wins behind Joe Daley. Brodeur also set a record for wins in 1975-76 when he had 44. That same season the Nordiques won the Avco Cup championship, symbolic of WHA supremacy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canucks Legends
During that playoff, Brodeur flipped and flopped his way into the heads of opponents and teammates alike. Opposing shooters began thinking they couldn't beat The King and his lightning-quick reflexes.... We got good goaltending and we started believing in ourselves in a really good way", adds ********. "We felt they couldn't beat us, the other teams."... The Canucks took on the Calgary Flames in round one of the playoffs, riding the red-hot netminding of Brodeur to a three-game sweep. Brodeur allowed just 5 goals on 108 shots... "In one of those games, we outshot them significantly, recalls Paul Reinhart, "I seem to remember, though, it was a case of it just didn't matter. Brodeur could have turned backwards and the puck would have hit him in the back of the leg somehow. He was that good at the time."... In the conference final against Chicago, Brodeur turned in a spectacular 46-save performance as the Canucks beat the Blackhawks and ace netminder Tony Esposito 2-1 in double OT... Brodeur stoned Hawks' superstar Denis Savard on a breakaway not long into (game 5 of the semifinals). The Canucks were outshot 38-28 but managed to pull away for a 6-2 win and a berth in the final... Brodeur played more than 50 games in six of his eight seasons and won the team MVP award three times.

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09-04-2009, 04:25 AM
  #197
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Coach Brian Kilrea



- Memorial Cup (1984, 1999)
- Memorial Cup Finalist (1977, 2001, 2005)
- J.Ross Robertson Cup (1977, 1984, 1999, 2001)
- 1193-771-153-39 in 2156 OHL games (.598)
- 1st in division in 12 of 32 seasons (9X 2nd)
- OHL Coach of the year (1981, 1982, 1996, 1997)
- CHL Coach of the year (1996)

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
Kilrea took over the coaching reins of Ottawa's junior team in 1974-75, earning his first victory on September 27, 1974 in a 9-5 victory over the Toronto Marlboros. With the exception of a two-year sojourn as assistant coach of the New York Islanders in 1984-85 and 1985-86, he has been with the 67's ever since.

In 1976-77, his third year behind the Ottawa bench, Brian took the 67's to the Memorial Cup championship after winning the league title. In 1983-84, Kilrea again led the 67's to the league title, but this time, Ottawa won the Memorial Cup as junior champions of Canada.

Throughout his twenty-nine seasons with the Ottawa 67's Kilrea has had only five losing seasons and is junior hockey's all-time winningest coach. The 67's won the league title and the Memorial Cup again in 1998-99.

The 67's won the league title again in 2000-01. In 1981, 1982, 1996 and 1997, Brian was named the OHL's coach of the year, becoming recipient of the Matt Leyden Trophy. In 1996, he was named the Canadian Hockey League's coach of the year award. On March 9, 2003, the Ottawa 67's defeated the Sudbury Wolves, giving Kilrea his 1,000th win as a coach in the OHL. The CHL honoured Brian by naming its coach of the year award the Brian Kilrea Trophy.

"When you look back on your career, you think of what you've achieved and the friends you've made, and I feel rich in both," summarizes Kilrea. "I wouldn't change a day of my life in hockey."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Loubardias
Brian Kilrea has made such a difference in so many young peoples lives. That is what he should be celebrated for first and foremost.

Ask some of his players about his influence on their lives. He not only produced better hockey players but the kids, when they left his program, were BETTER PEOPLE! He taught these kids about life and developed character while also being pressured to produce a winning squad on the ice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Branch
the statistics really only tell part of the story because Brian and his legacy will live on in terms of the people that he's touched and the positive influence he's had to the game his players and anyone that has come into contact with him.

As a coach, he's as up-to-date as anyone on Xs and Os, strategies and systems. But as a molder of men, he's something of a throwback to another era.

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Old
09-04-2009, 04:36 AM
  #198
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RW Don Saleksi



- 6'3", 205 lbs
- Stanley Cup (1974, 1975)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1976)
- A decent 30 points in 82 playoff games

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Saleski was one of the famed Broad Street Bullies. Along with Bob "Hound Dog" Kelly, Dave "The Hammer" Schultz, and "Moose" Dupont, Saleski was one of the noted goons on a team that knew no rule book. Nicknamed "Big Bird" because his wild hair reminded many of the Sesame Street character, Saleski would be sure to enter upon or create any fracas involving another Flyers player, whether it was necessary or not. Any fracas included with fans, which in 1976 got him charged in Toronto, though nothing ever came of the charges.

...Even on the ice Saleski wasn't nearly as bad as his reputation. He only had 629 PIMs in 543 NHL games, and after his first season or two he curtailed his fighting, largely because he wasn't that good at it. Schultz suggested in his autobiography by calling him " a big sonofagun who couldn't fight very well but would throw his weight around" and "he had this wild-man routine to make himself more scary than he really was."

He was a 20 goal scorer who was utilized as a shutdown winger. Often teamed with center Orest Kindrachuk, he was often assigned the task of controlling top wingers on the other team.

“I never considered myself a tough guy. I was more of an instigator. I caused a lot of problems and Dave Shultz would finish them off. I was competitive and wanted to win, so I did whatever I could to help the team,” he told philadelphiaflyers.com.

..."When I think of memories I think of the team and how we had a common vision. We supported each other and we really had this bond. We still do. I don’t see the guys that often, but when we do see each other there is the feeling of excitement. It is almost like a brotherhood.”
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Greatest Players and Moments of the Philadelphia Flyers
Saleski provided that intangible link between the Dave Schultz-Bob Kelly truculence and the high-skill performers like Rick MacLeish and Bill Barber. Plus, he was a winner. "the success Don had was due to his willingness to work," said Bobby Clarke. "He put an effort toward what he wanted and was willing to do anything to achieve his goals."... By the end of the 1974-75 season Saleski's teammates rated him the best defensive forward... "He was tireless," said Clarke. "Big, heavy, great in the corners. You didn't always notice him but he was always out there, going up and down the ice, doing his job, helping us win games."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philadelphia Flyers Encyclopedia
In later years, Saleski made the transition from a fighter to a consistent penalty killer and he could score as well. In 1976, the Flyers did not have the luxury akin to the previous two years of sweeping the first round. Instead, it was a much tougher 7-game battle with Toronto, and Saleski provided a very timely hat trick in the pivotal fifth game.

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Old
09-04-2009, 06:14 AM
  #199
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C Viktor Shuvalov



- 6'0", 190 lbs
- USSR Champion (1951, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956)
- Olympic Gold (1956)
- World Championship Gold (1954)
- World Championship Silver (1955)
- Finished 2nd, 2nd, 3rd on Russia in his three Int'l tournaments - only ever finished behind Guryshev and Bobrov
- Placed 1st, 1st, 2nd, 2nd, 4th in Russian League Scoring (1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954)
- Soviet League All-Star (1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954)
- Had 4 of his 5 top-5 seasons separate from Bobrov/Babich
- 222 goals in 150 Russian league games
- 18 goals in 22 International games

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings Of the Ice
When hockey fans think of the famous Bobrov forward line, they usually first remember Bobrov and Babich, and then recall the equally outstanding Viktor Shuvalov. Bobrov and Babich had made a name for themselves in hockey well before Shuvalov came along. But it was when Shuvalov joined the Bobrov line that it achieved the status it holds to this day. Shuvalov became the driving force behind Bobrov's troika.

Shuvalov was a leader, had strong character... Their relationship wasn't always smooth because Bobrov always demanded that the game be focused on him... Once Shuvalov understood that it was Bobrov who always drew at least two opposing players to the center line, he reconciled himself to the fact that Bobrov was the dominant member of the line.

..his style of play changed acordingly. At the beginning of an attack, Shuvalov would get Bobrov and Babich to the opposing team's goal with a series of strategic passes. If the attack folded up, Shuvalov could be counted on to back up his partners, and he frequently functioned as an offensive defenseman. he had quickly become a skillful and versatile player. Shuvalov also varied his game in front of the goal. He would position himself not right in front of the goal itself but farther back, giving the opportunity to attack and if need be, fall back and take up a defense position.

The fact that opposing teams beefed up their efforts to guard Babich and Bobrov meant Shuvalov was often left unguarded, and he lost no time taking advantage of that situation. He would fire the puck on the fly without bothering to set it up. His stability on ice was a great boon to him... with bowed legs spread wide in a low crouch he could avoid sudden bodychecks.

A hockey master is remembered by fans because of his unique abilities and individuality. This can take many forms - superb stickhandling, shots on goal, speed, and superior strategy. Viktor Shuvalov had a number of original techniques, among them his famous slapshot that flew four to six inches above the ice...Despite Bobrov's dominance, Shuvalov was a very valuable member of the famous forward line. His often dazzling and original playing style was backed up by high-scoring performances. When Shuvalov played alongside Bobrov at the WC, their scoring performances were virtually equal... He was a man who had his own views on the game, which is perhaps why he quit so early to take up coaching...

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Old
09-04-2009, 08:59 AM
  #200
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
We should consider designating a "discussion sparker" every day of the draft. One guy who has to do a review of all 14 picks of the day.
While I think this is an idea worth consideration, everything mandatory related to the draft makes it less approachable to newbies. I understand that it's quite easy for you to comment the picks because you know pretty much every player worth drafting (I guess?). I think the AAA draft should be the kind of draft where newbies (like myself) can try their wings without too much pressure and commitments.

So yes, I like the idea, but keep the draft as approachable as possible.

I liked the Stoltz-Björn pairing last time already, and still do. Key defensemen on two world championship winning teams. They probably deserve more than 3rd pairing minutes.

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