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Old
09-05-2009, 09:04 AM
  #226
Triffy
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C Raimo Helminen

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Old
09-05-2009, 09:06 AM
  #227
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C Otakar Janecky.

Janecky is a living hockey legend in Finland. The Pardubice born center was a key part of Jokerit’s success years in the 90’s when Jokerit won 4 Finnish championships. He was the most important player on those teams three of the four possible times – the best player on the first championship team was Otto’s linemate Teemu Selänne, who later next year thrashed NHL records along with Alex Mogilny. Janecky was unarguably the most important player overall during the years of success for Jokerit:

Jokerit's leading points scorers in regular season (RS) and playoffs (PO)

YearRS POTeam Result
19922nd2nd1st
19931st-DNQ
19941st1st1st
19951st1st2nd
19962ndt-1st1st
19974th*1st1st

* Suffered from injuries.

The only year Janecky wasn't Jokerit's leading playoff scorer was in 1992 when his linemate, a guy named Teemu Selänne outscored him a year before he tore NHL's rookie records apart.

Janecky was selected the best player of the playoffs in 1994 and 1997.

All in all, Janecky was arguably the best player and best playoff performer of the most competitive era in Finnish national hockey league history. From 1992 until 1997 (the time frame during which Jokerit won 4 out of the 6 possible championships), Finnish teams did extremely well in the (unofficial?) European championship tournaments.

1992 TPS did not qualify for semifinals
1993 Jokerit finished 3rd
1994 TPS finished 1st
1995 Jokerit finished 1st, TPS 3rd
1996 Jokerit finished 1st, TPS 14th
1997 HPK (don’t know why they represented Finland) didn’t qualify for semifinals.

During the 90’s Finnish elite league was considered to be the 2nd best hockey league in the world. The results support the claim. Finland also won its so far only world championship in hockey in 1995, thanks to its strong national league.

Janecky had a fairly good international career as well. He represented Czechoslovakia in the 1992 Winter Olympics, scored 7 points in 8 games as the Czechs earned bronze medals. He played at 6 big international events (WCH or Olympics) and had 32 points in 48 games.

http://www.eurohockey.net/players/sh...cgi?serial=300

Janecky's controversial championship winning goal against TPS in 1994


Janecky also had a pretty good career in Czechoslovakia. He has one assist title to his credit from his years representing HC Pardubice. The final years of his career he spent on defense, demonstrating his exceptional hockey sense.

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09-05-2009, 09:35 AM
  #228
VanIslander
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When even Russians discuss who is the third greatest Soviet goalie behind Tretiak and Konovalenko, the name that comes up in addition to Myshkin (who had a higher but shorter peak) and Puchkov (who had a longer but lower level career) is the mid-1960's to mid-1970's Spartak Moscow starter who had better international career success:

Halifax selects Viktor Zinger, Olympic gold medalist, Soviet league all-star and multiple world championship winner.



Quote:
Zinger was famous for his "butterfly" style in the net, featuring phenomenal reflexes and sense of opponents' moves.
http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1...oster/ru01.htm

Viktor Zinger played 57 international contests for the USSR and his win-tie-loss record in world championships and other international play against the only three countries to ever beat him is 27-2-5: Czechs (two losses), Swedes (two losses) and Canadians (one loss). He won five world championships (1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969), one Olympic Gold (1968) and the Soviet league all-star also won three Soviet league titles as the starter for Spartak Moscow. Later, as a 31 year old, he was the backup to young Tretiak in the '72 Summit Series and a few other tourneys in the seventies.

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Old
09-05-2009, 09:43 AM
  #229
Dreakmur
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2 nice picks guys.

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Old
09-05-2009, 10:28 AM
  #230
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Halifax selects as its backup the 1984 NCAA All-American netminder who only played six full NHL seasons, two of them great seasons, followed by a phenomenal Stanley Cup finals run for Minnesota, later winning a playoff round for Boston and St. Louis. His career may have been relatively short, but his peak was great, and his backstopping of five playoff series victories is a notable achievement, especially given four of them were amazing. He beat not only the top two teams in the standings in the 1991 playoffs but overcame the defending cup holding Oilers in the conference finals. Five postseasons later he was on fire in St. Louis, losing Game 7 of the second round to end what looked like another cup run.

Eureka! Jon Casey



1988-89 - 6th in games played (55), 2nd in save percentage (.900), 1st in ties (12)
1989-90 - 2nd in games played (61), 1st in wins (31), 2nd in shots against (1757) and 2nd in saves (1574), 3rd in points (66)
1990-91 - 6th in games played (55), then amazing Stanley Cup Finals run (14 wins)
1991-92 - 52 games played, but only 19 wins (a poor season)
1992-93 - 60 games played, 7th in goals against (193), 10th in saves (1490)
1993-94 - 57 games played, 6th in wins (30), 7th in points (69) - wins a playoff round for Boston
Then in the 1996 playoffs, after a mere 9 games as backup, he steps in and wins a playoff series for St. Louis, followed by pushing Detroit to a deciding 7th game in round 2, only to be then beaten by a Steve Yzerman goal.


Last edited by VanIslander: 09-05-2009 at 08:32 PM.
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Old
09-05-2009, 12:16 PM
  #231
Hedberg
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Toledo selects

D Pierre Bouchard


1971 Stanley Cup Champion
1973 Stanley Cup Champion
1976 Stanley Cup Champion
1977 Stanley Cup Champion
1978 Stanley Cup Champion

Legends of Hockey:
Quote:
Bouchard played his own determined brand of hockey. He put in two seasons with the Montreal Junior Canadiens from 1966 to 1968. He then turned pro in the Habs' chain, first with the Cleveland Barons and then with the Montreal Voyageurs, both of the AHL. In 1970-71, however, the Canadiens launched themselves on a rethreading project after having missed the playoffs the year before. A number of new and young faces were brought on board, including Bouchard's.

Over his first four years with the club, his ice-time was somewhat limited. With Robinson, Lapointe and Savard garnering the lion's share of action, Bouchard became a member of "the other two".

But after sharpening his game over time, Bouchard began to get more and more ice time. And although he was the team's policeman, he preferred to play it clean, handling the rough stuff only when it came knocking at his door. Otherwise, he earned his bread and butter as a rugged, stay-at-home defender in the mold of his father.

Over his eight seasons in a Habs' uniform, Bouchard savoured five Stanley Cup victories.
and LW/C Hib Milks



Legends of Hockey:
Quote:
Forward Hubert "Hib" Milks was a reliable scorer with three different NHL clubs during the 1920s and '30s. He was also an accomplished junior and senior competitor. Milks stayed in Pittsburgh when he made his NHL debut with the Pirates in 1925-26. He hit double figures in goals four out of five years.

He remained with the franchise when it relocated to Philadelphia in 1930-31. During the Quakers' horrid 4-36-4 performance, Milks was its lone bright light, scoring 17 goals. He split his last two seasons between the New York Rangers, where he played in the 1932 Stanley Cup finals, and the Ottawa Senators. He retired in 1933 after playing 16 games for the Sens.
Flyers History:
Quote:
Had the first four-goal game (and second hat trick) in Pirates history when he scored four against Toronto on March 4, 1926 … Lou E. Marsh in the December 21, 1925 Toronto Star called Milks smooth and unobtrusive, and said that “his work, while not flashy, is mighty effective” … Marsh singled out Milks as one of a select group that gave their best and played clean hockey … Also called a player who didn’t mind taking or giving a bump, excellent at the poke check, and aggressive … Hockey writers singled him out as the best of the Pirates in the team’s later years under Benny Leonard … Elected captain of the Quakers four days before the season started … Totaled 17 goals and 6 assists in 1930-31, his second-best NHL season … Started at center in the first five Quaker games, but was transferred to defense for the next eight before returning to a forward position … Scored three goals as a defenseman … Broke the Toronto Maple Leaf streak of five straight shutout games to open the season when he scored for the Quakers in the first period, contributing to Philadelphia’s 2-1 upset win … A knee injury, which reportedly occurred in the Senators’ locker room (details unknown), forced Milks to retire ... ... Worked as a ticket agent for the Canadian Pacific Railway, and as a tank inspector for the British army during World War II ... Died at age 49 on January 21, 1949.


Last edited by Hedberg: 09-05-2009 at 02:01 PM.
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Old
09-05-2009, 12:41 PM
  #232
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LW Buzz Boll
"a conscientious defensive player, often playing on a checking line"
"did everything well but nothing excellently"

"Frank "Buzz" Boll was a fast skating left-winger who demonstrated an ability to score during a career that lasted eleven full seasons. He reached double figures in goals eight times and was considered one of the most consistent players in the league."

For a consistent performer, Boll had a high peak as he led the 1936 playoffs in scoring. During his career, he ranks 19th with 263 points in 437 games. He was the only player left from the top 50. He'll fit perfectly alongside Helminen.

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09-05-2009, 01:13 PM
  #233
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RW Yuri Lebedev

Lebedev was a skilled player who will provide good scoring touch to my third line:

"had great stick handling skills"
"was described as a technically excellent player who was key to his line's offense"
"had uncanny on-ice vision and was dangerous on one-on-one situations"


Not only that, he was also a passionate, grinding winger:

"a fighting spirit behind the successes of his line"
"one of the most respected forwards in the Soviet hockey"
"After the [Summit] series, I tried to play tough all my career." - Lebedev himself
"developed into an aggressive and passionate grinder"

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Old
09-05-2009, 01:13 PM
  #234
seventieslord
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
Halifax selects as its backup the 1984 NCAA All-American netminder who only played six full NHL seasons, two of them great seasons, followed by a phenomenal Stanley Cup finals run for Minnesota, later winning a playoff round for Boston and a huge upset playoff round for St. Louis. His career may have been relatively short, but his peak was great, and his backstopping of five playoff series victories is a notable achievement, especially given four of them were amazing. He beat not only the top two teams in the standings in the 1991 playoffs but his .991 save % performance over defending cup holding Oilers in the conference finals was otherworldly. Five postseasons later he was on fire in St. Louis, losing Game 7 of the second round to end what looked like another cup run.

Eureka! Jon Casey



1988-89 - 6th in games played (55), 2nd in save percentage (.900), 1st in ties (12)
1989-90 - 2nd in games played (61), 1st in wins (31), 2nd in shots against (1757) and 2nd in saves (1574), 3rd in points (66)
1990-91 - 6th in games played (55), then amazing Stanley Cup Finals run (14 wins)
1991-92 - 52 games played, but only 19 wins (a poor season)
1992-93 - 60 games played, 7th in goals against (193), 10th in saves (1490)
1993-94 - 57 games played, 6th in wins (30), 7th in points (69) - wins a playoff round for Boston
Then in the 1996 playoffs, after a mere 9 games as backup, he steps in and wins an improbable upset playoff series for St. Louis, followed by pushing Detroit to a deciding 7th game in round 2, only to be then beaten by a Steve Yzerman goal.
I think there are a couple of factual errors in here.

- Casey allowed 11 goals against Edmonton in 4.5 games.
http://www.hockeygoalies.org/bio/casey.html
Based on that, his shots against in that series would have to be roughly 1,222 for him to have a .991 sv%. According to the above, he faced 110 shots so his sv% was exactly .900. His average for the playoffs was .893, so this would have been one of his better series of the year.... just not .991!

- Casey was outstanding in the 1996 series against the Leafs - there is no doubt about that. Fuhr was absolutely stealing the show until he got Kypreosed and well, as a Leafs fan, I can tell you we were not too concerned about Fuhr's health and absolutely giddy to be facing this "backup" goalie for the rest of the series. He wasn't quite as stellar as Fuhr but he made some excellent saves and was good enough for St. Louis to close it out. (he allowed 14 of 151 shots for a sv% of .907)Where I disagree, is where you called the series win "improbable". St. Louis had 80 points just like Toronto, but they were certainly a better team, having added Gretzky close to the deadline. Like most Leafs' series of the past 20 years, the impression I got was that they were not the better team and the other team was the one taking the play to them. That was St. Louis' series.

The Leafs that year started off 17-10-5, on pace to 100 points, it looked like everything was going just wonderfully, then everything went pear-shaped. They went into an inexplicable tailspin that resulted in pat Burns losing his job. During this spin, they made the Muller/Beaupre deal. They had to finish the season 9-6-2 to make the playoffs at all, let alone get 4th! Anything less would not have cut it. The 9th-place Ducks had two fewer points.... and one more win! So in between their excellent start and good finish, they were 8-20-5. This was a season of turmoil and deep down, we knew the team wasn't going anywhere, just like the 2008 Sens fans and 2009 Habs fans knew.

So in conclusion, I call that series win "probable".

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Old
09-05-2009, 01:36 PM
  #235
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Hib Milks is a great pick. I see a lot of Normie Himes/Jimmy Herberts in the way he carried a bad team. (Pittsburgh started off OK, then got really brutal after Worters left)

http://www.hockey-reference.com/pp/p...rder_by=points

See above. Pittsburgh was a two-man show offensively during their 5-year history.

Looks real similar to Jimmy Herberts, except minus the extra grit, with his leaderboard finishes a tad lower (Herberts had an extra top-5 and top-15 in goals, and made the top-15 in assists as opposed to just top-20) and he had one teammate who seemed to keep up with him.

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Old
09-05-2009, 04:24 PM
  #236
VanIslander
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Casey write-up corrected, thanks.

I remember him beating the Oilers in '91 and being utterly shocked but the save percentage stat I got from a North Stars tribute website when posting the write-up last night. So it's 0.900 %. It was 18 years ago and I recall my jaw dropping at saves he made, not the percentage!

Casey was a force in the NHL, and fans of other teams feared him.

Personal side story: I joined a 20-guy board draft that '91 playoffs, a real cardboard board draft, old style, where each guy pays $20 and selects ten offensive players and their names are written in ink on the board and the guy to have the most points at the end of the playoffs wins the whole jackpot. I was in college and was late joining, but convinced my college buddies to take my $20 as a late entry, they laughing at how I could possibly assemble a team AFTER they had each selected 10 players (10x10=100 players had already been drafted!). But I had noticed that they had only drafted ONE North Star. And I was a fan of the team and thought them capable of upsetting a team or two (never dreamed they'd get past Edmonton). I KNEW how good Casey was (or thought I knew, his peak being shorter and greater than I'd thought). So I drafted Modano, Broten, Bellows, Propp, and a couple of other Minnesota players, threw in Joe Mullen and Scott Young and another guy of the Penguins because Mario if healthy was going to the Finals, of that I was sure. And some Bruins player i can't recall. Anyways, I rode my ten boys al the way to the top of the standings, allll rigghhht! My college buds were amazed, impressed, but mostly pissed off and shocked. But then Mario turned it on and I lost to the guy who drafted Lemieux, Stevens, and several rounds later nabbed Janney. From 21st to 2nd in the draft. I won squat in terms of money but plenty in terms of respect. The following postseason I was invited into two extra drafts, though nothing came of them (I didn't win a hockey pool until I bet on Kolzig and the Caps to go all the way in '98).

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09-05-2009, 08:46 PM
  #237
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With their 15th and 16th picks in the 11th AAA draft, the Cumberland County Cool Blues are pleased to select first, a versatile forward capable of playing any forward position. He was a big part of a mini-dynasty in Jersey, playing a key role on both special teams through hard work and a good mind for the game, from Moscow, Russia...

Sergei Brylin

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Possessing good speed and a sound grasp of all the game's facets, centre Sergei Brylin became a valuable member of the New Jersey Devils in the late 1990s. His superior puck-handling and strength on his skates made him a versatile player for the club and an asset on both specialty teams.

The Moscow native spent three years with the Central Red Army and was drafted 42nd overall by the New Jersey Devils in 1992. He agreed to join the club in 1994-95 then spent the first half of the season playing with the AHL's Albany River Rats during the lockout shortened season. He scored 54 points in 63 games for Albany then looked solid in the last 26 games of the season for New Jersey. He then played 12 games in the post-season for the Devils when they captured their first Stanley Cup.

Over the next eight seasons, Brylin showed signs of taking his game to the next level on to regress or suffer an injury. He even spent some additional time in the AHL but returned to full time duty in 1999-00. He played solid two-way hockey all year and scored eight points while helping New Jersey win its second Stanley Cup title.

In 2003, Brylin was limited to a mere 52 games, yet was able to suit up for five post season games in helping the Devils capture their third Cup title in nine years.
Possessing good speed and a sound grasp of all the game's facets, centre Sergei Brylin became a valuable member of the New Jersey Devils in the late 1990s. His superior puck-handling and strength on his skates made him a versatile player for the club and an asset on both specialty teams.

The Moscow native spent three years with the Central Red Army and was drafted 42nd overall by the New Jersey Devils in 1992. He agreed to join the club in 1994-95 then spent the first half of the season playing with the AHL's Albany River Rats during the lockout shortened season. He scored 54 points in 63 games for Albany then looked solid in the last 26 games of the season for New Jersey. He then played 12 games in the post-season for the Devils when they captured their first Stanley Cup.

Over the next eight seasons, Brylin showed signs of taking his game to the next level on to regress or suffer an injury. He even spent some additional time in the AHL but returned to full time duty in 1999-00. He played solid two-way hockey all year and scored eight points while helping New Jersey win its second Stanley Cup title.

In 2003, Brylin was limited to a mere 52 games, yet was able to suit up for five post season games in helping the Devils capture their third Cup title in nine years.
And second, we are pleased to select Robyn Regehr-light as I like to call him. Considered one of the best defensive defenseman in the game over the past half-decade, he will make a great, rugged defense pairing with Lyle Odelein, from Port McNeil, British Columbia...

Willie Mitchell

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
A sound defenseman with some offensive upside, Mitchell enrolled at Clarkson University in the fall of 1997 and went on to play two seasons with the Goldend Knights before making his professional debut following his sophomore year. In his brief collegiate career, Mitchell recieved numerous honours including, ECAC Second All-Star Team (1998), Co-Winner ECAC Rookie of the Year (1998), ECAC First All-Star Team (1999) and NCAA East Second All-American Team (1999).

...In his first full season with the Wild in 2001-02, Mitchell registered 13 points (3-10-13) in 68 games while struggling with a plus/minus of -16. In 2002-03, Mitchell upped his point total to 14 (2-12-14) and bettered his plus/minus to a +13 while helping the Wild reach the Western Conference Finals. Following a successfull season in 2002-03, the Wild struggled in 2003-04 and missed the playoffs. Despite having his NHL season come to a premature close, Mitchell was fortunate enough to be named to Canada's gold medal World Championship team.

Following a lock-out year in 2004-05, Mitchell returned to the Wild for his fourth season with the club, where he continued to be a steady competitor on the team's blueline, however, with the club struggling somewhat, the former Clarkson star was dealt to the Dallas Stars at the trading deadline.

Following a short stint with the Stars the Port Mcneill, British Columbia native signed a four-year contract with the Vancouver Canucks.

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Old
09-06-2009, 06:00 AM
  #238
VanIslander
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Notice: Your teams can start qualifying for the playoffs.

Post the list of met time period requirements here.


1939 or earlier
1940-1965
1966-1979
1980-1989
1990-1999
in 2009

NOTE: One player cannot be used to satisfy two time periods. No 'in 2009' and '1990-99' by the same player!


Last edited by VanIslander: 09-06-2009 at 06:10 AM.
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09-06-2009, 08:00 AM
  #239
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Michigan drafts Steven Finn.



112 points in 725 games
1724 PIM

from Legends
Quote:
Steven Finn was a hard-nosed defenceman and solid team player who lasted 725 games in the NHL. His tireless work ethic and durability were assets to all three clubs on which he played.

Born in Laval, Quebec, Finn played three years with the local Voisins of the QMJHL. The two-time Quebec juniors all-star defenseman provided grit and occasional offense on a club that was led by future superstar Mario Lemieux. Finn was drafted 57th overall by the Quebec Nordiques in 1984 then went out and scored 20 goals for Laval. He began the 1985-86 season in junior but was called up to the NHL to play 17 games.

The next year he began an eight-year run as a regular on the Nords' defence brigade. As the team declined in the late 1980s, the rugged blueliner continued to play each game as though it was the seventh game of the Stanley Cup final.

The veteran blueliner was a member of the last edition of the Nordiques in 1994-95 before they moved to Colorado.

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09-06-2009, 08:01 AM
  #240
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Michigan drafts Garth Butcher.



206 points in 897 games
2302 PIM

Quote:
Butcher led all WHL defensemen with 92 points. Butcher was also a member of the first Canadian junior team to win a gold medal at the World Junior Ice Hockey Championships. Butcher scored one goal and three assists while recording no penalty minutes. Butcher recalls the gold-medal experience as his "greatest thrill" in hockey.

In the NHL Butcher became known for his defensive prowess and never matched his offensive numbers from junior.

Butcher played an aggressive style and earned a reputation as a classic "needler" who distracted opponents or provoked them into taking penalties. Butcher was not a prolific fighter but was still regarded as a tough, capable opponent.

After his retirement, the Canucks organization placed him in the sixth spot on their list of the 50 Greatest Canucks of all time.

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09-06-2009, 08:11 AM
  #241
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They were all-star defensemen in Canadian Major Juniors but more defensive skilled in the NHL. Finn made the QMJHL First All-Star Team (1984) and QMJHL Second All-Star Team (1985). Butcher:

Quote:
During his next two seasons of junior, he accumulated 178 points and over 500 minutes in penalties and was selected to the WHL's All-Star team in 1980–81. "His blend of talent and grit made him one of the top prospects" for the 1981 NHL Entry Draft.
They could handle the stick and puck but were longtime pros at taking the body.

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09-06-2009, 08:45 AM
  #242
Triffy
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D Konnie Johannesson

"He is a born defenseman and is almost unbeatable,
his ability at blocking and checking being equalled only by his quick brain
.
"
"a dangerous rusher, a gifted stick-handler, and packs a terrific shot"

Konrad "Konnie" Johannesson was a part of the gold medal winning Winnipeg Falcons team in 1920 Olympic games in Antwerp. Standing at 5' 11", he was described as "One of the giants of the team". He was clearly a very good skater as well: "The defender Johanneson became somewhat of a favorite to the public due to his marvelous skating technique."

Nothing suggests that Johannesson was a physical player, but Konnie wasn't a player who could be physically intimidated either:

"Canadian defender Johanneson at one time was pushed headlong into the barrier board, so that it was cracked. However, he happily continued to play on, as if nothing had happened."

In the moral final game played between Canada and USA, Konnie scored a decisive goal: "With a swing shot, at the same time as he fell, he succeeded in scoring - 2-0."

Sounds like Bobby Orr to me!

The defenseman possesses a rare combination of size, mobility and skill. He clearly wasn't a bad defensive player, either. Konnie will be able to get the most out of his excellent skating ability on the large ice surface used in Prague.

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09-06-2009, 09:22 AM
  #243
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RW Joe Benoit

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09-06-2009, 09:28 AM
  #244
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1939 or earlier: Jim Riley
1940-1965: Albert Langlois
1966-1979: Viktor Shalimov
1980-1989: Raimo Helminen
1990-1999: Keith Carney
in 2009: Lubomir Visnovsky

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09-06-2009, 09:51 AM
  #245
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C Raimo Helminen

Raimo Helminen is the world record holder for most international games played (331). He is also the only hockey player to have played at 6 Olympic games. Helminen was an exceptionally smart player. He was never the fastest player in the rink, but that didn't prevent him from having the career he had. He had the ability to control the pace of the game whenever he was on the ice. His career could be divided into two stages. At younger age, he was an offensive centre. As he gained more experience, he become a reliable two-way forward. Thanks to his passing skills, he always played on power play in Finland. But he was actually a very good defensive centre as well. He was the fourth line centre for Finland in Nagano and in Salt Lake City. At the 2002 Olympics, the opponents didn't manage to score a single goal when Helminen was on the ice. The 6-feet, 194 lbs center is a typical coach's favorite player: a great leader and a consistent performer.

International merits
1 x WCH Gold (1995)
5 x WCH Silver (1992, 1994, 1998, 1999, 2001)
1 x WCH Bronze (2000)
1 x Olympic Silver (1988)
2 x Olympic Bronze (1994, 1998)

In overall, 52 goals and 155 assists for a total of 207 points in 331 games.

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Old
09-06-2009, 12:06 PM
  #246
VanIslander
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Congratulatons Prague Bartenders! You are the first team to qualify for the playoffs.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Triffy View Post
1939 or earlier: Jim Riley
1940-1965: Albert Langlois
1966-1979: Viktor Shalimov
1980-1989: Raimo Helminen
1990-1999: Keith Carney
in 2009: Lubomir Visnovsky

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Old
09-06-2009, 12:14 PM
  #247
Hedberg
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Toledo selects:

G Billy Nicholson

1902 Stanley Cup Champion

Hockey Notes:
Quote:
William Nicholson was one of the fattest men ever to play hockey at the semi-professional or professional level. Originally the goalie for the Montreal AAA "Little Men of Iron" -- circa 1901 -- he has been called the first true "butterfly" goalie. He was flopping to the ice to make saves at least 10 years before Clint Benedict, the goalie who has been generally credited with pioneering the style.



Throughout most of his career Nicholson was a solid, dependable goalkeeper. He played on some poor teams, such as the 1907-08 Shamrocks and 1912-13 Toronto Tecumsehs. He rounded out his career with the Toronto Arenas in 1916-17.

The sight of Nicholson in full uniform, wearing his trademark toque and weighing anywhere from 250 to 275 pounds, must have been delicious. Apparently, whenever he crashed down onto the ice to make a save, everyone would hold their breath in fear that the ice would crack. He was surprisingly athletic, though, despite the constraints of his plus-sized frame. His career, while not of Hockey Hall of Fame caliber, compares favorably to the goaltending standard of his era.
G Marc-Andre Fleury


2009 Stanley Cup Champion

Career Playoff Record:
31-18, 2.45 GAA, .916 SV%




Last edited by Hedberg: 09-06-2009 at 12:34 PM.
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Old
09-06-2009, 12:29 PM
  #248
Leafs Forever
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Regina selects LW Pete Horeck and RW Dallas Drake

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Old
09-06-2009, 12:35 PM
  #249
Hedberg
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Toledo Walleye:
1939 or earlier: Ran McDonald
1940-1965: Dutch Reibel
1966-1979: Dale Tallon
1980-1989: Ray Sheppard
1990-1999: Ray Whitney
in 2009: Marc-Andre Fleury

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Old
09-06-2009, 12:38 PM
  #250
VanIslander
17/07/2014 ATD RIP
 
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Halifax selects Sergei Shepelev, the USSR star of Canada Cup '81 with a hat trick to blow open a tie game and put the Soviets up 4-1 on route to a 8-1 victory in what has been called Canada's most humiliating loss in hockey history. He had scored two goals and an assist to garner top star honours in an earlier victory over Czechoslovakia and went on to finish second in tourney scoring, one shy of Mike Bossy's 7, and was on the all-star team. Three years later he played a role in defeating Canada again, in Canada Cup '84, though only an early tourney victory over the eventual tourney champs, Shepelev assisting on the 1st, 2nd and 5th goals in the 6-3 win. For the three years inbetween the Canada Cups he was one of the greatest hockey players in the world. He was front and center, literally, in the Soviets' gold medal world championships in 1981, 1982, and 1983 and '84 Olympics gold, as he had been converted from his natural position of left wing to center in order to play on the national team.

Quote:
Shepelev stole all the headlines in the final game showdown of the 1981 Canada Cup. The world was watching Canada's 21 year old superstar Wayne Gretzky on a line with Guy Lafleur and Marcel Dionne, and the newly formed Russian top line of Vladimir Krutov, Igor Larionov and Sergei Makarov. But it was the anonymous Shepelev who was the game's hero, scoring three goals en route to Russia's humiliating 8-1 defeat of Team Canada.

It was Shepelev's second hat trick of the tournament. He also scored three times against Czechoslovakia, giving him a team best six tallies for the tourney. Only Canada's Mike Bossy had more.

The 26 year old Shepelev seemingly had come out of nowhere. As a younger player he was a winger with Avtomobilist Sverdlovsk who was criticized by the Russian hockey theorists who felt Shepelev was too aggressive and "too arrogant."

In 1980 he had joined Spartak Moscow where famed coach Boris Kulagin almost immediately turned him into a center. It was a seemingly odd move, given that Shepelev's lack of training as a center often troubled his defensive game and his passing, two must-have traits of centers in the Soviet system. Shepelev was a winger at heart, wanting to rush the puck and cheat offensively looking for quick breaks instead of playing high and springing the wingers.

Despite the unlikeliness of success, Kulagin captured lightning in a bottle. For a couple of years in the early 1980s Shepelev's line with Sergei Kapustin and Viktor Shalimov was as good as any line in the world. In the 1981 Canada Cup that line with unmatchable speed out-performed the KLM Line, the Gretzky-Lafleur-Dionne line and the Trottier-Bossy-Gillies line.

He was an important member of the Soviets 1981, 1982, and 1983 gold medal teams at the world championships.

Shepelev's last year with the national team was 1984, without Kapustin and Shalimov. He participated with the 1984 gold medal winning team at the Sarajevo Olympics. His last appearance with the national team came back at the Canada Cup.

All told Sergei Shepelev played in 46 games with the Soviet national team at the Olympics, Worlds and Canada Cup. He scored 22 goals and 38 points.
http://internationalhockeylegends.bl...-shepelev.html



Shepelev replaced an injured Larionov (both in pic above) on the KLM line for Red Army's Super Series NHL tour in 1985-86, and in a 6-3 win over the Stanley Cup champion Oilers, Shepelev assisted on the first goal and color commentator Howie Meeker marvels at it: "What a great, great pass."
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jeTu...eature=related (watch it here! it's a phenomenal 9 minutes from the game)

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