HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > Fantasy Hockey Talk > All Time Draft
All Time Draft Fantasy league where players of the past and present meet.

The All-Time AAA11 Thread (sign-up, roster post, picks, etc)

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
09-06-2009, 01:35 PM
  #251
VanIslander
Hockey in the blood.
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 17,339
vCash: 500
Halifax selects Vladimir Golikov, the most successful of the three hockey-playing Golikov brothers in international play, with a renowned two-way game. While he played in the 1976 and 1977 world championship losses and the '80 Olympics, his scoring was very significant when the Soviets won, in four world championship golds: in 1978 he was 3rd in goals behind Balderis and Mikhailov, in 1979 3rd in assists behind Mikhailov and Petrov, in 1981 he led the team in goals and was 2nd behind Maltsev in points, and in 1982 his 9 points were behind only Makarov, Kapustin, and Larionov. And in that 8-1 shellacking of Canada in the 1981 Canada Cup, Vladimir Golikov easily deked out Larry Robinson and backhanded the puck past Liut to score an insurance goal for the Soviets. Two years earlier in the 1979 Challenge Cup series first game, Vladimir joined Lafleur to share star of game honours after his goal in a 4-2 loss to Canada. In game two of the series against the NHL's best, Vladimir scored the game winner in a close 5-4 contest. All in all, he scored 49 points in 59 important games at the international level, thriving at the highest level of competition, not only offensively but also defensively. Clearly, in the five year span between 1978-82 he was simply one of the great hockey players on the international stage. It is almost beside the point that he finished top-3 in assists and points in the USSR league in 1978 and followed that with only three more significant seasons at the league level.



Quote:
Vladimir was an excellent two-way player with impressive defensive performance
http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1...ners/index.htm


Last edited by VanIslander: 09-06-2009 at 10:24 PM.
VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-06-2009, 01:50 PM
  #252
VanIslander
Hockey in the blood.
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 17,339
vCash: 500
Research Notes:

Sergei Shepelev was by all accounts a winger before moving from a lesser Soviet league team to the Moscow Spartak in 1980, and he is sometimes listed as a left winger, so technically he is a LW/C. He will play his more natural position of left wing on the AAA11 Halifax Eurekas but it's admitted that his newly converted position of center is where he had his international success, so it's a bit of a question mark how effective he would have been on wing in an international context, though he unquestionably had the speed, skills and hockey sense to do so.

Vladimir Golikov is a center but in a couple of places is referred to as a right winger. I believe this is a confusion with a brother of his who plays that position. Vladimir is listed at right wing also in chidlovski's listing of the best lines in seventies' hockey, but it's a shortlived line with the multipositional Maltsev, so odds are Vladimir was the pivot on that line, despite how chidlovski presents it. On this understanding, Vladimir will play center on the Halifax Eurekas' fourth line.

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-06-2009, 01:59 PM
  #253
VanIslander
Hockey in the blood.
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 17,339
vCash: 500
Congratulations Toledo Walleye! You are the second team to qualify for the playoffs.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedberg
1939 or earlier: Ran McDonald
1940-1965: Dutch Reibel
1966-1979: Dale Tallon
1980-1989: Ray Sheppard
1990-1999: Ray Whitney
in 2009: Marc-Andre Fleury

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-06-2009, 04:24 PM
  #254
Rzeznik
 
Rzeznik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Nova Scotia
Country: Canada
Posts: 439
vCash: 500
With their 19th and 20th picks in the 11th AAA draft, the Cumberland County Cool Blues are pleased to select their back-up goaltender, a first-team all-star in 2008 and a finalist for the Vezina Trophy as well, from Ust-Kamenogorsk, USSR...

Evgeni Nabokov

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Netminder Evgeni Nabokov emerged as the first stringer on the San Jose Sharks in 2000-01. A top performer in the USSR, he worked his way through the minors and became a top flight NHLer in his second year in the league.

Born in Ust-Kamenogorsk, USSR, Nabokov starred in his home town before moving on to the more heralded Dynamo Moscow squad. Chosen 219th overall by San Jose in the 1994 NHL Entry Draft, Nabokov came to North America and played solidly for the AHL's Kentucky Thoroughblades in 1997-98. The next year he counted 26 wins for the club then suited up for a few games in San Jose in 1999-00. The next year he emerged as the club's top choice between the pipes with 32 wins though the club was eliminated in the first round of the post-season.

In his first full season in with the Sharks in 2000-01, Nabokov won 32 games, posted a 2,19 GAA and went on to capture the Calder Trophy as the league's top rookie. Nabokov followed his 32 wins in 2000-01 with 37 in 2001-02 before sitting out the early stages of the 2002-03 with a contract dispute. Upon his return to the Shark lineup, Nabokov and the Sharks struggled before rebounding in 2003-04, helping his team reach the Western Conference Final, only to lose in six games to the Calgary Flames.

On the international stage, aside from representing Russia at the 2006 Winter Olympics, Nabokov also led Russia to a gold medal at the 2008 World Championships.
And second, we are proud to select our coach, a man with a career .574 regular season winning percentage, as well experience as a GM and an induction into the HHOF in the builder catagory, from North Battleford, Saskatchewan...

Emile Francis

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
When Francis took on a coaching position with the New York Rangers -sponsored Guelph Royals juniors, he began a 16-year association with that franchise. He was groomed to be the bench boss of the parent club and ended up guiding the Rangers on three separate occasions. The peak of his tenure as the New York coach was reaching the Stanley Cup finals in 1972. Francis also served as the general manager of the Blueshirts from 1964 to 1975 and drafted such future stars as Brad Park, Steve Vickers, Pat Hickey and Rick Middleton.

Francis joined the St. Louis Blues in 1976 to become Executive Vice President, general manager and coach. Under his guidance the Blues set a franchise record with 107 points in 1980-81. He joined the Hartford Whalers in 1983 as president and GM and helped the team win the Adams Division regular season crown in 1986-87. He retired from the league on June 30, 1993.

As a long time backer of minor hockey, Francis founded the New York Junior League and the St. Louis Metro Junior B League. He was a consultant to the Amateur Hockey Association of the United States, an organizer of the St. Louis hockey development schools, and the US College Resource Centre. Francis was also active in the establishment of scholarships throughout the country and was awarded the Lester Patrick trophy in 1982 for his contribution to the game in the United States.

Francis was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1982.

Rzeznik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-06-2009, 04:40 PM
  #255
Rzeznik
 
Rzeznik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Nova Scotia
Country: Canada
Posts: 439
vCash: 500
1939 or earlier: Art Jackson
1940-1965: Joe Carveth
1966-1979: Mike O'Connell
1980-1989: Mark Osborne
1990-1999: Geoff Sanderson
In 2009: Jason Spezza

Also, Curt Giles will be wearing the 'C' for the Cool Blues, while Lyle Odelein and Stephane Yelle will be wearing A's.


Last edited by Rzeznik: 09-07-2009 at 07:36 AM.
Rzeznik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-06-2009, 05:02 PM
  #256
seventieslord
Registered User
 
seventieslord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Regina, SK
Country: Canada
Posts: 23,322
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post

Personal side story: I joined a 20-guy board draft that '91 playoffs, a real cardboard board draft, old style, where each guy pays $20 and selects ten offensive players and their names are written in ink on the board and the guy to have the most points at the end of the playoffs wins the whole jackpot. I was in college and was late joining, but convinced my college buddies to take my $20 as a late entry, they laughing at how I could possibly assemble a team AFTER they had each selected 10 players (10x10=100 players had already been drafted!). But I had noticed that they had only drafted ONE North Star. And I was a fan of the team and thought them capable of upsetting a team or two (never dreamed they'd get past Edmonton). I KNEW how good Casey was (or thought I knew, his peak being shorter and greater than I'd thought). So I drafted Modano, Broten, Bellows, Propp, and a couple of other Minnesota players, threw in Joe Mullen and Scott Young and another guy of the Penguins because Mario if healthy was going to the Finals, of that I was sure. And some Bruins player i can't recall. Anyways, I rode my ten boys al the way to the top of the standings, allll rigghhht! My college buds were amazed, impressed, but mostly pissed off and shocked. But then Mario turned it on and I lost to the guy who drafted Lemieux, Stevens, and several rounds later nabbed Janney. From 21st to 2nd in the draft. I won squat in terms of money but plenty in terms of respect. The following postseason I was invited into two extra drafts, though nothing came of them (I didn't win a hockey pool until I bet on Kolzig and the Caps to go all the way in '98).
I run a draft every year, and my brother missed one for the 2006 playoffs, and wanted to do the exact same thing you did. I asked all the guys, but one objected so I had to say no. He was going to pick all oilers. I hung on to his picks anyway. and he would have won!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedberg View Post
Toledo selects:

[CENTER]G Billy Nicholson

1902 Stanley Cup Champion

Hockey Notes:
He was my top choice as a backup. Good one!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leafs Forever View Post
Regina selects LW Pete Horeck and RW Dallas Drake
Thanks LF. Please make my next one tomorrow. Turns out this campsite has wireless internet, but this will be the full extent of my use of it.

Regina has now qualified for the playoffs. Aucoin is my 2009 guy, and Drake is my 1990's guy.

see y'all later!

seventieslord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-06-2009, 05:04 PM
  #257
seventieslord
Registered User
 
seventieslord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Regina, SK
Country: Canada
Posts: 23,322
vCash: 500
Dallas Drake will be Regina's captain.

Driver, Aucoin, and Marks will be assistants.

seventieslord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-06-2009, 06:15 PM
  #258
VanIslander
Hockey in the blood.
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 17,339
vCash: 500
Please indicate captaincy on the roster post and limit it to one captain and TWO alternate captains (or go the three alternates, no captain route).

It's hard enough making comparisons. One team has more 'A's looks like has more leadership. The more we standardize format the easier it will be to compare.

Choose the best three to be 'C' and 'A' 'A'.


Last edited by VanIslander: 09-06-2009 at 10:20 PM.
VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 04:55 AM
  #259
Triffy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Helsinki
Country: Finland
Posts: 336
vCash: 500

D Joe Cooper
"one of the biggest and strongest players of his day"
"used his physical superiority whenever possible"

Cooper was also a fine player with the puck as he cracked three times the top 10 in points (8th, 8th, 9th) among defensemen.

Triffy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 05:14 AM
  #260
Triffy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Helsinki
Country: Finland
Posts: 336
vCash: 500

D Jim McKenny
"strong puckhandling and skating skills"
"known for taking many risks to promote an offensive opportunity"
"was consistently one of the team's top defenders"

Jim McKenny was a superb offensive defenseman. He cracked the top-15 in scoring by defensemen 7 times (2nd, 4th, 7th, 13th, 13th, 15th, 15th) and was the 5th highest scoring defenseman during an eight-year span (1970-1977), behind three Hall of Famers Orr, Park and Lapointe an ATD pick Vadnais.

Triffy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 05:19 AM
  #261
VanIslander
Hockey in the blood.
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 17,339
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Triffy View Post
Cooper was also a fine player with the puck as he cracked three times the top 10 in points (8th, 8th, 9th) among defensemen.
His most productive season was an NHL-depleted war year: 1944-45. DISCOUNT THAT MAJORLY.

His second most productive season was 1941-42 when he finished 12th in Blackhawks scoring with 20 points. That indeed shows he touched the puck.

Once he was 3rd in Blackhawks dmen scoring with 11 points in 44 games (again 12th in Blackhawks scoring). This shows no more than perhaps that he played on the top pairing, which would be impressive enough.

He scored 10 points two other times. To put it in perspective, the last time he was second last in team scoring, two points more than Juzda; the other time he was also second last in team scoring.

Look at his year by year numbers. You see that only a couple of times he was "fine" with the puck, if by "fine" you mean "not entirely bad".

Three top-10s in defensemen points speaks for itself in a 24+ team NHL, not back then. Look at how he does relative to teammates year by year over your career and you see he shows very little in terms of puck handling skills.

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 05:22 AM
  #262
VanIslander
Hockey in the blood.
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 17,339
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Triffy View Post
Jim McKenny.. cracked the top-15 in scoring by defensemen 7 times (2nd, 4th, 7th, 13th, 13th, 15th, 15th) and was the 5th highest scoring defenseman during an eight-year span (1970-1977), behind three Hall of Famers Orr, Park and Lapointe an ATD pick Vadnais.
This stat shows something.

Three times top-10 in dman points in the 1970s NHL means something, as does top-5 over an eight-year span.

These stats SHOW he was offensively gifted. They don't mislead.

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 05:28 AM
  #263
Triffy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Helsinki
Country: Finland
Posts: 336
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
His most productive season was an NHL-depleted war year: 1944-45. DISCOUNT THAT MAJORLY.

His second most productive season was 1941-42 when he finished 12th in Blackhawks scoring with 20 points. That indeed shows he touched the puck.

Once he was 3rd in Blackhawks dmen scoring with 11 points in 44 games (again 12th in Blackhawks scoring). This shows no more than perhaps that he played on the top pairing, which would be impressive enough.

He scored 10 points two other times. To put it in perspective, the last time he was second last in team scoring, two points more than Juzda; the other time he was also second last in team scoring.

Look at his year by year numbers. You see that only a couple of times he was "fine" with the puck, if by "fine" you mean "not entirely bad".

Three top-10s in defensemen points speaks for itself in a 24+ team NHL, not back then. Look at how he does relative to teammates year by year over your career and you see he shows very little in terms of puck handling skills.
At first I was going to use a word "decent". But "fine" sounds quite similar to me.

Regardless of the word choices, Cooper will be paired with an offensive defenseman, probably Visnovsky, who will be responsible for the offensive contributions of the pair. I don't want him to rush the puck up the ice. But, as the statistics indicate, Cooper was more than capable of giving an easy first pass. He's not as offensively limited as the descriptions of him could make you believe.

I picked him because of his defensive abilities and the physical dimension. But I don't want my players to be completely useless with the puck. Cooper's 3 top-10 finishes prove that he was not.

Triffy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 05:53 AM
  #264
VanIslander
Hockey in the blood.
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 17,339
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Triffy View Post
He's not as offensively limited as the descriptions of him could make you believe.

I picked him because of his defensive abilities and the physical dimension. But I don't want my players to be completely useless with the puck. Cooper's 3 top-10 finishes prove that he was not.
No they do not prove any such thing!!!

HE WAS COMPLETELY USELESS WITH THE PUCK his first season with 3 points in 48 games.
HE WAS COMPLETELY USELESS WITH THE PUCK his second full season with 5 points, the worst among all team starters, the next worst was 12 points by a defensive winger.
HE WAS COMPLETELY USELESS WITH THE PUCK his third full season with only one skater worse over the season (though Earl Seibert had one less point in 12 less games played).
HE WAS COMPLETELY USELESS WITH THE PUCK his fourth full season with again just one skater worse than him in points over the season, Cooper getting 10 and the next worst was 17 (even Seibert got 20 this season).
He had ONE season of significant numbers in 1941-42 when his 20 points were much better than two other dmen on the team and not far off the two dmen ahead of him on the team.
He had a fantastic huge asterix season in 1944-45 the depleted war year when he was one of only four Blackhawks to play a full season.
HE WAS COMPLETELY USELESS WITH THE PUCK his seventh full season, finishing one point ahead of the worst producing skater on the team, Reg Hamilton.
HE WAS COMPLETELY USELESS WITH THE PUCK his eighth and last full NHL season, with the Rangers, two points ahead of least point producing skater, Juzda.

Joe Cooper is not a puck skilled defenseman. And the two war years production (of which only one is significant, 1941/42 when players hadn't left en masse and when most players still played a full season) means nothing in an ALL-TIME context.

Joe Cooper was "one of the biggest and strongest players of his day, and he used his physical superiority whenever possible". He was there to HIT, to check his man along the boards and behind the net and play defensively.

You need more than a misleading stat to show otherwise (sorry, a pet peeve).

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 06:34 AM
  #265
Triffy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Helsinki
Country: Finland
Posts: 336
vCash: 500
You're probably right. I may have overvalued his 3 top-10 finishes. There were 6-8 teams in the league during his time. Finishing 8th in the O6 days means that you were 8th best of the 24 (or 36?) regularly playing defensemen. So he wasn't a number one d-man in any of the teams, but was a pretty good #2. Offensively. And he was at that level 3 times. I haven't done proper research regarding the value of d-men's top 10 finishes in different eras. So I'm not an expert, but to me, that sounds like he was - for a defensive, hard hitting defenseman - an above average offensive player as well.
Quote:
He was there to HIT, to check his man along the boards and behind the net and play defensively.
That's the role he'll be used on my team as well. And, using the top-10 finishes as an evidence, he will not get into trouble everytime someone forechecks him a bit more aggressive than usually.

If I'm mistaken and the 3 top-10 finishes is actually a normal (below-average) resume for a defensive defenseman from his days, please enlighten me.


Last edited by Triffy: 09-07-2009 at 06:41 AM.
Triffy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 08:00 AM
  #266
VanIslander
Hockey in the blood.
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 17,339
vCash: 500
Michigan drafts coach Ron Wilson.

552 wins
7th all-time in wins
1 Stanley Cup Finals
1996 World Cup coach winner



1996, 2004 World Cup coach
1998, 2010 Olympics coach



Quote:
In his first year in Washington, he led the team to the Stanley Cup Finals, where the Capitals were defeated by the Detroit Red Wings in four games. He also coached the U.S. national team again, this time at the 1998 Winter Olympics.

In the 1999–00 and 2000–01 seasons, Wilson led the team to back-to-back Southeast Division titles, though the team failed to advance past the first round of the playoffs both times.

In his four seasons coaching at San Jose, he led the Sharks to the Western Conference finals in 2004 and became the 13th coach to coach 1,000 NHL games on March 18, 2007. With the elimination of the Sharks in the 2007 Playoffs by the Detroit Red Wings, Wilson became the first coach in NHL postseason history to lose to the same team with three different franchises.

Wilson was given the role of assistant coach for the NHL All-Star Game for the Western Conference team after guiding the Sharks to a record of 22-13-5 in the opening half of the 2007–08 NHL season. The Sharks improved that record to 27-15-7 at the time of the All-Star Game. This was Wilson’s coaching debut in an All-Star Game in the fourteen years that he has coached in the NHL.

Wilson is 11th on the all-time list of the number of games coached, and is ranked third amongst the active coaching list.[3]

Wilson earned his 500th win of his coaching career when the Sharks beat the Nashville Predators 4-3 on February 9, 2008, at HP Pavilion at San Jose. He is the 11th coach in the history of the NHL to reach 500 victories.[4]

On March 1, 2008, Wilson became the coach with most wins in Sharks franchise history with 193 wins, and passed Darryl Sutter, who held the earlier record of 192 wins.

Wilson was named the coach of the U.S. national team at the 1996 World Cup of Hockey, where he led the Americans to the tournament championship.

In April 2009 he was named the head coach for the U.S. Olympic hockey team.

As a coach, Wilson is well-known for integrating technology into his coaching plans. During his stint with the Washington Capitals, he and his assistant coach introduced personal computers into the team's strategy planning and burned DVDs of Capitals games for the team to review. In his stint with the San Jose Sharks, Wilson introduced a tablet PC to be used in the team bench by himself or his assistants to instantly plan out strategies and review plays.

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 08:02 AM
  #267
VanIslander
Hockey in the blood.
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 17,339
vCash: 500
Michigan drafts Mike McEwen.

404 points in 716 games
1980 All-Star Game



48 playoff points
3 Stanley Cups

from Legends
Quote:
Mike McEwen was a talented offensive defenceman who played over 700 NHL games in the 1970s and '80s. He was a fine passer with an accurate shot.

Born in Hornepayne, Ontario, McEwen was chosen 42nd overall by the New York Rangers in the 1976 Amateur Draft after a stellar junior career with the Toronto Marlboros. The gifted youngster accumulated 181 points in three years and helped the team win the Memorial Cup in 1975.

During the 1976-77 season, McEwen impressed as a rookie with 43 points. Two years later, he scored a personal-high 20 goals and helped the Blueshirts reach the Stanley Cup finals. The next year, he was part of the package sent to the Colorado Rockies for star blueliner Barry Beck. McEwen provided an instant upgrade to the club's mobility on defense but he clashed repeatedly with coach Don Cherry who disliked his attitude.

McEwen was granted a release from the Rockies' tumultuous situation when he was sent to the New York Islanders in the deal that involved popular netminder Chico Resch. He provided offensive savvy and mobility on the blueline and was part of three straight Stanley Cup wins on Long Island (1981, 1982, 1983). Through the rest of his career, he was an offensive sparkplug on the L.A. Kings, Washington Capitals , Detroit Red Wings, and Hartford Whalers. In 1986, he was a factor when the club came within a game of reaching the semi-finals for the first time in franchise history.

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 08:07 AM
  #268
Rzeznik
 
Rzeznik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Nova Scotia
Country: Canada
Posts: 439
vCash: 500
With their 21st and 22nd picks in the 11th AAA draft, the Cumberland County Cool Blues are pleased to select first, the final piece to their third line and completion of the GEM line from the late 80's Maple Leafs, from Toronto, Ontario, right winger...

Gary Leeman

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
A speedy right-winger with soft hands, Gary Leeman played nearly 700 NHL games for five different clubs. He was best known as a gritty scoring machine on the Toronto Maple Leafs with a 50-goal season to his credit.

The Toronto native attended Notre Dame College in Wilcox, Saskatchewan and was a standout defenceman for two seasons with the WHL's Regina Pats. He was chosen 24th overall by the Toronto Maple Leafs in the 1982 Entry Draft and then returned to junior where he scored 86 points in 63 games. Leeman also represented Canada at the World Junior Championships in 1983 and joined the Maple Leafs for two playoff games that spring. Following the season the gifted youngster was placed on the WHL first all-star team.

Leeman scored 12 points as a rookie in 1983-84 and was loaned by Toronto to Team Canada for the World Junior Championships. By the 1985-86 season, Leeman started to use his speed and shot more effectively. He formed the "Hound Line" with Wendel Clark and Russ Courtnall while helping the Leafs come within a game of the semi-finals.

Beginning in 1986-87, Leeman was a top goal scorer for the club with four-straight 20-goal seasons. In 1988-89, he scored 32 goals and was picked to play in the NHL All-Star Game. In 1989-90, he formed the potent "GEM Line" with Ed Olczyk and Mark Osborne and became the second Toronto player after Rick Vaive to register a 50-goal season. He dropped to 17 goals the next season when his effectiveness was reduced by a shoulder separation.

By the 1991-92 season, Leeman needed a change of scenery and was the key player sent to Calgary in the blockbuster trade that brought Doug Gilmour to Toronto. Leeman never discovered his scoring touch in Calgary, Montreal, Vancouver, or St. Louis in the ensuing years.
He did, however, win a Cup with the Canadiens in a bottom-6 role.

Second, we are pleased to select a strong two-way center who could skate and play physical. 4-time 50 assist getter, he also could be effective on both special teams, from Kladno, Czechoslovakia...

Michal Pivonka

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Michal Pivonka first caught the attention of NHL scouts as a result of his standout performance at the 1983 European Junior Championships where he was named to the tournaments all-star team. He kept up his stellar play at World Junior tournaments in 1985 and 1986, winning a gold medal in the latter outing.

He was selected 59th overall in the 1984 NHL Entry Draft by the Washington Capitals. Pivonka expressed a strong interest in defecting to the NHL but insisted on completing his required military service before making the jump.

He joined the Caps in 1986-87 and filled an important void created by the retirement of Bengt Gustafsson. Pivonka centred a line between Bobby Gould and Gatean Duchesne, making a good impression from the start with his strong skating, excellent passing, and willingness to play physically.

Pivonka remained as a fixture with the Caps for 12 seasons. By the early nineties, fellow countryman Petr Bondra joined the club, uniting with Pivonka to make an effective offensive duo. In tandem, they raised each other's game with Pivonka scoring a career- high 80 points in 80 games during the 1991-92 campaign...

Rzeznik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 08:10 AM
  #269
VanIslander
Hockey in the blood.
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 17,339
vCash: 500
Michigan Wolverines

1939 or earlier ... Marty Burke
1940-1965 ... Dave Creighton
1966-1979 ... Mike McEwen
1980-1989 ... Randy Burridge
1990-1999 ... Glen Murray
in 2009 ... Todd Marchant

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 08:52 AM
  #270
VanIslander
Hockey in the blood.
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 17,339
vCash: 500
Halifax selects Alexander Skvortsov, a Soviet winger whose international peaks weren't as brilliant as those of Shepelev and Golikov, but whose career outlasted both of the others in terms of years on the national team and goal production in the Soviet league. He has 292 career goals overall, the most among undrafted Soviets, and his Soviet league goal total of 244 is only ten shy of Bobrov's, 21st all time. He had three remarkable seasons in the eighties in which just two or three players significantly outscored him in the Soviet top league. His production is as surprising as his tenure on the national team, as he came from the unlikely team Torpedo Gorky, whereas most national team members played for the Red Army or at least a Moscow based team. He was on the Canada Cup '76 squad and then not again until in 1979 he led a group of B-rated Soviet "All-stars" in goal scoring in a 6-game tour against the WHA, notching a team-leading four goals. He was selected to play on the A-team of Soviets against the NHL All-Stars in the three-game '79 Challenge Cup series and had two assists in three games. He scored 45+ points in about 70 sanctioned international tourneys between 1979-85 (records are spotty), including World Championship gold medal wins in 1979, 1981 and 1983, the '81 Canada Cup victory in which he scored the 8th goal against Canada on a breakaway that Liut barely moved to try and save, it being such a humiliating defeat 8-1. Skvortsov knows what that's like, having played in the '80 Olympics, though redemption came in the gold medal he won as part of the '84 Olympics team.



Last edited by VanIslander: 09-07-2009 at 09:36 AM.
VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 08:57 AM
  #271
Leafs Forever
Registered User
 
Leafs Forever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,781
vCash: 500
Regina selects goaltender Frank McCool and spare John Mayasich

Leafs Forever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 09:15 AM
  #272
VanIslander
Hockey in the blood.
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 17,339
vCash: 500
Halifax also selects to be an extra skater the HHOF great amateur left winger George Richardson. He was a prolific scorer who won intercollegiate titles (1903, 1904, 1906), the OHA Senior title (1908) and the Allan Cup (1909). He was a two-time SOHA First Team All-Star (1907, 1908) and had scored three goals in Queen's 1906 Stanley Cup challenge loss, second most on the team to fellow HHOFer Marty Walsh. He died in the Great World War of 1914-1918 and is remembered as "a hero in sport and war", as the Toronto Telegram put it.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Honoured Members
Richardson was considered a great hockey player on many counts. He was a fine stickhandler and a powerful skater, and he possessed a hard shot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
... an outstanding amateur hockey player... a clean, gentlemanly player, a fine stickhandler, and prolific scorer. He scored five times against Princeton University in New York and was prominent against Yale University as Queen's won the intercollegiate title of America in 1903. Queen's was also the Intercollegiate Hockey Union champions in 1904 and 1906.

Richardson starred at left wing for the 14th Regiment of Kingston hockey team that went on to the Ontario Hockey Association finals three consecutive years from 1907 to '09. He posted a record seven-goal game as Kingston won the OHA Senior crown, 9-7 over Stratford, in 1908.

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 09:24 AM
  #273
VanIslander
Hockey in the blood.
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 17,339
vCash: 500
Congratulations Cumberland County Cool Blues! You are the third team to qualify for the playoffs.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Rzeznik View Post
1939 or earlier: Art Jackson
1940-1965: Joe Carveth
1966-1979: Mike O'Connell
1980-1989: Mark Osborne
1990-1999: Geoff Sanderson
In 2009: Jason Spezza

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 09:25 AM
  #274
VanIslander
Hockey in the blood.
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 17,339
vCash: 500
Congratulations Michigan Wolverines! You are the fourth team to qualify for the playoffs.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Zamboni Mania View Post
1939 or earlier ... Marty Burke
1940-1965 ... Dave Creighton
1966-1979 ... Mike McEwen
1980-1989 ... Randy Burridge
1990-1999 ... Glen Murray
in 2009 ... Todd Marchant

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-07-2009, 09:27 AM
  #275
VanIslander
Hockey in the blood.
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 17,339
vCash: 500
Congratulations Halifax Eurekas! Mine is the fifth team to qualify for the playoffs.



Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
1939 or earlier George Richardson
1940-1965 Chico Maki
1966-1979 Bob Kelly
1980-1989 Jon Casey
1990-1999 Petr Sykora
in 2009 Jason Arnott

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:26 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. ©2014 All Rights Reserved.