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My 7 year olds development

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Old
08-19-2009, 05:36 PM
  #26
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Originally Posted by JFA87-66-99 View Post
They tournaments for 7 year olds? What is the super 7's?
There quite a few AAA youth Tournaments in Manitoba. Last year Portage had one for 6 year olds, 7s, 8s, 9s. Brandon and Winnipeg each had multiple tournaments for 7s, 8s 9s etc.
These tournaments start in April and run through June.
The tournament that Vivian refers to is the Mustang Wish Tournament which would probably be classified as a AA tournament. A great tournament non the less!

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08-20-2009, 11:00 AM
  #27
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My son starting skating at 3 and playing @ 4. He just finished up his 1st year of playing AAA Spring/Summer league (a year up) and had a blast playing the AAA all star teams from Montreal, Quebec and Ontario (they actually beat the Ontario team !! - not bad for a "southern" team) He's a 2001, just turned 8

I would agree with OCanada....and if he loves it, let him go...but you have to watch the burnout and try doing ANYTHING else in the off season (maybe just some public skates etc)

I'd also add - head up to see the play, passing and not going coast to coast, hand speed around the net esp....and practice backwards skating and backhands.....

Seems the "elite" players can do all of that and then some...

Have fun !!

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10-14-2009, 09:50 PM
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Just wanted to update some of you that really tried to help out....

Like I said my son has only been skating a year, but he worked really hard at it and he made the select 7 team it's the third team but he has never played house so it was a pretty big jump for him, right now hes one of the top 3 players on the team, I really appreciate the tips please keep them coming. You guys really helped out.

Thanks again

Please provide more insight as I have never played the sport myself so dont really know what to work on with him.

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10-14-2009, 11:19 PM
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by happyhab View Post
Just wanted to update some of you that really tried to help out....

Like I said my son has only been skating a year, but he worked really hard at it and he made the select 7 team it's the third team but he has never played house so it was a pretty big jump for him, right now hes one of the top 3 players on the team, I really appreciate the tips please keep them coming. You guys really helped out.

Thanks again

Please provide more insight as I have never played the sport myself so dont really know what to work on with him.
Congratulations on your son's success. Here's an addition and my two cents....

Every Spring after the hockey season ends, get him into every power skating class or clinics each year until he becomes a junior. And during every hockey season, just be a supportive parents and tell him how wonderful he is doing and let the coach do his job.

Too many times a childs growth becomes stagnant because the child doesn't know which one to listen too...Dad or the Coach!

However, if you want to coach your child, I recommend that you start taking some coaching certification programs and get on the ice. If not, i recommend that you just sit in the stands and be a supportive dad that tells him on the drive home, that he is doing a great job. Don't be negative, that's not what he's going to want to hear. Let the coach be negative. Let the coach be the one to tell him what he needs to work on. You provide him with the positive attitude that if he works hard, he can go anywhere.

You do this and you will develop a great hockey player. Criticize his game and he will just shut down and maybe quit or hate the game. After 30 years of coaching, I have seen this too many times.

Head coach

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10-14-2009, 11:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Headcoach View Post
Congratulations on your son's success. Here's an addition and my two cents....

Every Spring after the hockey season ends, get him into every power skating class or clinics each year until he becomes a junior. And during every hockey season, just be a supportive parents and tell him how wonderful he is doing and let the coach do his job.

Too many times a childs growth becomes stagnant because the child doesn't know which one to listen too...Dad or the Coach!

However, if you want to coach your child, I recommend that you start taking some coaching certification programs and get on the ice. If not, i recommend that you just sit in the stands and be a supportive dad that tells him on the drive home, that he is doing a great job. Don't be negative, that's not what he's going to want to hear. Let the coach be negative. Let the coach be the one to tell him what he needs to work on. You provide him with the positive attitude that if he works hard, he can go anywhere.

You do this and you will develop a great hockey player. Criticize his game and he will just shut down and maybe quit or hate the game. After 30 years of coaching, I have seen this too many times.

Head coach

I still think allowing a kid to play hockey all year round is the worst thing parents do. (yes im including power skating classes in "playing hockey")

Let the kid play baseball or soccer or whatever. Hell, there is a good chance he wont play Juniors. And being involved in hockey all year round is the best way to get your kid to NOT enjoy hockey any more.

Anything hockey related leave in the Winter, let him play other sports in the summer.

After 24 years of playing, I have seen this too many times.

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10-15-2009, 01:17 AM
  #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CanadaBacon View Post
I still think allowing a kid to play hockey all year round is the worst thing parents do. (yes im including power skating classes in "playing hockey")

Let the kid play baseball or soccer or whatever. Hell, there is a good chance he wont play Juniors. And being involved in hockey all year round is the best way to get your kid to NOT enjoy hockey any more.

Anything hockey related leave in the Winter, let him play other sports in the summer.

After 24 years of playing, I have seen this too many times.
Hum, does this advice come from a pro hockey player? The difference between an amateur and a pro is 6" between ones ears. An amateur look for ways not to complete the task, while pros looks for ways to do things other won't do.

I am not say you are not a pro. In fact you are probably really good at what you do. In fact, most professionals come in all shapes and sizes and they all come in different fields.

I truly believe that if a kid wants to make it to the professional status of a pro hockey player, he's going to have to do things that the average player will not do. The way to become a pro is to stand out from the rest. This means putting in extra time and doing things that that most people won't do because of one excuse or another. Example: Do I go out with my friends tonight and go goof off? Or do I go work on things that will help me get ahead and make me a better hockey player?

Should I go and do what other won't do? or should I do what everyone else is doing and then say 10 years from now...If I had only!

The cool thing is, most people don't know what it takes to make a commitment to one craft and that's ok. Not everyone can be good at what they do. If that was the case, everyone would be playing in the NHL. But in order to really be there and make it to the lifting of the cup, one has to really be hungry. Hungry in a way that when you are that hungry, nothing stops you from eating or drinking. That's the kind of commitment it takes.

It's easy to fail. It's all around us. There is always somebody out there that will tell you...you can't make it, or it's too hard. If fact, the human mind will do this for you. When things start getting taught, we will find ways to make it ok in our minds to fail. We will convince ourselves that this task or this direction is the wrong way or this must not be right because it's too hard.

This is the time when one needs a support group or person that will tell us that we can succeed, that we can do it. This is the person that one needs in ones life. Not the person that says...oh it's ok, and I know it's hard, it's ok to fail.

In order to succeed, you will need someone who will tell you to shut up and stop crying and get your a** in gear. That you can get anything in life as long as you overcome those walls that say that you can't!

Head coach

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10-15-2009, 01:30 AM
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Headcoach View Post
Hum, does this advice come from a pro hockey player? The difference between an amateur and a pro is 6" between ones ears. An amateur look for ways not to complete the task, while pros looks for ways to do things other won't do.

I am not say you are not a pro. In fact you are probably really good at what you do. In fact, most professionals come in all shapes and sizes and they all come in different fields.

I truly believe that if a kid wants to make it to the professional status of a pro hockey player, he's going to have to do things that the average player will not do. The way to become a pro is to stand out from the rest. This means putting in extra time and doing things that that most people won't do because of one excuse or another. Example: Do I go out with my friends tonight and go goof off? Or do I go work on things that will help me get ahead and make me a better hockey player?

Should I go and do what other won't do? or should I do what everyone else is doing and then say 10 years from now...If I had only!

The cool thing is, most people don't know what it takes to make a commitment to one craft and that's ok. Not everyone can be good at what they do. If that was the case, everyone would be playing in the NHL. But in order to really be there and make it to the lifting of the cup, one has to really be hungry. Hungry in a way that when you are that hungry, nothing stops you from eating or drinking. That's the kind of commitment it takes.

It's easy to fail. It's all around us. There is always somebody out there that will tell you...you can't make it, or it's too hard. If fact, the human mind will do this for you. When things start getting taught, we will find ways to make it ok in our minds to fail. We will convince ourselves that this task or this direction is the wrong way or this must not be right because it's too hard.

This is the time when one needs a support group or person that will tell us that we can succeed, that we can do it. This is the person that one needs in ones life. Not the person that says...oh it's ok, and I know it's hard, it's ok to fail.

In order to succeed, you will need someone who will tell you to shut up and stop crying and get your a** in gear. That you can get anything in life as long as you overcome those walls that say that you can't!

Head coach

Not pro in the way you are impling, but pro as in have earned a pay check.

The chances of any kid going pro is slim to none, why drain the love of the game out of them. This is a 7 year old ffs. IF at 12-13-14 ,and there maybe a chance they can play Jr/MJ, then yes summer sessions will be good for development to make the next level. But this is a kid, why would anyone put this on a kid. Let them be a kid instead of "preparing them" to be a pro.

What does going out and "goofing" off at night have anything to do with playing other sports in the summer?

This is a 7 year old, why the hell are you talking about the NHL? What the hell are you taking about "failure" for?

With the attitude you have when dealing with a 7 year old, YOU are the reason so many kids loss the love of the game. YOU are the reason kids who have the natural talent to make it to the next level quit because it is no longer fun.


EDIT: Bah... i got a little heated there, with no offense intended, i believe your view and attitude to this situation is wrong.


Last edited by CanadaBacon: 10-15-2009 at 02:02 AM.
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10-15-2009, 09:17 AM
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Interesting pov from both CanadianBacon and HeadCoach, what I sincerly believe is that if my son loves it and wants it than I'm there for him.

I love my kid to death and refuse to say anything negative to him, and just support him in every way, but after a game we both discuss how it went, and a typical conversation will go like " that was an awesome backcheck, I loved how you came back on that play" or " son try to anticipate where the puck is going to go, but you played great"

CanadianBacon I do agree with you I definitly put my son in soccer over the summer or maybe ballhockey, but you have to understand headcoach aswell, the summer is very long they have 2 months, 24 hours in the day, if they spent 1 hour power skating a day, 1 day a week playing soccer and 1 day a week playing ball hockey it's actually good for them. They is still more than enough time to do whatever they want.

Last summer my son couldn't wait for his ball hockey or soccer game, cause the summer gets pretty boring for them. Keeping there body, and mind active is the goal, especially over the summer.

at the end of all this the summer is just to long not to put a bunch of activities there. If they love to skate why take it away let them go learn more, but also soccer or baseball or drum classes. Keep them busy so they learn to be effiecient, trust me as a teacher by profession this is what the kids nowadays need.

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10-15-2009, 09:44 AM
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I normally and iin agreement with HeadCoach but think I have to lean towards CB on this one, with a little HC thrown in. Most coaching clincis these days are advocating building a better ATHLETE, not just a better hockey player. A better athelete by all accounts will make a better hockey player. What in the world do they mean by this? Well, I'm glad you asked

Allowing a child to play other sports in the hockey off season will help build other muscle groups and other skill that may actually translate well to the ice. For example, soccer will help build foot speed/quick feet as well as balance which are both necessary in hockey. Baseball will help buiild eye/hand coordination which is also necessary in hockey. Furthermore, keeping him away from the rink for small periods of time will prevent burnout and help build anticipation.

Now, I am not going so far as to walk away from the rink in April and don't come back untl August/September - just don't live there as you do in season. Sign up for maybe one power skating class and one really good weeklong clinic. Then, let your son help dictate the amount of time he wants to spend he actually wants to spend in the rink vs. playing other sports during the offseason.

Remember, a better ATHLETE makes a better hockey player.

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10-15-2009, 11:25 AM
  #35
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I normally and iin agreement with HeadCoach but think I have to lean towards CB on this one, with a little HC thrown in. Most coaching clincis these days are advocating building a better ATHLETE, not just a better hockey player. A better athelete by all accounts will make a better hockey player. What in the world do they mean by this? Well, I'm glad you asked

Allowing a child to play other sports in the hockey off season will help build other muscle groups and other skill that may actually translate well to the ice. For example, soccer will help build foot speed/quick feet as well as balance which are both necessary in hockey. Baseball will help buiild eye/hand coordination which is also necessary in hockey. Furthermore, keeping him away from the rink for small periods of time will prevent burnout and help build anticipation.

Now, I am not going so far as to walk away from the rink in April and don't come back untl August/September - just don't live there as you do in season. Sign up for maybe one power skating class and one really good weeklong clinic. Then, let your son help dictate the amount of time he wants to spend he actually wants to spend in the rink vs. playing other sports during the offseason.

Remember, a better ATHLETE makes a better hockey player.

^^^He explained it better then i did. Great post.

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10-15-2009, 11:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by happyhab View Post
Interesting pov from both CanadianBacon and HeadCoach, what I sincerly believe is that if my son loves it and wants it than I'm there for him.

I love my kid to death and refuse to say anything negative to him, and just support him in every way, but after a game we both discuss how it went, and a typical conversation will go like " that was an awesome backcheck, I loved how you came back on that play" or " son try to anticipate where the puck is going to go, but you played great"

CanadianBacon I do agree with you I definitly put my son in soccer over the summer or maybe ballhockey, but you have to understand headcoach aswell, the summer is very long they have 2 months, 24 hours in the day, if they spent 1 hour power skating a day, 1 day a week playing soccer and 1 day a week playing ball hockey it's actually good for them. They is still more than enough time to do whatever they want.

Last summer my son couldn't wait for his ball hockey or soccer game, cause the summer gets pretty boring for them. Keeping there body, and mind active is the goal, especially over the summer.

at the end of all this the summer is just to long not to put a bunch of activities there. If they love to skate why take it away let them go learn more, but also soccer or baseball or drum classes. Keep them busy so they learn to be effiecient, trust me as a teacher by profession this is what the kids nowadays need.

Ball hockey and soccer is great for the summer. It sounds like you are doing a great job.

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10-16-2009, 03:08 PM
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Congrats HappyHab! When you say he made the 7 year old select team, are you meaning he made a spring team or a winter team?

CanadaBacon, you have to remember that extended spring hockey in Manitoba for 7 year olds is NOT all summer! It ends in June and is NOT every weekend etc. There is still lots of opportunities for kids to play other sports.

I do however agree that the its a good idea for the kids to come back to the rink hungry for the start of the winter hockey season as it is a long one. At a young age I will not let my son play "all summer long" as I feel it will do him good to take a break and enjoy other sports but that doesnt stop him from practicing in the basement!

Once again, congrats HappyHab. You sound like a great supportive hockey dad that is truly interested and supportive of your childs play! That makes for one heck of a fun time watching him! He will only get better with support like that!

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10-16-2009, 03:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by happyhab View Post
Just wanted to update some of you that really tried to help out....

Like I said my son has only been skating a year, but he worked really hard at it and he made the select 7 team it's the third team but he has never played house so it was a pretty big jump for him, right now hes one of the top 3 players on the team, I really appreciate the tips please keep them coming. You guys really helped out.

Thanks again

Please provide more insight as I have never played the sport myself so dont really know what to work on with him.
Work on skating, balance and agility! To me those are the most important components a young hockey player can have.

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10-16-2009, 05:02 PM
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Year round training is okay if it's limited. Like a game or practice once or twice a week during the spring and summer. But a lot of guys who make it to the pros were spectacular at other sports as well. Former Atlanta Braves pitcher Tom Glavine was taken in the 4th round of the NHL draft by the Kings, and I just recently learned Joe Nieuwendyk was a phenomenal lacrosse player. I have no idea if this relates to the OP but it's just something I wanted to harp on.

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10-16-2009, 10:37 PM
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Congrats HappyHab! When you say he made the 7 year old select team, are you meaning he made a spring team or a winter team?

CanadaBacon, you have to remember that extended spring hockey in Manitoba for 7 year olds is NOT all summer! It ends in June and is NOT every weekend etc. There is still lots of opportunities for kids to play other sports.

I do however agree that the its a good idea for the kids to come back to the rink hungry for the start of the winter hockey season as it is a long one. At a young age I will not let my son play "all summer long" as I feel it will do him good to take a break and enjoy other sports but that doesnt stop him from practicing in the basement!

Once again, congrats HappyHab. You sound like a great supportive hockey dad that is truly interested and supportive of your childs play! That makes for one heck of a fun time watching him! He will only get better with support like that!

That really has nothing to do with what i was saying. HC said to sign the kid up in every power skating school/clinic he could. I disagreed. It was pretty straight forward.

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10-17-2009, 06:25 AM
  #41
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LOL, anytime some one mentions there kid playing on a AAA hockey team in the off season you automatically come back with the
Quote:
I still think allowing a kid to play hockey all year round is the worst thing parents do.
comment.
I am just again pointing out that it is not all summer long.
Cheerio!

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10-17-2009, 09:55 PM
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LOL, anytime some one mentions there kid playing on a AAA hockey team in the off season you automatically come back with the comment.
I am just again pointing out that it is not all summer long.
Cheerio!

And im just pointing out (once again) that my comment was towards HC who was talking about signing the kid up in powerskating schools/clinics over the summer.

And i actually say that not matter what level the kid is playing at, i say that when a kid is playing all summer long. So once again what was your point?

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10-18-2009, 06:40 AM
  #43
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One thing I've noticed about Spring and even Summer Hockey or Power Skating.

Despite the fact that a lot the rinks take the ice out for a number of months it sure is easier to schedule icetime.

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10-18-2009, 07:08 AM
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Evaluations

Played,coached, scouted, evaluated youth hockey since the 1950's. Let's get down to the basics.

Each category is divided into first year and second year.Most youth hockey jurisdictions follow the calendar year. Jan 1 - Dec. 31.A youngster may be viewed as an "old" or a "young". A 7 year old born Jan 1(old) is grouped with a 7 year old born Dec 31(young), but there is a big difference in their physical, mental, cognitive abilities because of the 363 day gap.

Evaluations. Most organizations will run evaluations - cones, skating, shooting,passing, timed, etc, of all the registered players.The comparisons should be available at various levels - his teammates, organizational history, age expectation. Ask to see the evaluations to appreciate how your son rates. A "young" who rates very high and is ahead of the "old" is advantaged.

Few other points. Getting exposure to other sports is a plus since it developes discipline and athletic skills. Also playing decision-making type games or problem solving helps.

Good luck.

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10-18-2009, 07:23 AM
  #45
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That really has nothing to do with what i was saying. HC said to sign the kid up in every power skating school/clinic he could. I disagreed. It was pretty straight forward.
A lot of kids actually want to get in power skating, nothing wrong with doing that at all.

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10-19-2009, 11:17 AM
  #46
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sorry, depends on the kid...I have never once even mentioned going to practice, or a stick & puck, or had to wake him for his 7am Saturday morning games....he can't get enough....so the fact I actually got him into some karate lessons was a small miracle.

Don't push a kid, don't hold him back either - EVERY kid inspires to play pro one day, and they'll find out soon enough, it won't happen...don't dampen that now...plenty of time for reality one day...

and who knows, get into a Div I college, and things can happen

point is , some kids thrive on being pushed, some need to do it at their own pace, some need all hockey, some need multiple sports and interest....there is no golden rule, except don't listen to anyone that doesn't know your kid

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10-19-2009, 11:22 AM
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my 8 YO played on a Spring/Summer AAA team and does summer camp....and after 3 weeks off the ice, he's bugging me constantly to go back on...I push (ie hold him back) just to get that BREAK.....

I burnt out on soccer and only played 1/2 years.....there is no official cut off point...depends on your kid

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