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Old
11-20-2009, 11:52 AM
  #1
Elvs
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Ducks blog / market for journalists in the U.S.

Blog link removed

Many of you have seen it earlier. But this time it's about to get more serious. It could be a good read for those of you who aren't satisfied with the little noise about this team out there, who just can't get enough. I get to see Mattias Modig plenty where I live so I'm gonna share some reports on him among other stuff.

I was also curious, are there any other private Ducks blogs who have become quite known? I can't think of any. I realize now that staying in Sweden was a huge mistake when I could have been in Santa Monica by now. It's too late now to get over there through school, so I must find other ways. Improving my English would be one thing, and having a lot of readers would be even better if I'm at some point is goning to look for a job in the U.S.

Cuz quite frankly, that's the only place I could work as a sports writer outside of Sweden. Canada, Australia and the UK would work I guess, but no one in the last two mentioned gives **** about hockey. This is a small country and there aren't a lot of newspapers here. In the U.S. on the other hand, although I know it's hard to find a job there as well, at least you have lots of news papers, magazines etc. Hopefully there is a market there sometime.

Oh and again please check it out frequently. I want and need your feedback. I want it to grow at least somewhat big. I really really want some redemption for my stupid choice in the summer. Thanks in advance.


Last edited by Elvs: 11-23-2009 at 10:31 AM. Reason: not allowed
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11-20-2009, 12:41 PM
  #2
Arselona
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Don't worry, at 19 you're definitely too young to make any absolute wrong career choices.

Good idea to market the blog some. Remember to update often as well.

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11-20-2009, 01:12 PM
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c4rcy
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Originally Posted by Arselona View Post
Don't worry, at 19 you're definitely too young to make any absolute wrong career choices.

Good idea to market the blog some. Remember to update often as well.
Unless you go into porn...but even then it's pretty profitable.

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11-20-2009, 01:50 PM
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Kevin Forbes
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I guess this thread has my name written all over it.

Short history:
I started working for Hockey's Future in August 2002, when I was 17. After graduating high school, I went to college for computer stuff, didn't like it. Finished the program (2 years) and was set to *follow the dream* and pursue a degree in Journalism at a local university. Instead, I received an offer to do computer stuff for a sport organization. I couldn't justify turning down tens of thousands of dollars a year to pay out tens of thousands of dollars a year. So I took the job and turned down my acceptance to go to Journalism school.

Since then, I've made an effort to advance myself and my writing. Through HF and the other outlets I contribute for, I've been able to cover a Memorial Cup and I'm currently credentialed with the CHL for my fourth year in a row. I've been able to interview hockey folk ranging from Patrick Roy to Dick Todd to Ted Nolan to Don Hay to Red Berenson to Pat Quinn to Corey Hirsch to Gilbert Brule to Jordan Staal to Steve Downie to Jakub Voracek, among many many others.

I've learned it all on the job. I've learned how to be a journalist by doing it. Learned how to interview people by doing it, how to prepare, how to write a story, research, the whole shebang.

If I would have gone to J-School, I would have graduated this past May, thousands of dollars in debt and likely no better off then where I am now. I have made a small bit of money from writing, but nothing substantial. I've been doing it for over 7 years because I enjoy it, but I truly feel like it has only been the past four years that I have taken it seriously and thus gained the most. It's my hobby, but it's now also my job.

With that said, here are my thoughts on journalism:

The landscape of journalism is changing and depending on who you ask, that is either the scariest thing in the world or the most exciting development around.

The reason for it all is the Internet. Being online allows people from around the world to access information from anywhere. The rise of "citizen journalism" and "self publication" has given a rise to blogs, allowing people who normally would have a limited audience to potentially reach millions.

The Internet has changed the model of journalism and now the industry is trying to react and adapt. Newsrooms are consolidating and shrinking as the print and television medium faces a changing world. Sports departments are among the hardest hit, usually the travel involved makes them costly.

The way in which the general public receives and assimilates information has changed and the delivery method has changed as well. They want up-to-the-minute information that they can manipulate on their own.

The problem with this is the pay model. There has yet to be something sweeping that allows for the journalists to survive in the online world. Some sites have tried subscription services (which flies in the face of the idea of a Free Internet with unlimited access), some have tried hosting advertisement (which has proven to have inconsistent return on investment and which users naturally complain about (Hockey's Future is now owned by Crave Online which in turn operates with Gorilla Nation, one of the largest online advertising firms in the world).

Right now, online journalism looks like this:
1. Release content to the masses
2. ?????
3. Profit

Figuring out #2 is the sticking point.

I guess, therein lies the rub, if you want to do it, it's easy to get started (as you already have) but succeeding to a level that you can live off your wages is extremely difficult, at least in the online scheme of things.

With that said, use online as a springboard. Use it to find your voice, your style, to get your name out there. For a while there I was THE Anaheim Ducks prospect guru.

But it's not easy. It requires a lot of dedication and a lot of discipline. I started this when I was 17 and I've grown up a lot with HF. Not many of the staff have been with HF anywhere as long as I have. My own struggles with discipline are part of the reason why I no longer cover the Ducks and in the past year, I've had to recommit myself to writing as my will faltered as the rest of my life continues to grow. In the end, I think if I stopped writing now, it would leave a hole in my life.

It's a process. It's a commitment. It's not easy and it takes time. There's not a lot of money involved. But I wouldn't trade it for anything right now.

I'd definitely be interested in talking further, answering any questions you have to the best of my ability.

As far as private Ducks bloggers becoming well known, the top of the heap is Earl Sleek. Hopefully he pops by.

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Old
11-20-2009, 02:14 PM
  #5
Elvs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Forbes View Post
I guess this thread has my name written all over it.

Short history:
I started working for Hockey's Future in August 2002, when I was 17. After graduating high school, I went to college for computer stuff, didn't like it. Finished the program (2 years) and was set to *follow the dream* and pursue a degree in Journalism at a local university. Instead, I received an offer to do computer stuff for a sport organization. I couldn't justify turning down tens of thousands of dollars a year to pay out tens of thousands of dollars a year. So I took the job and turned down my acceptance to go to Journalism school.

Since then, I've made an effort to advance myself and my writing. Through HF and the other outlets I contribute for, I've been able to cover a Memorial Cup and I'm currently credentialed with the CHL for my fourth year in a row. I've been able to interview hockey folk ranging from Patrick Roy to Dick Todd to Ted Nolan to Don Hay to Red Berenson to Pat Quinn to Corey Hirsch to Gilbert Brule to Jordan Staal to Steve Downie to Jakub Voracek, among many many others.

I've learned it all on the job. I've learned how to be a journalist by doing it. Learned how to interview people by doing it, how to prepare, how to write a story, research, the whole shebang.

If I would have gone to J-School, I would have graduated this past May, thousands of dollars in debt and likely no better off then where I am now. I have made a small bit of money from writing, but nothing substantial. I've been doing it for over 7 years because I enjoy it, but I truly feel like it has only been the past four years that I have taken it seriously and thus gained the most. It's my hobby, but it's now also my job.

With that said, here are my thoughts on journalism:

The landscape of journalism is changing and depending on who you ask, that is either the scariest thing in the world or the most exciting development around.

The reason for it all is the Internet. Being online allows people from around the world to access information from anywhere. The rise of "citizen journalism" and "self publication" has given a rise to blogs, allowing people who normally would have a limited audience to potentially reach millions.

The Internet has changed the model of journalism and now the industry is trying to react and adapt. Newsrooms are consolidating and shrinking as the print and television medium faces a changing world. Sports departments are among the hardest hit, usually the travel involved makes them costly.

The way in which the general public receives and assimilates information has changed and the delivery method has changed as well. They want up-to-the-minute information that they can manipulate on their own.

The problem with this is the pay model. There has yet to be something sweeping that allows for the journalists to survive in the online world. Some sites have tried subscription services (which flies in the face of the idea of a Free Internet with unlimited access), some have tried hosting advertisement (which has proven to have inconsistent return on investment and which users naturally complain about (Hockey's Future is now owned by Crave Online which in turn operates with Gorilla Nation, one of the largest online advertising firms in the world).

Right now, online journalism looks like this:
1. Release content to the masses
2. ?????
3. Profit

Figuring out #2 is the sticking point.

I guess, therein lies the rub, if you want to do it, it's easy to get started (as you already have) but succeeding to a level that you can live off your wages is extremely difficult, at least in the online scheme of things.

With that said, use online as a springboard. Use it to find your voice, your style, to get your name out there. For a while there I was THE Anaheim Ducks prospect guru.

But it's not easy. It requires a lot of dedication and a lot of discipline. I started this when I was 17 and I've grown up a lot with HF. Not many of the staff have been with HF anywhere as long as I have. My own struggles with discipline are part of the reason why I no longer cover the Ducks and in the past year, I've had to recommit myself to writing as my will faltered as the rest of my life continues to grow. In the end, I think if I stopped writing now, it would leave a hole in my life.

It's a process. It's a commitment. It's not easy and it takes time. There's not a lot of money involved. But I wouldn't trade it for anything right now.

I'd definitely be interested in talking further, answering any questions you have to the best of my ability.

As far as private Ducks bloggers becoming well known, the top of the heap is Earl Sleek. Hopefully he pops by.
Thanks a lot. The whole blog/twitter/facebook thing is something we obviously talk about a lot in school. I've been writing for three and a half years now and is like you self learned through that.

I don't know how it works over there, but over here there's no way I could find a job as a sports writer no matter how much knowledge I have. I must have the education. I believe it's pretty much the same in the U.S. in that regard, but here the importance of actually knowing anything about sports is next to none, the writing is almost all that matters. Which is why Swedish media sucks when it comes to the NHL...

I don't think my career is ruined because I didn't go. But it certainly wouldn't have been to my disadvantage when looking for work in the U.S. if I had lived and went to school there. tbh, I stayed because of a girl, which suddenly didn't matter at all to her. No one could actually have cared less... So now I'll hate her for the rest of my life if she's the reason I don't get where I want. Now I just wanna get as rich as possibly only so I can laugh people here in Sweden in the face and knowing I accomplished something.


Last edited by Elvs: 11-20-2009 at 02:20 PM.
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Old
11-20-2009, 07:31 PM
  #6
Elvs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arselona View Post
Don't worry, at 19 you're definitely too young to make any absolute wrong career choices.

Good idea to market the blog some. Remember to update often as well.
Yes, this part will be extra important in the beginning. Another couple of posts now. Not being active enough was my mistake last time. Gotta have patience in the beginning.

Many missed today's practice, that's concerning... I'd be quite shocked if we manage to steal a point tomorrow.


Last edited by Elvs: 11-20-2009 at 07:48 PM.
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Old
11-21-2009, 01:01 PM
  #7
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I love the Internet, anything is ****ing possible. Playlist added to the site, free and legal.

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Old
11-21-2009, 02:27 PM
  #8
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Speaking of which. I want to add some music that is generally played in Honda Center, other than the goal song. I was hoping some of you who are going to the games could help me out by naming a few.

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11-22-2009, 12:24 AM
  #9
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What's stopping you from going to Santa Monica next year? It's not like that school is going away any time soon. I'm from Sweden and I decided to do my entire degree in Australia. It is costly, sure, but atleast I don't have to live in the run down crap country that Sweden is turning into.

Even if you've started doing a degree in Sweden it's never too late to pack your things and start a new elsewhere, especially if you're only 19.

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Old
11-22-2009, 04:46 PM
  #10
Elvs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Van Cleef View Post
What's stopping you from going to Santa Monica next year? It's not like that school is going away any time soon. I'm from Sweden and I decided to do my entire degree in Australia. It is costly, sure, but atleast I don't have to live in the run down crap country that Sweden is turning into.

Even if you've started doing a degree in Sweden it's never too late to pack your things and start a new elsewhere, especially if you're only 19.
You're right and I've been thinking about it and will keep doing so. Thing is, after three months here I know for certain I can handle this education, and giving it up to go somewhere else would be a risk. Although I suppose I could always go back if it wouldn't work out, but then as you say, money is a concern. I'm not planning to pay back loans for the rest of my life.

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11-22-2009, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Elvstrand View Post
You're right and I've been thinking about it and will keep doing so. Thing is, after three months here I know for certain I can handle this education, and giving it up to go somewhere else would be a risk. Although I suppose I could always go back if it wouldn't work out, but then as you say, money is a concern. I'm not planning to pay back loans for the rest of my life.
Take the risk. I spent a year of college overseas and it was awesome.

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11-22-2009, 09:57 PM
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elvstrand View Post
You're right and I've been thinking about it and will keep doing so. Thing is, after three months here I know for certain I can handle this education, and giving it up to go somewhere else would be a risk. Although I suppose I could always go back if it wouldn't work out, but then as you say, money is a concern. I'm not planning to pay back loans for the rest of my life.
Like Spankatola said, the risk is worth it. You will probably think back for the rest of your life if you don't take the chance, there'll be a lot of "what ifs". As you say yourself there's not a big market for sports journalists in Sweden, and managing to score a gig at the bigger outlets is almost impossible if you have no connections.

As someone who is currently "living the dream" my advice to you is to do it. Take the risk, you will spend a good chunk of your life paying back student loans, but you might earn ten fold of what you would earn in backwater Sweden.

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Old
11-29-2009, 07:12 AM
  #13
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wow, things are really starting to sparkle now. A couple of days ago someone asked permission to link to my blog and now this:

Quote:
Our specific Ducks Blog-Off can be found here...

http://thenhlarena.com/index.php?showtopic=117164

First we wish to determine which is the most Ducks related blog (which will then be declared the official Ducks Blog of The NHL Arena and be given a dedicated banner in our Ducks subforum sidebar), and then the winner will go head to head with blogs featuring other teams in your Division, Conference and ultimately be given the chance to be the best NHL team related blog of all.

I don't know if you would like to alert your readers and give them a chance to vote for you, or not. But in any event, I thought you might like to know that your blog is in the running.
I'm very surprised it would be known this soon. You can vote for six blogs, so vote for me please haha. You would have to register, but no activation through email is nessecary.


Last edited by Elvs: 11-29-2009 at 08:05 AM.
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