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How old is too old to learn to play hockey....

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Old
12-16-2009, 12:18 PM
  #26
jamo27
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Originally Posted by ShannMC17 View Post
So I was wondering if anyone thinks that there is an age where it's just impossible to learn how to play hockey. I'm 22 years old, and I have recently decided that I want to learn how to play hockey, I know it's going to be hard but I am determined to learn how to play. I don't want to just watch the game anymore, I want to be involved. Just finished my first skating lessons and now I'm going to take an intro to hockey class.

So all in all I'm just wondering if anyone else has learned to play hockey at my age?
I never played when I was young, but always wanted to. When I attended University (at your age), I finally started to play. I took a bunch of power skating courses and played in lower level leagues to gain confidence.

I am now in my late thirties and have been coaching for a couple years.

You are definitely not too old to start. Have fun!! .......and work on the skating; that is the hardest part.

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12-16-2009, 12:43 PM
  #27
Jive Time
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I have news for you .... 22 years old isn't too old to do anything new. The post actually made me laugh because I am over 40. I was expecting someone around my age or older asking this question about too old to learn to play hockey.

Now be quiet and go learn and have fun at it.
Too funny; I totally agree. There are loads of people in our area starting up with no experience at 40+.

The learning curve is the best place to be. There is a great passage from book written by John Long that summarizes this well:

Quote:
Rock Jocks, Wall Rats, and Hang Dogs: Rock Climbing on the Edge of Reality

It is strangely fantastic to reflect back on these early days when all our dreams were open ended and unfulfilled. Not so many years have passed but life is measured by the potholes, not the length of the road. A person has but one chance in life, when he is young and foolish and ignorant to absolutely and perfectly desire something as we desired to fly. It seemed that if we didn't follow our calling that all was lost,
and life would never make any sense to us. Only later would things get too complicated and muddled to think and act so decisively, and only later would we realize that those early days were the best days of all.
Substitute your sport and there you have it.

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12-16-2009, 02:21 PM
  #28
SouthpawTRK
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I don't think that anyone is ever too old to play hockey. I think that a person has to know their limits, so that they do not over exert themselves or do things to cause themselves harm.

About the middle of this year, I decided that I would buy all the gear I needed to play hockey and learn how to ice skate. I plan on joining an adult league in the summer of 2010 and just turned 42 a few months ago.

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12-16-2009, 03:39 PM
  #29
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Originally Posted by ShannMC17 View Post
Thanks everyone!

So I officially signed up for my class, starts Jan. 9! Can't wait!

Out of curiosity are you taking classes at Sharks Ice in Fremont/San Jose?

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12-16-2009, 03:50 PM
  #30
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I started at 27, and I'm now one of the best players on my beer league team. It was a big help that I had done a lot of rollerblading, and I had watched enough hockey to understand most of the strategy and rule basics.

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12-16-2009, 03:53 PM
  #31
Clint
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I don't want to rain on anyone's parade, but am I the only one who thinks that ShannMC17 should NOT be shelling out cash for lessons until she's mastered skating and has committed the fundamentals to muscle memory? I'm thinking that she may get frustrated at what could be perceived as lack of progress if his skating fundamentals aren't where they need to be.

I've seen this happen over and over again at my local rink by adults and seniors who throw down over 2 G's for top of the line gear, skates, stick, and lessons then look like fools when they step on the ice and can do little more than stand up straight.

I would recommend putting in a LOT of time at the local arena just skating in the public sessions at first. Once the OP can cross-overs, (left and right, forward and back) and stop on a dime, then I would recommend putting a stick in her hands and strapping on pads.

Bottom line is you don't need to pay for a beginner's hockey lesson to learn the fundamentals of skating. That's just a waste of money. It can be learned by practice and repetition much cheaper than paying for individual or group lessons.

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12-16-2009, 04:35 PM
  #32
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Im 20 and am going to learn how to skate this winter

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12-16-2009, 04:50 PM
  #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clint View Post
I don't want to rain on anyone's parade, but am I the only one who thinks that ShannMC17 should NOT be shelling out cash for lessons until she's mastered skating and has committed the fundamentals to muscle memory? I'm thinking that she may get frustrated at what could be perceived as lack of progress if his skating fundamentals aren't where they need to be.

I've seen this happen over and over again at my local rink by adults and seniors who throw down over 2 G's for top of the line gear, skates, stick, and lessons then look like fools when they step on the ice and can do little more than stand up straight.

I would recommend putting in a LOT of time at the local arena just skating in the public sessions at first. Once the OP can cross-overs, (left and right, forward and back) and stop on a dime, then I would recommend putting a stick in her hands and strapping on pads.

Bottom line is you don't need to pay for a beginner's hockey lesson to learn the fundamentals of skating. That's just a waste of money. It can be learned by practice and repetition much cheaper than paying for individual or group lessons.
Think about that for a second. What do you want to commit to muscle memory? Technique based on good basics or bad?

I will agree that time on ice is extremely important, but starting off with proper basics and a regular dose of good coaching will hugely multiply the effects of time spent on the ice.

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12-16-2009, 04:57 PM
  #34
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I've had customers who were close to 60 just starting to learn and doing well.

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12-16-2009, 05:05 PM
  #35
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I learned to skate at 32 in February of this year - actually my 7 year old son and I did as we both wanted to learn how to play hockey. After speaking with some very knowledgable coaches we took skating classes (not hockey classes, just beginner figure skating classes) with a bunch of 5 - 8 y.o. figure skaters. Best decision ever! I learned to skate around without cumbersome gear/sticks which adds a significant amount of complexity for an adult to learn new physical skills. 'sides, the kids enjoyed watching a grown adult fumble around and fall more than them.

I found out that the best way to learn to skate is to just learn to skate - leave the puck handling, sticks, etc... for later, after the basics (forward, backward, stopping, basic forward crossovers) are learned. Our only purchases where hockey skates (learned in those instead of the flatter bladed figure skates) and cheapo-shin pads to protect knees (the kiddo wore a also helmet though). Can probably even just wear roller-blade style knee pads when learning I imagine.

Once I had the basics down, I attended the hockey "academy" which is actually for kids (no adult intro program at the local rink at that time). There were several other parents of kids that were learning as well, and I have to say I progressed a lot faster in learning other skills compared to them simply because I had already learned the basics on what my feet/skates should be doing without having to worry about a stick, pads, etc...

After about 4 or 5 classes covering puckhandling basics etc.. I started going to the puck-play (open nets, bunch of pucks, skate around and shoot) and playing in the lowest of low beer league's and my game has improved from then on. Still learning new things though...

Sorry for the long post though..

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Old
12-16-2009, 05:20 PM
  #36
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Originally Posted by DJnet65 View Post
Out of curiosity are you taking classes at Sharks Ice in Fremont/San Jose?
I'm from the east coast, lol, so no.

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Old
12-16-2009, 05:29 PM
  #37
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Originally Posted by Clint View Post
I don't want to rain on anyone's parade, but am I the only one who thinks that ShannMC17 should NOT be shelling out cash for lessons until she's mastered skating and has committed the fundamentals to muscle memory? I'm thinking that she may get frustrated at what could be perceived as lack of progress if his skating fundamentals aren't where they need to be.

I've seen this happen over and over again at my local rink by adults and seniors who throw down over 2 G's for top of the line gear, skates, stick, and lessons then look like fools when they step on the ice and can do little more than stand up straight.

I would recommend putting in a LOT of time at the local arena just skating in the public sessions at first. Once the OP can cross-overs, (left and right, forward and back) and stop on a dime, then I would recommend putting a stick in her hands and strapping on pads.

Bottom line is you don't need to pay for a beginner's hockey lesson to learn the fundamentals of skating. That's just a waste of money. It can be learned by practice and repetition much cheaper than paying for individual or group lessons.
Not raining on the parade Clint, I understand what you mean. I have taken an intro to skating course and I go to the rink at least twice a week (I would go more but college schedule) to work on what I have learned. This next course I'm taking is to capitalize on what I have already learned and to introduce hockey to the skating elements. Also like Crosbyfan said, I'd rather learn the fundamentals correctly, even if it is harder and maybe more discouraging. I'm all about challenges

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Old
12-16-2009, 09:00 PM
  #38
Gino 14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clint View Post
I don't want to rain on anyone's parade, but am I the only one who thinks that ShannMC17 should NOT be shelling out cash for lessons until she's mastered skating and has committed the fundamentals to muscle memory? I'm thinking that she may get frustrated at what could be perceived as lack of progress if his skating fundamentals aren't where they need to be.

I've seen this happen over and over again at my local rink by adults and seniors who throw down over 2 G's for top of the line gear, skates, stick, and lessons then look like fools when they step on the ice and can do little more than stand up straight.

I would recommend putting in a LOT of time at the local arena just skating in the public sessions at first. Once the OP can cross-overs, (left and right, forward and back) and stop on a dime, then I would recommend putting a stick in her hands and strapping on pads.

Bottom line is you don't need to pay for a beginner's hockey lesson to learn the fundamentals of skating. That's just a waste of money. It can be learned by practice and repetition much cheaper than paying for individual or group lessons.
Couldn't disagree more. First, if you're an adult shelling out 2G's for gear and you get frustrated, so what? You've earned the money and the right to spend your money to chase your dream.
I started skating at 42. I found it much more enjoyable going to drop-ins, skate and shoots, and Learn to Play sessions than I ever did public skating. Public skate sessions suck. Besides, what better way to learn the fundamentals of hockey than with a bunch of others that are in the same boat as you are. Most people that attend public sessions can't skate and haven't the slightest clue how to go or stop.

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Old
12-16-2009, 09:39 PM
  #39
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To the OP, Congrats on your decision and Best of Luck!

For motivation, just look at Jay Caufield. He could barely skate, but made it to the NHL!

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12-16-2009, 09:51 PM
  #40
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To the OP, Congrats on your decision and Best of Luck!

For motivation, just look at Jay Caufield. He could barely skate, but made it to the NHL!
It helps that he was 6'4 240lb. There will always be room in the NHL for big guys that can (barely) skate.

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12-17-2009, 12:03 AM
  #41
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It helps that he was 6'4 240lb. There will always be room in the NHL for big guys that can (barely) skate.
lol just saw him yesterday at a sushi place.

I started playing ice at 20, I'm in my third season on a womens league. I'm sometimes a decent skater but when I start over thinking it, I suck.

Anyway, we have a 64 yr old woman on the team. She started at 60. She's good in front of the net.

It's never too late! One of our best players started at 18 and is now 28. Average age is mid 30s.

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12-19-2009, 01:01 AM
  #42
james bond
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I am not sure what was exactly meant by the OP but (NHL wise) I heard Reggie Leach started playing when he was 14 and Ed Jovonoski started when he was 12. Anybody know of any other late starting NHLer's?

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06-06-2013, 03:41 AM
  #43
PGCougar
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Hey guys!

I read this thread so I know that it might never be too late to start playing. My question is kinda different, though.
I'll turn 17 this August and starting in August I'm gonna stay in Canada for 10 months as an exchange student. I always wanted to play hockey but since we don't have many hockey teams in Germany and my parents didn't wanna make these long road trips and stuff, I started playing soccer. Anyways, I know how to skate and I'd just love to finally start playing hockey! So I was wondering if it might be possible to start playing in Canada (which I consider the prime destination for hockey players). I don't know where I'll stay exactly but it led me to a few questions.
1. Are there really that many outdoor rinks so that you could just play there in your spare time?
2. How many Canadian High Schools have their own teams? Do you think it might be possible to just practice with them but don't even play the games (probably I wouldn't be good enough)?
3. In Germany there are no school teams but we have many small clubs for any sports outside of the schools. Are there clubs like that in Canada, should I start playing there if I could?
4. Any other options?

Thanks for your help!!

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06-06-2013, 08:44 AM
  #44
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Hey guys!

I read this thread so I know that it might never be too late to start playing. My question is kinda different, though.
I'll turn 17 this August and starting in August I'm gonna stay in Canada for 10 months as an exchange student. I always wanted to play hockey but since we don't have many hockey teams in Germany and my parents didn't wanna make these long road trips and stuff, I started playing soccer. Anyways, I know how to skate and I'd just love to finally start playing hockey! So I was wondering if it might be possible to start playing in Canada (which I consider the prime destination for hockey players). I don't know where I'll stay exactly but it led me to a few questions.
1. Are there really that many outdoor rinks so that you could just play there in your spare time?
2. How many Canadian High Schools have their own teams? Do you think it might be possible to just practice with them but don't even play the games (probably I wouldn't be good enough)?
3. In Germany there are no school teams but we have many small clubs for any sports outside of the schools. Are there clubs like that in Canada, should I start playing there if I could?
4. Any other options?

Thanks for your help!!
1 - Depends on where you are. If you're in a rural area, often you just skate on frozen lakes and ponds. There aren't nearly as many outdoor rinks as there used to be, due to legal liability if someone slips and cracks their skull. Just another negative effect of our increasingly litigious, PC society. When I was a kid, every park and schoolyard had outdoor rinks.
2 - The majority of high schools have a boy's hockey team and many have girl's teams, (Provided the student body is large enough). Ice time is expensive so most high school teams rarely practice.
3 - There are thousands of minor hockey league teams in Canada. Research the GTHL if you want an idea of minor hockey in Canada. Your best bet is the local House League. At 17, I believe you would be in the Midget age group. House Leagues are open to anyone that wants to play, regardless of skill level and the costs are affordable. The most competetive levels of minor hockey in Canada can cost upwards of $10,000 per year.

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06-06-2013, 08:54 AM
  #45
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Which province are you going to? The hockey experience really varies depending on your location.


1. Are there really that many outdoor rinks so that you could just play there in your spare time?

Depends on where in Canada you are - the west coast has absolutely none (the weather isn't cold enough), where I live now on the prairies has them in every neighbourhood in the city and you can skate and practice hockey whenever you want.


2. How many Canadian High Schools have their own teams? Do you think it might be possible to just practice with them but don't even play the games (probably I wouldn't be good enough)?


Some areas have leagues, some don't (see previous answer!).


3. In Germany there are no school teams but we have many small clubs for any sports outside of the schools. Are there clubs like that in Canada, should I start playing there if I could?

Yes. Generally, there are going to be house leagues in most locations.

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06-06-2013, 09:36 AM
  #46
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I started playing at 28 and have been playing at least 2 times per week, every week for the last 3 years. Congrats on your decision and good luck!

My life is now: family, hockey, work and that is all. This game will consume you.

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Old
06-06-2013, 09:55 AM
  #47
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Originally Posted by ShannMC17 View Post
So I was wondering if anyone thinks that there is an age where it's just impossible to learn how to play hockey. I'm 22 years old, and I have recently decided that I want to learn how to play hockey, I know it's going to be hard but I am determined to learn how to play. I don't want to just watch the game anymore, I want to be involved. Just finished my first skating lessons and now I'm going to take an intro to hockey class.

So all in all I'm just wondering if anyone else has learned to play hockey at my age?
This is seriously a ridiculous question. I apologize if that is rude but come on...
Your asking if your too old to learn to play hockey. Ice or roller, that is absurd. And of all ages your talking about 22, your golden years.

There are plenty of people who are learning ice hockey or roller hockey or skating or much tougher tasks at a much older age than you.

I get upset at this because you waste time asking people if its too late for you when you could just use the time to browse the net for local open ice hockey games or clinics. In New York, theres plenty all year round all over the place.

Yet no matter where you live, if you really want to learn or do something you will find a way. no matter how old you are, no matter the challenges ahead.

Go skating as much as you can to learn the basic skill. Find open skates and go as much as you can. Roller blade when you want to do more and cant get on the ice. Practice in your own home or outside.

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06-06-2013, 10:03 AM
  #48
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This is seriously a ridiculous question. I apologize if that is rude but come on...
Your asking if your too old to learn to play hockey. Ice or roller, that is absurd. And of all ages your talking about 22, your golden years.
This. Youngsters think now is all there is.

I just started playing at 49.

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Old
06-06-2013, 10:36 AM
  #49
Frankie Spankie
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Heh, how time flies, posted here 3+ years ago. I do want to emphasize again, you're never too old to learn. Right now I'm playing with two guys in their late thirties that just started playing hockey a year ago.

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06-06-2013, 12:45 PM
  #50
PGCougar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boo10 View Post
1 - Depends on where you are. If you're in a rural area, often you just skate on frozen lakes and ponds. There aren't nearly as many outdoor rinks as there used to be, due to legal liability if someone slips and cracks their skull. Just another negative effect of our increasingly litigious, PC society. When I was a kid, every park and schoolyard had outdoor rinks.
2 - The majority of high schools have a boy's hockey team and many have girl's teams, (Provided the student body is large enough). Ice time is expensive so most high school teams rarely practice.
3 - There are thousands of minor hockey league teams in Canada. Research the GTHL if you want an idea of minor hockey in Canada. Your best bet is the local House League. At 17, I believe you would be in the Midget age group. House Leagues are open to anyone that wants to play, regardless of skill level and the costs are affordable. The most competetive levels of minor hockey in Canada can cost upwards of $10,000 per year.
Thank you guys!
1. I don't know where I'll stay yet, because the organization I travel with has to find a host family first. This could be everywhere in Canada but they told me that most students are placed in BC, Alberta, Ontario and Yukon (which I don't hope although they might have endless frozen lakes in about 10 months of the year).
3. How much do you think would I have to pay at least (regardless of equipment)? That whole exchange thing is really expensive (like $20.000) and my parents don't have thousands of dollars left to pay for hockey. Neither do I...

What way to start would you recommend if I had any possibility? School, a local minor league, ...?

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