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Playing with disease or physical handicaps - non sports related physical issues

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01-28-2010, 07:01 PM
  #1
Hockeyfan68
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Playing with disease or physical handicaps - non sports related physical issues

Okay do you have to play hockey with some sort of physical handicap, disease or illness?

Non- sports related, the thread isn't for "I tore a muscle once and it is hard to play now". I'm looking for "I have a heart issue yet still play under doctor supervision".

I am one of these ... I was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis in late 2007 and that is a disease where your immune system attacks your intestines after it attacks a bacteria outbreak. An autoimmune disease is what it is.

The only cure is surgical removal of the diseased section of large intestine which for obvious reasons is not done until it has to be if ever. Basically though whatever is there is permanatly messed up and never heals so it always bleeds and is always painful.

The side effects of any inflammation does the same thing Cancer does and that is to suppress your body chemistry in a way where your body stops absorbing B12 vitamins which is necessary for blood production as well as iron deficiency anemia.

So what happened was my stomach stopped secreting intrinsic factor, a protein that bonds with b12 and then carried off to be absorbed by your intestines to make blood which you obviously need to live.

I have Pernicious Anemia and iron deficiency anemia and have to take iron and B12 everyday or else I will get sick and die. This used to be a fatal illness until the 1950s. I cannot take the regular pill form of b12 as it can't be absorbed so I use sublingual B12 under the tongue and is absorbed into the bloodstream that way.

The side effect of this pernicious Anemia is nerve damage and for most of 2008, and most of 2009 I spent it trying to heal nerve damage.

I have some residual effects which include wrist numbness and muscle spasms under the skin on my calves. I also have flashing white light in a dark room when I look side to side which is from optic nerve damage.

When at my sickest my little toe nails fell out, I had visual disturbances, heart palpatations and skipping beats, my feet were numb and my hands and feet were bussing like holding a vibrating razor or something but i wasn't holding anything. Weight loss as well as scaly skin, light sensitivity and several other neuroglical problems I won't take the time to list and explain.

The symptoms are the same as one who starts to get MS which obviously was a tough thing to go through.

Right now I am healthy and have everything under control .... I know some day the Ulcerative Colitis will worsen, sometimes it doesn't but that is very rare.

If you remember Kevin Dineen who is now a coach for the AHL Portland Pirates was diagnosed with a similar disease which is more potent in its damage called Chrohn's Disease. he played his entire NHL career at times not feeling very well.

Anyway the disease I have causes a lot of problems and will be lifelong to deal with.

Some days when I play hockey my chemistry isn't right I am just dead out there but most of the time I am perfect and fit as a fiddle. I cannot control the bad days though.

I have abdominal pain everyday and playing with it is tough sometimes but I love hockey so quitting is not an option. This Persani guy for the Edmonton Oilers has the same thing I have and he plays at as higher level.

I am glad to be alive because in late 2007 into 2008 I was very very sick and almost hospitalized and was close to organ failure and death.

The main troubles I have had are with the nerve damage from the B12 deficiency. I use 5,000mcg of B12 under the tongue everyday and it keeps me good as well as 130mg of iron which for a normal person would be a high risk for iron toxicity. But because of blood loss and bacteria that eats iron I have to take that much.

B12 is water soluble so whatever not used goes out in the wash so to speak when you go to the crapper but iron stays in your tissues causing tissue breakdown and organ damage so I have to be careful with it. It can cause death from heart failure or other organ failure or diabetes from a toxic pancreas.

Anyway if you play with some disease or physical handicap tell your story.

I was also diagnosed with Cortical Cataracts which will have to be dealt with obviously with lens replacement surgery. Right now I see halos around lights at night and see double traffic lights etc. During the day NO troubles at all and my vison is still 20/20. My eye doctor said "Welcome to middle age".


Last edited by Hockeyfan68: 01-28-2010 at 07:08 PM.
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01-29-2010, 09:30 AM
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Jarick
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Jesus, that sounds horrible!

I have a mystery cough. It developed after I had bronchitis 2.5 years ago. At that time I had been playing hockey for a year as an adult (played through junior high then stopped), and I was getting exponentially better.

After I was sick, any time I performed any aerobic activity, I start hacking and coughing. My lung function dropped quite a bit, and any time I try and push myself physically (to get in better shape, to get stronger, to lose weight), I get very sick with bronchitis, a sinus infection, or something similar. So I've plateaued.

The docs said it was sports asthma, but the inhalers never worked. It gets a little better after some antibiotics, but it gets worse after I'm sick. It just never goes away, and it sucks.

Last Sunday, I was going to play a double header of games. I play up a level and we had a short bench, so I was working really hard. I leave the game with my gear on (take off skates, put on shoes), head out to my car, and drive to the next rink.

A few miles down the road, I start coughing, then I get lightheaded, then I have trouble breathing, then all my limbs go numb. I pull off to a hospital to see if they had albuterol, but instead they take me to the ER. They do all the tests, but after an hour it turns out I'm technically healthy, just pushed myself too hard and my lungs can't keep up.

So at the end of the day, I'm a 26-year-old who can barely play hockey without getting sick, won't ever get in better shape, and there's an outside chance I have a debilitating lung disease that is common only to people who've smoked for 40 years.

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01-29-2010, 10:05 AM
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Man, Hockey68, you should get a medal for fighting through illnesses that would have put most people on their A$$, let alone out of hockey.

I have a mild form of ischemia colitis, but avoid certain foods and tight clothing that will exacerbate it. Also, it is crucial that with ANY form of colitis you must go to bed early, and avoid caffeine and alcohol, plus many types of foods (chocolate, etc.).

I also get ocular migraines so avoiding bright lights is a MUST as I literally go blind when the migraine attacks - so night driving is a challenge as I cannot look into the headlights of oncoming vehicles. This also means my office fluorescent lights must be kept off/very low.

The rest of my issues are mostly a bum left knee and left shoulder problems - too much pickup basketball played on concrete city courts.

I am in insurance, so I am well aware of the issues with Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's, which is a fatal and dreadful disease few can even imagine having to live with - Crohn's might be about the worst illness a human being can get.

My hat goes off to you for all of the issues you have, and still you come out to play

While it doesn't change your personal situation, what helps me when things go awry - like a hip problem this week from intensely working on my hockey stop - I think that no matter how bad I have it, there is always some worse off.

I think alot of people who are paralyzed at a young age, or that 5 year old iraqi kid some animals set on fire, whose face was severely disfigured...

Things can get tough, but like in hockey, keeping your head up and looking at things around you - like people in even tougher spots - can sometime be a motivating tool to push through when your body wants to quit. I just say to myself: "I'll have plenty of time to rest when I'm gone, enjoy the time while you are here as best you can..."

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01-29-2010, 11:49 AM
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Keep fighting guys as your stories are very inspiring. I have a friend, well actually my buddies wife, who has ulcerated colitis. She was in the hospital last year for a week and was very ill. The problem with her is that she does not take care of herself at all. She parties pretty hard on the weekends. She drinks way more than me and it is all hard alcohol or wine. Also her diet is horrible on the weekends. I can't really speak for how she takes care of herself during the week, but I dont think it is that much better. Her weight is always going up and down but she is always overweight. I keep mentioning to my wife that I can't believe how poorly she takes care of herself. I guess my question to you hockeyfan68 would be, how long can she keep this lifestyle up? Could it eventually make her seriously ill or kill her. Sometimes I really want to shake her and tell her to wake up, but I know she wont care what I have to say. Sorry about the hijack guys.

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01-29-2010, 11:53 AM
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FLYLine27
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A guy plays with one arm in my adult league (from his elbow down). He plays in the top level as well and he is pretty damn good. I didnt even notice till the 3rd period. He can shoot, pass, handle the puck like anyone else.

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01-29-2010, 01:54 PM
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It's interesting to read this.

I'm a 25 y/o who has recently decided to try to learn to skate well and play the game of hockey. I was diagnosed with UC when I was 17 and along with being incredibly nervous about everything involved with learning the game comes increased nervousness because of the disease.

It sounds like my case is more mild than yours at this time but it is an incredibly horrible experience when I go through those weeks and months of being symptomatic.

I'm glad to know it's possible to have fun playing the game with UC and I hope that I'm able to do so.


Thanks for the post.

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01-29-2010, 06:30 PM
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Originally Posted by JMUcapsfan07 View Post
It's interesting to read this.

I'm a 25 y/o who has recently decided to try to learn to skate well and play the game of hockey. I was diagnosed with UC when I was 17 and along with being incredibly nervous about everything involved with learning the game comes increased nervousness because of the disease.

It sounds like my case is more mild than yours at this time but it is an incredibly horrible experience when I go through those weeks and months of being symptomatic.

I'm glad to know it's possible to have fun playing the game with UC and I hope that I'm able to do so.


Thanks for the post.
Well hopefully you can keep it under control and during a flare up I recommend high fiber food. I buy a good multi-grain or bran flake cereal which does the job to prevent as much bleeding and pain as possible.

Don't be nervous about the disease with regards to playing hockey as it is going to do what it does whether you are playing or not. As far as I know playing doesn't worsen it. I play at least twice a week year round and it has not caused anything for me in the way of health troubles. You get used to playing in pain since the pain is there 24/7.

The main trouble with playing is the fatigue factor. dealing with the anemias for me has been worse than dealing with UC.

Most people with UC get it in their teens or in their 20s, not sure why mine came on in my late 30s and now being 41 it seems to have remissioned for the most part which makes life easier to deal with.

A guy I know (not very well but see sometimes) works at a rink around here. he doesn't play hockey .... he recently suffered a perforated intestine because of UC damage and fecal matter seeped into his abdomin after which he got a very serious bacterial infection and almost died. They removed the section of intestine (bowel resection) through surgery which is a rather harsh surgery to heal from. He had to be on an IV only feeding and water because nothing can be in the intestines for a few weeks until it heals. I could not imagine 3 meals a day through an IV bag and water too.

The disease has a wide range of severity and varies for each person apparently. I read that up to 40% (couldn't find hard factual numbers) of people with UC eventually need a colostomy bag or a bowel resection surgery and it is mainly during old age as a senior citizen. Whatever happens with me happens I cannot do much more than what I am now and just hope for the best.

I'll play with a bag anyway I already know that just don't anyone lay me out with a hip check cuzz you'll be cleaning the mess not me.


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Originally Posted by FLYLine24 View Post
A guy plays with one arm in my adult league (from his elbow down). He plays in the top level as well and he is pretty damn good. I didnt even notice till the 3rd period. He can shoot, pass, handle the puck like anyone else.
That is awesome ... we knew a kid that had one arm in school and he was amazing like that. That rules in so many ways.

I've seen baseball players like that who either pitched or hit well with that.

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Originally Posted by ChiTownHawks View Post
Keep fighting guys as your stories are very inspiring. I have a friend, well actually my buddies wife, who has ulcerated colitis. She was in the hospital last year for a week and was very ill. The problem with her is that she does not take care of herself at all. She parties pretty hard on the weekends. She drinks way more than me and it is all hard alcohol or wine. Also her diet is horrible on the weekends. I can't really speak for how she takes care of herself during the week, but I dont think it is that much better. Her weight is always going up and down but she is always overweight. I keep mentioning to my wife that I can't believe how poorly she takes care of herself. I guess my question to you hockeyfan68 would be, how long can she keep this lifestyle up? Could it eventually make her seriously ill or kill her. Sometimes I really want to shake her and tell her to wake up, but I know she wont care what I have to say. Sorry about the hijack guys.
Wow ... where do I start with this one. YES the side effects of anemias from UC WILL kill someone if left untreated. Not everyone has the same anemia issues however so she should see a doctor at least to find out if she is anemic. The symptoms are easy to look up on Google from legit medical websites.

UC will get worse if not treated as well if it is flaring up badly. I was prescribed some antibiotics which helped during my worst flare up I had.

The thing with UC is sometimes it can leave you alone for sometimes years and then it flares up again. Some people have troubles every month or two.

She would be specific to herself and would know what is going on. From your description of her weight loss and gain again that it is flaring up and then calming down again. The damaged part of anyone with UC causes waste to pass through too quickly and it causes weight loss.

Even if the only thing she can do is go to the emergency room she should at least get treated for any current flare up. The ER however are not disease specific and she should see a family practicioner type doctor at least who can send her for whatever tests are needed.

I have no answer for someone who refuses to take care of herself only she can do anything about it. But yeah she should know that the side effects of UC are indeed life threatening. At my worst I had chest pain and a swollen liver from lack of B12 and blood supply. My heart and the rest of my organs were getting oxygen starved and about ready to fail causing death.

Look up B12 deficiency and Pernicious Anemia and read what it does. It can lead to mental illness even from nerve damage. One experieinces all of these symptoms before finally dying so there is time to treat it if she gets sick. it isn't like she will drop dead, the person knows something is wrong when they start to get sick.

Tell her to take it seriously!

Quote:
Originally Posted by nystromshairstylist View Post
Man, Hockey68, you should get a medal for fighting through illnesses that would have put most people on their A$$, let alone out of hockey.

I have a mild form of ischemia colitis, but avoid certain foods and tight clothing that will exacerbate it. Also, it is crucial that with ANY form of colitis you must go to bed early, and avoid caffeine and alcohol, plus many types of foods (chocolate, etc.).

I also get ocular migraines so avoiding bright lights is a MUST as I literally go blind when the migraine attacks - so night driving is a challenge as I cannot look into the headlights of oncoming vehicles. This also means my office fluorescent lights must be kept off/very low.

The rest of my issues are mostly a bum left knee and left shoulder problems - too much pickup basketball played on concrete city courts.

I am in insurance, so I am well aware of the issues with Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's, which is a fatal and dreadful disease few can even imagine having to live with - Crohn's might be about the worst illness a human being can get.

My hat goes off to you for all of the issues you have, and still you come out to play

While it doesn't change your personal situation, what helps me when things go awry - like a hip problem this week from intensely working on my hockey stop - I think that no matter how bad I have it, there is always some worse off.

I think alot of people who are paralyzed at a young age, or that 5 year old iraqi kid some animals set on fire, whose face was severely disfigured...

Things can get tough, but like in hockey, keeping your head up and looking at things around you - like people in even tougher spots - can sometime be a motivating tool to push through when your body wants to quit. I just say to myself: "I'll have plenty of time to rest when I'm gone, enjoy the time while you are here as best you can..."
I am amazed at how many people have some form of IBD (Inflamatory Bowel Disease). I was reading about how the disease is more prominant in the western world mainly in the developed countries around the world while 3rd world countries have way fewer cases of it.

They think this disease is linked in the same way the other autoimmune diseases are activated and that is by getting some sort of serious infection while a child like chicken pox or scarlet fever. I had both as a child as well as a serious leg infection where i almost lost a leg.

Other autoimmune diseases linked to bacterias and viruses are more famous like Multiple Sclerosis and Autism. Your immune sytem attacks you and causes damage. The nerve damage I suffered was caused by a lack of B12 and my blood level was low which caused the protective sheathing of my nerves to be damaged an exposed the nerves to immune system attack just like with MS. Once I got my blood good my nerves started healing, the trouble is the doctor told me nerves heal at one millimeter a day and some nerves in the body are 2 feet long. he explained that whatever doesn't heal after 2 years probably won't ever and is permanent. i have some that is permanent or close to it acording to his time table.

Your migraines ... wow that sucks. Any neurological symptoms are very frightening when they happen. You know seeing flashes of lights and colors is something not normal and it scares you quickly I might add.

I see flashes of white light in the center of my viewing in the dark only or with eyes closed and only when looking side to side.

Your hip pain, hip pain sucks ... playing sport in pain is a tough thing to do and i tip my cap to you for still doing it anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Jesus, that sounds horrible!

I have a mystery cough. It developed after I had bronchitis 2.5 years ago. At that time I had been playing hockey for a year as an adult (played through junior high then stopped), and I was getting exponentially better.

After I was sick, any time I performed any aerobic activity, I start hacking and coughing. My lung function dropped quite a bit, and any time I try and push myself physically (to get in better shape, to get stronger, to lose weight), I get very sick with bronchitis, a sinus infection, or something similar. So I've plateaued.

The docs said it was sports asthma, but the inhalers never worked. It gets a little better after some antibiotics, but it gets worse after I'm sick. It just never goes away, and it sucks.

Last Sunday, I was going to play a double header of games. I play up a level and we had a short bench, so I was working really hard. I leave the game with my gear on (take off skates, put on shoes), head out to my car, and drive to the next rink.

A few miles down the road, I start coughing, then I get lightheaded, then I have trouble breathing, then all my limbs go numb. I pull off to a hospital to see if they had albuterol, but instead they take me to the ER. They do all the tests, but after an hour it turns out I'm technically healthy, just pushed myself too hard and my lungs can't keep up.

So at the end of the day, I'm a 26-year-old who can barely play hockey without getting sick, won't ever get in better shape, and there's an outside chance I have a debilitating lung disease that is common only to people who've smoked for 40 years.
Wow that sounds terrible! I can say I have no issues with breathing and playing with that would make it tough to continue playing hockey. You are pretty strong to play with that honestly.

I hope you do not get any lung disease like Emphysema or whatever else. My disease puts me at a higher risk for colon Cancer so I can relate in that aspect of fearing a more severe malignant disease. having that in the back of your brain reminding you of your mortality is a tough thing to have there everyday.

You seem to be dealing with it well though and you are living life. keep going as long as you can.

I'm hunting for outdoor ice tomorrow afternoon here because I have to play, I don't want to wait until the day comes I can no longer play and feel like crap that I did not take advantage and play as often as possible while I still could.


Last edited by Hockeyfan68: 01-29-2010 at 07:14 PM.
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01-29-2010, 06:50 PM
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Two words - Fernando Pisani

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fernando_Pisani

Quote:
Prior to the start of the 200708 season, he was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis, sidelining him for the first 26 games of the campaign.[9] He returned to the Oilers lineup on December 2, 2007,[10] and was nominated for the Bill Masterton Trophy given for perseverance and dedication to hockey at the end of the season.[11]
He's also become a spokesman for UC.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_b9tyzBA4s

I don't know what the odds are, but you could try getting in touch with him through the Oilers organization. Just to talk with someone who's gone through something similar to what you have and maybe get advice.

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01-29-2010, 07:18 PM
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Hockeyfan68
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Originally Posted by nullterm View Post
Two words - Fernando Pisani

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fernando_Pisani



He's also become a spokesman for UC.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_b9tyzBA4s

I don't know what the odds are, but you could try getting in touch with him through the Oilers organization. Just to talk with someone who's gone through something similar to what you have and maybe get advice.
I'm familiar with his condition, I watch the NHL Network and they were running spots about it for quite some time and still do.

I used to write to the Boston bruins when I was 20 or so to get autographs on hockey cards. Most of them signed them and returned them in a SASE I had sent. I believe the NHL players get all their mail unless they request not to be bothered with it. I saw last year a film clip in a story about Tim Thomas and he was in bed in a hotel room reading fan mail.

I would bet if i wrote him a letter C/O the team he may have some advice.

I do not play a high tempo competetive game any longer at my age so when fatigued I can just shorten shifts and work through it. At the NHL level it can cost him his job so i have a lot of recpect for him for sure because I know there are days he just doesn't have it yet still works hard.

I hope Oilers fans respect that.


Last edited by Hockeyfan68: 01-30-2010 at 12:45 AM.
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01-29-2010, 11:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
I hope Oilers fans recpect that.
This one certainly does. I'd like to see him stick with the Oil till he's ready to retire (for the right reasons).

Fernie is a big fan favorite in Edmonton, also a local boy.

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01-30-2010, 10:46 AM
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Well I don't play yet, but I will!

I'm a 20 year old female with a whole range of visual impairment issues, which basically mean I legally cannot drive.

I don't live close to any ice which is why I don't play yet but I'm hoping to move closer to a rink in the next 18-24 months.

A lecturer at university plays and he fully believes that if I give it a try, even though I might have problems, I should be OK to pick it up

This all started from filming hockey (which I still do )

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01-30-2010, 05:01 PM
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There is a player that plays on the local university team that apparently only has one eye. I can't confirm it is true but I think that is pretty unreal.

All of these stories are incredible. I feel like a complete pansy since I've missed games with bruised hand/thumb/foot. I'm sure I'll play a game injured more than that. I'm only 17 so I have long ways to go.

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01-31-2010, 12:01 AM
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There is a player that plays on the local university team that apparently only has one eye. I can't confirm it is true but I think that is pretty unreal.

All of these stories are incredible. I feel like a complete pansy since I've missed games with bruised hand/thumb/foot. I'm sure I'll play a game injured more than that. I'm only 17 so I have long ways to go.
Hey if it hurts no sense in injuring it further with foolish pride. One thing I always ALWAYS do is jam my thumb into someone and either the thumb knuckle hurts for 3 weeks or the thumbnail feels like it lifted and it has blood. I even trim my nail short which helped but I seem to manage that injury once or twice a year.

I'm okay by the way with my illness when everything is good and treatment is keeping things in check. It is when the body chemistry changes on its own once in a while due to a flare up that it becomes a huge hassle.

I can say though that it takes a pretty bad bruise for me not to play. I have had those though so don't feel like a pansy. It is hard to play with a bruised hand or foot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VickiUKHockeyFan View Post
Well I don't play yet, but I will!

I'm a 20 year old female with a whole range of visual impairment issues, which basically mean I legally cannot drive.

I don't live close to any ice which is why I don't play yet but I'm hoping to move closer to a rink in the next 18-24 months.

A lecturer at university plays and he fully believes that if I give it a try, even though I might have problems, I should be OK to pick it up

This all started from filming hockey (which I still do )
I remember your post in here earlier this summer, you were looking to get into roller hockey or ice hockey in England and needed equipment advice.

Visual impairment issues ... good luck with that. I think you can play as well but you should take a moment before playing to let others know about it. They will respect it for a pick up type game and not put you in a spot where you could get hurt.

I was diagnosed with Cortical cataracts last year ... obviously nothing and I mean NOTHING as bad as your condition. Mine can be remedied with surgery by having lens replacement surgery when the time comes. My eye doctor said 'welcome to middle age' ... well thanks a bunch. I also have a vitreous detachment so I have eye floaters which do not bother me other than to see dark 'stuff' float by once in a while against a white wall.

I see halos and auras at night around bright lights and I see double traffic lights because the lens imperfections are refracting light like that.

I see perfectly fine during the day and when I play hockey and was told by the eye doctor that I had 20/20 vision still. She told me i would start needing reading glasses soon and sure enough a couple of months ago I started to need reading glasses as things close in front of my face are hard to make out but the stuff more than a foot away are still 20/20. I will however start to lose contrast and eventually will get a milky blurred vision like looking through fog. Driving at night will not be possible from headlight glare and that is when surgery will be necessary for me.

Does your sight issues have to do with a disease that can be repaired? I hope so ... I think you can play hockey though just take it slow and pace yourself.

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02-01-2010, 05:31 AM
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To answer the question about my eyes, here's the medical info on what I have. This was written down for me so that I could put it on university/job applications etc and it's also come in handy when explaining things online.

I suffer from a range of visual problems, including optic atrophy, left hemanopia (loss of visual field on left side), Nystagmus (involuntary jerky movement of eyes), hypermetropia (Long sighted), Restricted distance vision, but good near vision.

So, unfortunately, not something that can be cured or fixed with surgery. Well, I did have squint correction surgery and that's really helped my co-ordination a lot. But to do laser surgery or something, would be like putting HD video through a standard definition TV, my optic nerve can't process the data, because the optic atrophy means it's thinner than normal, so any surgery to the lenses of my eyes would have no effect.

But hey, apart from not being able to drive, it doesn't affect me too much, and I'm still doing everything I want to, including a film production degree, and filming hockey, so I can't complain, it could be lots worse.

My granddad has cataracts, just been diagnosed, and my gran says she has little floaty things in her eyes, so I've got lots of fun things to look forward to if these things are hereditary! If my mum starts getting them, then I'll be concerned, but for now, I'm just gonna enjoy life, and hopefully get into this hockey business!

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02-01-2010, 11:53 AM
  #15
Hockeyfan68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VickiUKHockeyFan View Post
To answer the question about my eyes, here's the medical info on what I have. This was written down for me so that I could put it on university/job applications etc and it's also come in handy when explaining things online.

I suffer from a range of visual problems, including optic atrophy, left hemanopia (loss of visual field on left side), Nystagmus (involuntary jerky movement of eyes), hypermetropia (Long sighted), Restricted distance vision, but good near vision.

So, unfortunately, not something that can be cured or fixed with surgery. Well, I did have squint correction surgery and that's really helped my co-ordination a lot. But to do laser surgery or something, would be like putting HD video through a standard definition TV, my optic nerve can't process the data, because the optic atrophy means it's thinner than normal, so any surgery to the lenses of my eyes would have no effect.

But hey, apart from not being able to drive, it doesn't affect me too much, and I'm still doing everything I want to, including a film production degree, and filming hockey, so I can't complain, it could be lots worse.

My granddad has cataracts, just been diagnosed, and my gran says she has little floaty things in her eyes, so I've got lots of fun things to look forward to if these things are hereditary! If my mum starts getting them, then I'll be concerned, but for now, I'm just gonna enjoy life, and hopefully get into this hockey business!
I was thinking about your condition here and would recommend playing hockey but with a pickup type team that rented the ice just for fun. Then you could let them know about your issues and set the tone for yourself to adapt. If you do well with your sight then great!

I would also recommend FULL face protection because things happen quickly even in fat beer bellied old men's pickup hockey lol. A hard pass can nick a skate toe cap and jump almost straight up right into your face even for people who can see perfectly.

There are accidental high sticks you would not want to have vision probelms so as to not see one in time to avoid injury.

If you can see things closer to you pretty well that would be good for sure because really there isn't too much far away that you would need to see really.

Your glasses (assuming you wear them) may be an issue. I would recommend a wire cage face protection so it breathes enough for your glasses not to fog up. I would also recommend a head strap for your glases to hold them on obviously.

Good luck anyway and i do not see why you could not play hockey just fine as a recreational thing.

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02-01-2010, 05:23 PM
  #16
VickiUKHockeyFan
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Thank you I've had it stressed to me by this lecturer about full face protection (I've spoken to him about playing a couple of times). Also a nice story (not!) he told me when I first started filming the hockey was about David Alexandre-Beauregard, and his injury, which pretty much scared me silly!

It's definitely something I'm going to look into in the future, so watch this space.

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