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Beer league mistakes and tips

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Old
02-14-2010, 03:26 PM
  #126
The Tikkanen
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Don't walk around the locker room naked-it's disturbing.

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02-14-2010, 10:19 PM
  #127
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Originally Posted by Tikkanen View Post
Don't walk around the locker room naked-it's disturbing.
That and leave your leopard skin pattern thongs that wifey likes at home as well.

I've actually seen that more than once and made fun of them each time.

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02-15-2010, 12:18 AM
  #128
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Haven't read the whole thread so don't jump allover me if this has been said. I don't play beer league yet but one thing my team does that annoys the **** out of me is this


When my team is offside and we have the puck and were waiting for the last guy to get out of the zone, some of my players just shoot the puck in and give it right too the other team. Like is it that hard to pass back to your D and regroup and go attack again?

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02-15-2010, 01:35 AM
  #129
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Originally Posted by MK7117 View Post
Haven't read the whole thread so don't jump allover me if this has been said. I don't play beer league yet but one thing my team does that annoys the **** out of me is this


When my team is offside and we have the puck and were waiting for the last guy to get out of the zone, some of my players just shoot the puck in and give it right too the other team. Like is it that hard to pass back to your D and regroup and go attack again?
That goes in the not very coached category I referenced earlier. Pond hockey type players playing in beer league who do not know the basics. It is unfortunate really because the games could be so much better without ugly plays like that you just described.

Sometimes I cannot even play with guys who use the points ... they ALWAYS shoot on goal from a bad angle down low along the boards for no reason because nobody is open and never looked back at us at the point playing D.

It gets frustrating doesn't it? basic hockey plays are just not done sometimes even by guys who can dangle, they are so used to pond hockey they just hang onto it until they lose the puck because they didn't get a shot on goal like they would on the pond.

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Old
02-15-2010, 05:23 PM
  #130
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Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
That goes in the not very coached category I referenced earlier. Pond hockey type players playing in beer league who do not know the basics. It is unfortunate really because the games could be so much better without ugly plays like that you just described.

Sometimes I cannot even play with guys who use the points ... they ALWAYS shoot on goal from a bad angle down low along the boards for no reason because nobody is open and never looked back at us at the point playing D.

It gets frustrating doesn't it? basic hockey plays are just not done sometimes even by guys who can dangle, they are so used to pond hockey they just hang onto it until they lose the puck because they didn't get a shot on goal like they would on the pond.
See I love passing to the D and charge my way to the net and screen the goalie and maybe tip the puck in. But sometimes the D thinks there Nick Lidstrom and can get the puck through a bunch of bodies, and they get there shot blocked and next thing you know its an odd man rush. I wish sometimes my team would just throw the puck to the corner if they have no options.

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Old
02-15-2010, 06:31 PM
  #131
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MK7117 View Post
I wish sometimes my team would just throw the puck to the corner if they have no options.
Yeah, I know what you mean. In fact, I teach my defensemn to always dump into the corner because that is their job. To keep the puck in the attacking zone. I expect them to pinch and force the puck back into the pressure zone.

Only when we have the man advantage are they allowed to shoot on net from the point. Other then that, they dump into the corner.

Ok, right about know you are saying what pressure zone! Here it is....

Ok, why is it called the pressure zone? It's called that because when the puck is back there, that's when the goalie is most "Under Pressure." Why?

Because he has to keep his eye on the puck carrier. And, if the shooter is behind the net and he has to keep his eye on him, he also has to worry about the open man in the slot. News flash!!!!! if you are in the slot, move around in the opposite direction on the puck carrier. Why?

If the goalie is watching the puck carrier behind the net and he already took a picture of where you are at, if you move after he takes a picture, then he expects that you will be there. So how do you know when he takes a picture...you don't! so move. So look at this picture below. First you will see that the puck carrier is within the pressure zone.

The winger out front is with the slot and open in such a way so that if he receives the puck, he can just "One Time" it into the net. However, if the puck carrier starts to move with the puck behind the net, then you loose the chance for him to pass it to you. The angle of the pass will not work. So to make sure that you stay within the proper angle, if he start to move towards the back of the net, you move to the other side.

Look at this next picture....

As the player moves behind, the goalie will track him as he goes behind. Just at the halfways point, the goalie will shift over to the other post to keep the shooter from behind, from doing a wrap-a-round goal. But what he has done is pull away from the net. If you have a smart winger behind the net, he will pass to you for the open net shot.

Plus, if you stay on the other side of the net and the puck carrier comes behind the net, you force him to continue with the puck towards the corner. Why? If you stay and not move over to the other side, he knows that if he passes you the puck, the goalie has the angle on you. So he might as well throw the puck away.

In this case, he will probably hold on to it and pass out to the point...which is a major mistake. So do yourself a favor and move over so you can get the pass for the open net.

Hope this helps everyone!
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Last edited by Headcoach: 02-15-2010 at 06:37 PM.
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Old
02-16-2010, 09:48 AM
  #132
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Originally Posted by Tikkanen View Post
Don't walk around the locker room naked-it's disturbing.
haha, some guys stay naked a little too long. Just hanging out with their wang out. Luckily most guys just turn around, change, and that's it or if they shower they quickly wrap a towel around them.

Sucks when they start talking and you go to look at them and suddenly you got balls and shaft starring you in the face.

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Old
02-16-2010, 02:20 PM
  #133
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Originally Posted by DubiSnacks17 View Post
haha, some guys stay naked a little too long. Just hanging out with their wang out. Luckily most guys just turn around, change, and that's it or if they shower they quickly wrap a towel around them.

Sucks when they start talking and you go to look at them and suddenly you got balls and shaft starring you in the face.
Maybe they're trying to send you a message?

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Old
02-16-2010, 06:43 PM
  #134
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i am sure it's been mentioned but please don't do drop passes at the blue line. turnover 95% of the time.

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Old
07-21-2010, 03:48 PM
  #135
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A few months back someone posted a video of their beer league team and analyzed their play with diagrams etc. I tried to search but couldn't find it. If you have the link please post.

Thanks in advance!

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Old
08-03-2010, 04:00 PM
  #136
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Great thread. I have a suggestion that's a bit more for everyone else, but I think it fits.

If you're one of the better (or at least more vocal) players on your team, I think it's important to distinguish between these three types of mistakes that you see, and how you respond to them:

1. Mistake of execution - many less experienced players try to do something and fail - whiffed passes come to mind. This isn't the time to get on them for not passing the puck or for turning it over. This is a good time to pat them on the back for having the balls to try to pass in the first place. "I saw you trying to pass that puck instead of throwing it away - nice job. Better luck next time." This way you don't discourage them from trying again. If you tell them not to turn the puck over, then you've just made sure they won't attempt that pass again.

2. Physical impossibilities - if a hot shot speedster skates around your beginner defenseman like he's a road cone, this isn't the time to make comments about "we can't let that guy walk in on our goalie like that!" Because for all practical purposes, your beginner defenseman really is a road cone to that player. Nothing needs to be said here - the beginner knows he got beat. Any negative comment really isn't going to do anyone any good (unless it's to point out that the better players shouldn't leave that beginner hanging out to dry in the first place).

3. Bad decision / habit / whatever. This is the time to break out your player/coach wisdom, and the sooner after the incident, the better. And most poorer players will love to get advice on this sort of thing.

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Old
08-03-2010, 05:07 PM
  #137
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtter View Post
Great thread. I have a suggestion that's a bit more for everyone else, but I think it fits.

If you're one of the better (or at least more vocal) players on your team, I think it's important to distinguish between these three types of mistakes that you see, and how you respond to them:

1. Mistake of execution - many less experienced players try to do something and fail - whiffed passes come to mind. This isn't the time to get on them for not passing the puck or for turning it over. This is a good time to pat them on the back for having the balls to try to pass in the first place. "I saw you trying to pass that puck instead of throwing it away - nice job. Better luck next time." This way you don't discourage them from trying again. If you tell them not to turn the puck over, then you've just made sure they won't attempt that pass again.

2. Physical impossibilities - if a hot shot speedster skates around your beginner defenseman like he's a road cone, this isn't the time to make comments about "we can't let that guy walk in on our goalie like that!" Because for all practical purposes, your beginner defenseman really is a road cone to that player. Nothing needs to be said here - the beginner knows he got beat. Any negative comment really isn't going to do anyone any good (unless it's to point out that the better players shouldn't leave that beginner hanging out to dry in the first place).

3. Bad decision / habit / whatever. This is the time to break out your player/coach wisdom, and the sooner after the incident, the better. And most poorer players will love to get advice on this sort of thing.
This is some of the best advice that I've seen in a while. It's a lot easier for other players to blast criticisms to lesser players for mistakes that are not always their fault. It takes a bigger player that is mindful and rewards players that are making mistakes with positive reinforcements, patience and a vote of confidence to keep moving forward. Any time that a mistake is made on the ice, every player needs to look deep inside themselves to remember how it was when they first started and to support/mentor the lesser players that are more prone to making mistakes.

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Old
08-03-2010, 07:50 PM
  #138
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtter View Post
Great thread. I have a suggestion that's a bit more for everyone else, but I think it fits.

If you're one of the better (or at least more vocal) players on your team, I think it's important to distinguish between these three types of mistakes that you see, and how you respond to them:

1. Mistake of execution - many less experienced players try to do something and fail - whiffed passes come to mind. This isn't the time to get on them for not passing the puck or for turning it over. This is a good time to pat them on the back for having the balls to try to pass in the first place. "I saw you trying to pass that puck instead of throwing it away - nice job. Better luck next time." This way you don't discourage them from trying again. If you tell them not to turn the puck over, then you've just made sure they won't attempt that pass again.

2. Physical impossibilities - if a hot shot speedster skates around your beginner defenseman like he's a road cone, this isn't the time to make comments about "we can't let that guy walk in on our goalie like that!" Because for all practical purposes, your beginner defenseman really is a road cone to that player. Nothing needs to be said here - the beginner knows he got beat. Any negative comment really isn't going to do anyone any good (unless it's to point out that the better players shouldn't leave that beginner hanging out to dry in the first place).

3. Bad decision / habit / whatever. This is the time to break out your player/coach wisdom, and the sooner after the incident, the better. And most poorer players will love to get advice on this sort of thing.
This is great advice, and falls under the same category as my best advice, 'keep it light'. It's all about fun. There are tons of ways to have constructive dialogue amongst teammates without coming off as scolding and serious. Just try to appreciate where everyone else is coming from and have fun.



Two other things:

1.Don't be afraid of the give-and-go. It seems like often less experienced players will receive a pass, and then frantically look around and force a pass somewhere else or throw it away when the player they just received a pass from had moved to a new position and was open. There's no rule against passing it back. By the same token, when you make a pass...make an effort to move to a position where you can support the puck carrier and receive a return pass or draw defenders away to create space for them. Just do...something.

2.Use your whole body. Learn how to control the puck with your skates. If you're going to stop a hard rim around the boards, an errant flip pass, a wildly bouncing puck, etc. that you think you might have trouble handling, don't just wave your stick at it like a magic wand, get yourself in front of it. use your legs, skates, shoulder, beer gut, whatever to help control the puck, move yourself right up against the wall, etc. This way, if you don't catch the puck with your erratic stick flailing, you'll still likely end up with the puck in your control anyway.

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Old
08-08-2010, 12:45 AM
  #139
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- taking the league too seriously... its rec

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08-08-2010, 03:55 AM
  #140
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Originally Posted by dsarch View Post
i am sure it's been mentioned but please don't do drop passes at the blue line. turnover 95% of the time.
One of my first organized hockey games ever I carried the puck into the zone and left it at the point for my center. He blasted it into the goal. If was probably the worst thing that possibly could have happened, since I tried a half dozen drop passes after that and almost all of them ended up being turnovers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryan52 View Post
- taking the league too seriously... its rec
I play very competitively and i don't apologize for it. I do try to be respectful of other people's health and knees, and I don't run around pretending to be Jarkko Rutuu, but I will will dive for a sweep check on defense, I will go hard into the corner on the forecheck, I will take a slapshot even if you are standing in front of me, and Willl battle hard for the puck. I think everyone should be prepared for this in an organized league. If you're just looking to skate around and have some light fun, go to open hockey. Everyone can just go their own speed at open and they don't have to worry about it hurting their "team".

As a guy that's been playing various beer leagues for the last 5 years (since I taught myself to skate). I just have a few general tips.

1. ****. Seriously. Most of the advice I hear is garbage. Except for a couple of people on my team who obviously understand the game, I tune out anything that sounds like advice. Worry about your own game.

2. Stop taking long shifts. This pisses me off more than anything. There's nothing more irritating than listen to teammates in the locker room talk about how much energy you have and how you're always hustling... yeah, it's because I'm out there for 50 ****ing seconds at a time. We had a guy last year that got to the rink late, took his first shift halfway into first period and stayed out there for two and a half minutes. If the other team hadn't finally scored he might still be out there now. I'm also sick of skating back to the bench after a short shift and seeing people waive me back out there because they don't have energy yet. Are you serious? With three lines you should be chomping at the bit to get out there.

3. Please learn to do the following before you attempt to play ice hockey at any level

1. stop
2. stop and take a quick step (usually a backwards crossover) in the other direction
3. skate backwards and pivot
4. crossovers, backwards and frontwards. Crossovers should be strong

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Old
08-08-2010, 10:51 AM
  #141
Frankie Spankie
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One thing I've been noticing in my leagues more and more lately is centers try to win the faceoff to themselves. Always win the face off back to one of your defenseman to keep possession. Don't try to flip it forward to yourself because unless you're someone like Joe Sakic, you're only giving the other team the puck.

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08-08-2010, 12:27 PM
  #142
The Tikkanen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankie Spankie View Post
One thing I've been noticing in my leagues more and more lately is centers try to win the faceoff to themselves. Always win the face off back to one of your defenseman to keep possession. Don't try to flip it forward to yourself because unless you're someone like Joe Sakic, you're only giving the other team the puck.
Faceoffs is a lost art of rec hockey. I see guys go into it with their hands in a shooting stance regularly, there doesn't seem to be a plan of attack and there is almost never a change in strategy if they lose. It's so bad on one team I play on that when they do win it back both of us on D are surprised and it goes out of the zone forcing a regroup.

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08-08-2010, 01:24 PM
  #143
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Originally Posted by Frankie Spankie View Post
One thing I've been noticing in my leagues more and more lately is centers try to win the faceoff to themselves. Always win the face off back to one of your defenseman to keep possession. Don't try to flip it forward to yourself because unless you're someone like Joe Sakic, you're only giving the other team the puck.
I rarely play center but when I do this works for me all the time if the other teams D is playing back off the faceoff dot a good bit.

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08-08-2010, 01:44 PM
  #144
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Originally Posted by Blackjack View Post


I play very competitively and i don't apologize for it. I do try to be respectful of other people's health and knees, and I don't run around pretending to be Jarkko Rutuu, but I will will dive for a sweep check on defense, I will go hard into the corner on the forecheck, I will take a slapshot even if you are standing in front of me, and Willl battle hard for the puck. I think everyone should be prepared for this in an organized league. If you're just looking to skate around and have some light fun, go to open hockey. Everyone can just go their own speed at open and they don't have to worry about it hurting their "team".

I think it's fine if someone tries hard however there is a fine line between being competitive and trying hard and going overboard in a rec hockey game. Some guys get it and some guys don't. That's the problem with beer league hockey. For example I have no problem with the guy who goes hard, battles hard and is competitive. I do have a problem with the guy who is all of that but will make stupid dangerous plays just because it will benefit the team. It isn't life or death out there.

As a guy that's been playing various beer leagues for the last 5 years (since I taught myself to skate). I just have a few general tips.

1. ****. Seriously. Most of the advice I hear is garbage. Except for a couple of people on my team who obviously understand the game, I tune out anything that sounds like advice. Worry about your own game.

Wrong attitude IMO. Not that you should take everybody's advice because your right some people don't know what they are talking about but how about conversing with that guy and let him know the correct way to do things and helping him out instead of just having a bad attitude of "worry about your own game" Good teammates will help each other out and won't take anything personally.

2. Stop taking long shifts. This pisses me off more than anything. There's nothing more irritating than listen to teammates in the locker room talk about how much energy you have and how you're always hustling... yeah, it's because I'm out there for 50 ****ing seconds at a time. We had a guy last year that got to the rink late, took his first shift halfway into first period and stayed out there for two and a half minutes. If the other team hadn't finally scored he might still be out there now. I'm also sick of skating back to the bench after a short shift and seeing people waive me back out there because they don't have energy yet. Are you serious? With three lines you should be chomping at the bit to get out there.

Agreed this is a common problem anywhere you play hockey. If a guy doesn't get the hint I have found the best way is to get a group together and confront the guy and explain nicely why he should be skating harder and taking shorter shifts. Make sure the captain is the head of the "intervention group"

3. Please learn to do the following before you attempt to play ice hockey at any level

1. stop
2. stop and take a quick step (usually a backwards crossover) in the other direction
3. skate backwards and pivot
4. crossovers, backwards and frontwards. Crossovers should be strong

This is garbage. Some people I have seen play would never in their life be qualified to play according to your standards. I know guys who have been playing for 5 years and go to classes, camps, stick n pucks, open hockey etc. all the time and they still can't do crossovers, backward crossovers, stop on a dime, transitions well etc. Some people just aren't born with athletic ability. That shouldn't stop you from having fun playing hockey. Just play in the appropriate league.

////

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Old
08-08-2010, 02:38 PM
  #145
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I`m playing forward the most times and what annoyes me often is

a)everyone (especially the young guys) wants to play center but no one wants to do what a center has to do in his own end, especially when its not working in the offensive zone they just dont do the backcheck anymore

b)wingers should know where there place is in the own-end aswell. dont go after every friggin puck and run around like a headless chicken, stay where you should stay and cover your D

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08-08-2010, 03:18 PM
  #146
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Someone posted this earlier in the thread, but for beer league players that dont know the game positionally and are just starting out, buy NHL 10/11 or whatever and go into be a pro, and follow the arrows around where they tell you to go. Way too many times do players either cherry pick around the d zone, or do the polar opposite, chase the puck around, leaving the points open.

In the offensive zone, this is less helpful, because there is more required. For starters, MOVE YOUR FEET WITHOUT THE PUCK. This will help get you set up so much better. So many times do I have the puck, looking to make a play, and my wingers are just standing in one spot waiting for me to pass them the puck. Always be moving, if youre just going to stand in one place, the defensmen are going to take away the passing lane by the time I am in a position to pass the puck. If you want to stand in the slot for a pass, sont just hangout there, by the time the puck gets there, youre going to be tied up. Stay along the half wall, or behind the net in the corners ready to help out in puck battles, be watching the play, and when you see your teammate just about ready to be in a good passing position, THEN you sprint to the area where you want to receive the puck. This way, the defense doesnt have time to react to you, and they dont lift your stick, block the passing lane, or knock you off the puck because they know its coming. Feets. Move them.

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Old
08-08-2010, 03:32 PM
  #147
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankie Spankie View Post
One thing I've been noticing in my leagues more and more lately is centers try to win the faceoff to themselves. Always win the face off back to one of your defenseman to keep possession. Don't try to flip it forward to yourself because unless you're someone like Joe Sakic, you're only giving the other team the puck.
It's about picking your spots, more or less, but you also have to be a good enough faceoff-guy to do it. When I'm on the goalie's left faceoff dot taking a faceoff, I'll often chip it between the opposing forward's legs and go for the high glove shot. I've got a decent success ratio with it because it's fast enough that the center and the goalie don't expect it. Tied our league final game while 2-men short doing that.

I've seen plenty of guys try it on a defensive zone faceoff, though...not as good a spot given that the defensemen are waiting for that puck to come to them to fire it.

I've gotta echo the "don't take it too seriously" comments...sure, try hard, skate hard, play to the best of your ability...take the shot you're the best at, dive for the loose pucks, hustle on the fore and backcheck...but if you lose, it's not the end of the world and certainly don't dump on teammates, refs or opponents over it. It's a rec hockey league, just go out, play hard, have a beer after and have a good time.

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Old
08-08-2010, 03:40 PM
  #148
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Originally Posted by Tikkanen View Post
Don't walk around the locker room naked-it's disturbing.
Um...what is the point of playing men's league then?

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Old
08-08-2010, 04:35 PM
  #149
Frankie Spankie
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Originally Posted by Semper Sens View Post
Man, headcoach is on fire tonight!

As for my tip, I've been trying to adjust to winger and the best thing I've found to do so far is set a "default" path for faceoffs. Someone mentioned something similar to this earlier in the thread, but I feel it's important to not wait to see what happens and then decided what to do, but rather know what you're going to do pretty much no matter what. As soon as you see the puck hit the ice, you burst as hard as you can along your default path.

For example, on any given faceoff (aside from the defensive zone and faceoffs where I am lined up in the slot and drive to the net) I drive to the faceoff dot or aim for the opposing centre's rear end. This helps my team gain control of faceoffs where neither of the centres win it clean (this happens pretty often in my league) and create quick chances when the other team isn't perfectly set yet. If it is a clean win for either side, I'm generally headed in the right direction anyways. In the defensive zone, of course, you're supposed to head for the point.

This helps me avoid standing around on faceoffs, and when I know what I am going to do as soon as the puck drops, I often get the jump on guys. This is also a good way to draw penalties, since whoever supposed to be covering you probably isn't ready for this in a beer league type setting.
I know it's a bit late but I'm finally reading through all the posts and this is another good one. Don't stand around waiting at face offs, I'm always wing and pretty much attack the defense. If my team wins the puck, I'll be heading for the offensive zone already. If we lose the faceoff, I'll be heading straight for the puck. And if it's a draw, you could scoop it up yourself.

I was actually playing once where the center of the other team won it clearly but it went right in between their defense. I start flying right off the faceoff in the general direction of the puck but the defenseman is still going to beat me. It ended up going right to the goalie and he just moved it to the side so the defenseman could pick it up but he overskated it and I was right there for an easy goal. You never know what's going to happen after a faceoff and you don't want to be caught trying to figure out what to do. Just do something right off the draw and sometimes it leads to great results.

edit - Just thought of another thing that I usually do and have success with although I probably shouldn't do it. When you're chasing a defender into the corner where there is a loose puck, often times they'll make a wide turn and then quickly cut back the other way to try to fake you. When I see people start turning pretty early, say to the left, I just think they're trying to fake me out and cut in to the right at the last second. I have been able to cut several people off and stealing the puck from them by doing this and if they do end up turning the same way, it's not a big deal to lose them because the puck is so deep in their zone. At least it's not a big deal if you're willing to skate hard to get back into position.


Last edited by Frankie Spankie: 08-08-2010 at 05:06 PM.
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08-08-2010, 10:18 PM
  #150
The Spicy Shrimp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackjack View Post
One of my first organized hockey games ever I carried the puck into the zone and left it at the point for my center. He blasted it into the goal. If was probably the worst thing that possibly could have happened, since I tried a half dozen drop passes after that and almost all of them ended up being turnovers



I play very competitively and i don't apologize for it. I do try to be respectful of other people's health and knees, and I don't run around pretending to be Jarkko Rutuu, but I will will dive for a sweep check on defense, I will go hard into the corner on the forecheck, I will take a slapshot even if you are standing in front of me, and Willl battle hard for the puck. I think everyone should be prepared for this in an organized league. If you're just looking to skate around and have some light fun, go to open hockey. Everyone can just go their own speed at open and they don't have to worry about it hurting their "team".

As a guy that's been playing various beer leagues for the last 5 years (since I taught myself to skate). I just have a few general tips.

1. ****. Seriously. Most of the advice I hear is garbage. Except for a couple of people on my team who obviously understand the game, I tune out anything that sounds like advice. Worry about your own game.

2. Stop taking long shifts. This pisses me off more than anything. There's nothing more irritating than listen to teammates in the locker room talk about how much energy you have and how you're always hustling... yeah, it's because I'm out there for 50 ****ing seconds at a time. We had a guy last year that got to the rink late, took his first shift halfway into first period and stayed out there for two and a half minutes. If the other team hadn't finally scored he might still be out there now. I'm also sick of skating back to the bench after a short shift and seeing people waive me back out there because they don't have energy yet. Are you serious? With three lines you should be chomping at the bit to get out there.

3. Please learn to do the following before you attempt to play ice hockey at any level

1. stop
2. stop and take a quick step (usually a backwards crossover) in the other direction
3. skate backwards and pivot
4. crossovers, backwards and frontwards. Crossovers should be strong
Yeah, I gotta agree with Predfan. It might not be particularly fast, interesting, or beautiful hockey, but people who cannot do that sort of stuff still deserve to play.

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