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Beginner's composite stick suggestions

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Old
02-19-2010, 11:37 PM
  #1
nystromshairstylist
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Beginner's composite stick suggestions

I have a Nike Bauer Supreme One 55 wooden stick, but was most impressed in the LHS picking up the composites, which weighed about as much as a feather.

As a first stick I bough the 55 as I used a wood stick - that's all they had back in 1983 - and it seemed like a good one, especially since it was only $29...

But I am tempted to try using a composite, especially since people have said they last much longer.

Is there a good quality $30 - $50 composite that would be a good one to try out?

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02-19-2010, 11:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nystromshairstylist View Post
I have a Nike Bauer Supreme One 55 wooden stick, but was most impressed in the LHS picking up the composites, which weighed about as much as a feather.

As a first stick I bough the 55 as I used a wood stick - that's all they had back in 1983 - and it seemed like a good one, especially since it was only $29...

But I am tempted to try using a composite, especially since people have said they last much longer.

Is there a good quality $30 - $50 composite that would be a good one to try out?

Online yes, at an LHS probably not

Better of with a high end woodie then a low end OPS imo atleast.

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02-19-2010, 11:53 PM
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There are some just slightly out of your price range. You can probably find the Bauer One55 composite for about $60 online, or the Vapor X15 as well. http://www.hockeymonkey.com/bauer-ho...or-x15-sr.html

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02-20-2010, 12:04 AM
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Kind of depends if you use senior or intermediate too. The selection in that price range is a bit higher in the intermediates if that's your style. You should look at a Play It Again Sports for a used OPS that you could try and keep the cost down.

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02-20-2010, 08:43 AM
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AIREAYE
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Ha, you're better off sticking with your One55 woodie or even 'upgrading' to a One75, the One55 is pretty good, Ive used one. If you INSIST on an OPS, try the One55 OPS

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02-20-2010, 09:08 AM
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Jarick
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One75 wood sticks are super stiff, that might not be an upgrade.

Best bet at that price range is a used shaft on craigslist with a wood blade.

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02-20-2010, 12:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsykes View Post
There are some just slightly out of your price range. You can probably find the Bauer One55 composite for about $60 online, or the Vapor X15 as well. http://www.hockeymonkey.com/bauer-ho...or-x15-sr.html
For ten bucks more, I'll probably go with one of the ones you linked to above. I'm looking at composites both for their longevity and lighter weight, as I've read a composite can be expected to last about 3 woodie life spans.

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02-20-2010, 01:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nystromshairstylist View Post
For ten bucks more, I'll probably go with one of the ones you linked to above. I'm looking at composites both for their longevity and lighter weight, as I've read a composite can be expected to last about 3 woodie life spans.
It really all depends on the user, how many shots you take, how much you load etc etc.

A woodie last me like 10 games, others can go a season before it is a noodle.

Performance wise imo you are still better off with a woodie then a low end OPS. Its not going to weigh much less then a woodie. I dont know the prices there but here you can get 3 or 4 (depending on the deal) woodies for the price of a low end OPS.

OPS's you mine as well spend 100$ and get performance for the money. (100$ in an LHS, can spend less online)

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02-20-2010, 11:52 PM
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I have a Nike Bauer Vapor XXII and a NB Vapor XXV. The XXII are non-existent now, however you can still get an XXV for around $50 bucks online. I really like them both, they are good for my wrist shots and have pretty good puck feel. I don't like the composite One55, as I almost can't tell when I have the puck on it.

I too am brand new to hockey though, so this is just my two cents.

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02-21-2010, 02:08 AM
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For a cheaper composite stick look at the older (2009 and back) sticks that are on closeouts.

The One55 composite is actually heavier than the One55 woodie, actually heaver than any wood stick I've used/tried to date. I made the mistake of getting one sight unseen (web purchase) and was very disappointed. Having said that, it's a frickin tank - very very durable but it is heavy.

Like a previous poster stated, a good woodie will be lighter than an entry level composite. Check out the sherwood 5030 line.

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02-21-2010, 07:49 AM
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A really good wood stick is generally better than a cheap composite. Even when looking at close-out sticks, you gotta spend at least $50 to get something decent.

Look for Mission sticks. I know there are still some around online. They are decent enough sticks and pretty cheap now that Mission no long exists.

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02-21-2010, 09:33 AM
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Thanks to all those who weighed in. That's an interesting point about a quality woodie being better than a low-end composite.

After finally getting on the ice last night, I made the following observation, for me, lighter would probably not be better. The puck is far heavier to hit with the stick, whether for passing or wrist shots (I won't even think of trying a slapper for the time being), and the wooden practice ball I use at home is nowhere near the weight of the puck.

This was one of the biggest eye-openers for me out of playing last night - that puck is heavy - and I realized that my arms and shoulders are going to have to get stronger if I am going to be effective on the ice.

My legs were fine from all of the cycling I do, but I thought I could get away without lifting weights and doing upper body workouts - but that will not do. For now, I'll stick with the woodie One55s and Sherwood 5030s, until I get stronger using a composite I think might make it even harder. If the puck feels heavy while holding a heavier woodie, I cannot even imagine how it must feel on one of those featherweight composites.

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02-21-2010, 10:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nystromshairstylist View Post
Thanks to all those who weighed in. That's an interesting point about a quality woodie being better than a low-end composite.

After finally getting on the ice last night, I made the following observation, for me, lighter would probably not be better. The puck is far heavier to hit with the stick, whether for passing or wrist shots (I won't even think of trying a slapper for the time being), and the wooden practice ball I use at home is nowhere near the weight of the puck.

This was one of the biggest eye-openers for me out of playing last night - that puck is heavy - and I realized that my arms and shoulders are going to have to get stronger if I am going to be effective on the ice.

My legs were fine from all of the cycling I do, but I thought I could get away without lifting weights and doing upper body workouts - but that will not do. For now, I'll stick with the woodie One55s and Sherwood 5030s, until I get stronger using a composite I think might make it even harder. If the puck feels heavy while holding a heavier woodie, I cannot even imagine how it must feel on one of those featherweight composites.
Having a heavier stick doesn't make it easier to push a heavy puck on the ice -- actually, it makes it harder. You've got the weight of the puck plus the weight of the stick to contend with, so the heavier the stick the more total weight you need to move. The quicker you can move your blade the harder your shot (assuming your form is good) and the quicker your reaction time in corralling loose pucks. The drawback of having a light stick is it's easier for an opponent to lift but you can offset that by pushing down harder on the shaft.

It took me a few years to make that realization (need for upper body strength) so you're way ahead of the curve there. The more you challenge yourself the stronger you'll be. Upper body workouts will help but practicing your shots in the basement will help much more. Practice as much as you can (work up to 100+ shots per session) and use a heavy stick, then use a lighter one on the ice.

As for composite vs. wood? Wood sticks are cheaper -- that's the bottom line. They're not indestructible but you won't sweat it as much if one breaks because of the low cost to replace them. Composite sticks are surprisingly durable if used correctly. Providing your stick has an appropriate flex for your body weight you shouldn't have trouble with the shaft breaking, though the composite blade will likely chip more easily than a wood blade (most often on the toe).

Oh, and the cheapest composite stick I've ever found is a Montreal (sorry, don't remember the model number). Seems like their sticks are always available in some closeout deal. I've seen senior sticks priced at $40, junior sticks at $20.

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02-21-2010, 11:22 AM
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blueberrydanish
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Usually you can catch REALLY good deals here and there on some websites atleast. Can get a 100$+ stick for about 60$. If you want to keep the price low and don't mind being patient should definitely wait a lil for a deal cause they seem to come up a decent amount.

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02-21-2010, 11:41 AM
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On second thought, you should get a two piece and not a OPS. If I could do it over again I wouldn't have ever gotten that first Synergy...

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02-21-2010, 11:57 AM
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If you PM me I can point you to a site that has used gear buy/sell/trade where you can get some good gear at cheap deals, including maybe even a high end stick for around that range of price.

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Old
02-21-2010, 11:59 AM
  #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wearethegreek View Post
If you PM me I can point you to a site that has used gear buy/sell/trade where you can get some good gear at cheap deals, including maybe even a high end stick for around that range of price.
Why not enlighten all of us...

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02-21-2010, 02:18 PM
  #18
NigelSPNKr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EmptyNetter View Post
Having a heavier stick doesn't make it easier to push a heavy puck on the ice -- actually, it makes it harder. You've got the weight of the puck plus the weight of the stick to contend with, so the heavier the stick the more total weight you need to move. The quicker you can move your blade the harder your shot (assuming your form is good) and the quicker your reaction time in corralling loose pucks. The drawback of having a light stick is it's easier for an opponent to lift but you can offset that by pushing down harder on the shaft.

It took me a few years to make that realization (need for upper body strength) so you're way ahead of the curve there. The more you challenge yourself the stronger you'll be. Upper body workouts will help but practicing your shots in the basement will help much more. Practice as much as you can (work up to 100+ shots per session) and use a heavy stick, then use a lighter one on the ice.

As for composite vs. wood? Wood sticks are cheaper -- that's the bottom line. They're not indestructible but you won't sweat it as much if one breaks because of the low cost to replace them. Composite sticks are surprisingly durable if used correctly. Providing your stick has an appropriate flex for your body weight you shouldn't have trouble with the shaft breaking, though the composite blade will likely chip more easily than a wood blade (most often on the toe).

Oh, and the cheapest composite stick I've ever found is a Montreal (sorry, don't remember the model number). Seems like their sticks are always available in some closeout deal. I've seen senior sticks priced at $40, junior sticks at $20.
The only decent Montreal OPS is the Nitro and its roughly 140$ and not worth 140$

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