HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

Newbie's observations on playing ice hockey

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
04-05-2010, 01:13 PM
  #76
The Tikkanen
Pest
 
The Tikkanen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Yorba Linda
Country: United States
Posts: 6,472
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to The Tikkanen
Out of all the sports I've played I think hockey demands more respect. With baseball you generally don't have any contact with the other players except when you're on base and if you're in a league everybody is generally at the same skill level. Soccer is pretty much the same, all people are on foot which is a huge difference from hockey. If you hit somebody in soccer you fall down on grass and again, everybody is at the same skill level generally speaking. Football I'd guess most people play when they are younger and most careers end with the graduation of high school. When you play pickup hockey the skill levels are all over the place. There could be a guy who was close to mamking it but didn't and he will usually let everybody know his story on the bench. There are weekend warriors, guys who just want to get out of the house and enjoy their hobby, don't care about getting better. Even in league play some teams are made up of friends, guys play in divisions they shouldn't be, you may have sandbaggers and just plain sandbags on any given team. The real reason for respect in hockey is that it is a tough mans sport. You have to be a little off to play hockey, the chance for major injury is there every time you play. And you never know if there is a guy who could pummel you if you get out of line. As for the ice hockey pants-you have to try on every brand out there. Some brands, like almost all hockey equipment-just don't fit certain body types. That is another weird thing about hockey is you have a ton of guys wearing equipment they probably shouldn't be. And the real key to ice hockey pants is they are very comfortable when they get old. New pants are a pain, when they start breaking down that is when they fit just right.

The Tikkanen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-05-2010, 01:36 PM
  #77
TBLfan
Registered User
 
TBLfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 1,148
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to TBLfan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
Lightweight and mobile are what I am looking for. I am over 40 and do not play like I did 20 years ago with respect to shot blocking or throwing body checks. I only need minimal protection for men's league, maybe encountering a good half slap once in a while perhaps or whatever. Our pickup games allow slapshots so some sort of protection would be good but not full all out armor.

The main thing is it has got to be lightweight and mobile, non-restricive is the goal here.

I really wish the local shops had more stuff to check out in person otherwise I would just order something online. Reading the tackla sizing I would use a 36"-38" waist Tackla size 45 X-Large

I'm looking at Bauers, RBK and Eagle pants online now. I am glad you mentioned the eagle stuff, never heard of it other than seeing some gloves posted in here once in a while.
I was not a fan of the Reebok/RBK stuff, they also seemed heavy compared to other retail pants. The pro 520 pant is bomb-proof and they still make the 7000 pant, which is my second favorite pro pant.

The Eagle pants thing is very new, previously they only really made Gloves, bags, goalie gear and for a short time they had sticks made for them by TT.

Keep in mind that the Tackla fit is slim a comparable pant fit would be the Bauer Vapors. While the Bauer Supreme is SLIGHTLY looser in the legs. With Tackla pants, I have to skate with the zippers unzipped to be comfortable... Which may or may not be the case with you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rinkrat22 View Post
Now to TBLfan, are you telling me that my Tackla 9000 pants, (which I love btw) aren't really Tackla's? WTF
If they say Tackla, they are Tacklas... but US Tacklas are made overseas and distributed by Montreal Hockey CO. Canadian Tacklas were made and distributed by Vaughn. Post a picture of the hip area and I can tell you if they are US or Can Tacklas.

Also the inside tag, if it's still there, should give you a hint. This is the tag from my Tackla pants, obviously they are Canadian made.

TBLfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-05-2010, 01:56 PM
  #78
Skraut
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Enter city here
Posts: 10,344
vCash: 500
I've been playing a few games in an organized league. Our team is all adult beginners, and we're playing other C-D league teams who have been together for a while. I'm sure some of these are because we're just playing exhibition games against these teams.

1) Hockey players go out of their way to help newbies. I saw this a lot in the pick-up games I played. Some of the better players made a conscious effort to pass to me because I was new.

We also saw a lot of this in the first games we were playing. The other teams (and the refs) were helping us out in our positioning and giving advice. It was funny playing D, and seeing an opponent coming across the blue-line shouting "You should be closer to me, you're giving me too much space" or to get the puck and hear the ref say "You're clear to skate behind the net, nobody is on you"

2) Just because I can do it in an open skate doesn't mean I can do it in game. Starting from a dead stop and going backwards, as well as backwards crossovers. Can do them pretty well when I'm thinking about it, but when I'm thinking about everything at game speed, I can't get going backwards, and forget to do the crossovers when it would be appropriate.

3) Non Checking does not mean "Non Contact". I needed to learn what contact I could make, and was way too passive at the start.

4) Don't eat even a moderately sized meal before the game. Or you get to taste it again between the 2nd and 3rd periods.

5) Hockey is addicting. I've now built myself a hockey skill pad, and put up a a giant net similar to the netting behind the goal to shoot into.

6) There's always something new to learn.

7) Getting up at 4:30 am on a Saturday to go to a pick up game, getting there, getting dressed, and then realizing you forgot your helmet, really really sucks.

Skraut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-05-2010, 02:35 PM
  #79
jsykes
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: NoVa
Posts: 832
vCash: 500
Hockeyfan68, if you're happy with the way your girdle fits, but just want to go to pants instead of the RH pants, just get a shell for your girdle and call it a day. Nothing wrong with that, you'll have all the mobility and comfort your current girdle gives you and have the regular pant look/feel.

If you need to replace your girdle, again, if you like the girdle idea, there are lots of good ones out there to replace with and get a shell. One benefit of the shell is that if you change teams, its cheap to always match colors if you want to look your best.

Hey, I dont mean to insult you using pants, I just hate the look. Its a pet peeve of mine. I dont think everyone needs or should match all their uniforms, hell, I dont match, but I like the look of a hockey uniform and when roller hockey took off, it just seems like it was a slap in the face to the traditional sport and uniforms were created by So. Cal skaters and surfers that wanted the baggy look.

I've just always been of the notion, if you're going to play the sport, look like you want to play the sport properly.

But hey, with hockey in the US, I'm just glad more and more people are playing.

jsykes is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
04-05-2010, 03:14 PM
  #80
nystromshairstylist
Puck Control Master
 
nystromshairstylist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Deking past you
Country: Barbados
Posts: 738
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skraut View Post
1) Hockey players go out of their way to help newbies. I saw this a lot in the pick-up games I played. Some of the better players made a conscious effort to pass to me because I was new.
This is usually the case, though there are times when the vets will mix me up with some of the other noobs and not pass to any of us, after passing to one of the beginners who showed they could barely skate/can't turn - and is basically a pylon.

I've made enormous strides over the past 6 weeks of 2 open hockeys per week plus one public skate, but need alot more positioning and passing/receiving/shooting work. I may no longer be America's Worst Hockey player, but maybe third...

Quote:
Just because I can do it in an open skate doesn't mean I can do it in game. Starting from a dead stop and going backwards, as well as backwards crossovers. Can do them pretty well when I'm thinking about it, but when I'm thinking about everything at game speed, I can't get going backwards, and forget to do the crossovers when it would be appropriate.
Constant hard drills in public skating and stick/puck sessions has gotten me to the verge of being able to stop having to "think" of what skating move I have to do next in a particular situation. I hope that I will completely lose this mental obstacle and have things flow completely naturally in the next few weeks/months, so that I can focus exclusively on the game itself - esp what the other players are doing.

Alot of the time I used to intentionally skate slowly so as to not have to worry about a collision - and did have a few nasty ones over the past few weeks - but am mentally getting over it as I get better on the ice.

Quote:
3) Non Checking does not mean "Non Contact". I needed to learn what contact I could make, and was way too passive at the start.
This is THE biggest mistake all of us noobs make; we shy away from touching anyone even lightly. Once you build confidence, you can shoulder away and push a little too, plus knock/lift your opponent's stick...

Now that I can just about reach the corners when the puck is there in time to actually compete for control of it, I love the jostling...the key is getting one's skating down.

Quote:
4) Don't eat even a moderately sized meal before the game. Or you get to taste it again between the 2nd and 3rd periods.
As someone with colitis, I eat bland food no later than 2-3 hours before I will lace up my skates. Usually penne with chicken chunks and broccoli in a light butter/garlic sauce. If I want exciting, I'll add sundried tomatoes...

Quote:
5) Hockey is addicting. I've now built myself a hockey skill pad, and put up a a giant net similar to the netting behind the goal to shoot into.
VERY addicting...it is so very annoying to me that summer is soon approaching...

If someone knows of a pleasant city to live in, where the temps stay 20 - 40 degrees all year round, please, by all means, let me know.

Quote:
6) There's always something new to learn.
For sure, everything seemed so daunting to me in the early few weeks, and I still feel stressed going to an open hockey and I see ringers flying around the ice...

What I do is keep my shifts super short and try to stay out of trouble... it is a bit less stressful than before and I can even contribute a little here and there...baby steps...

Quote:
7) Getting up at 4:30 am on a Saturday to go to a pick up game, getting there, getting dressed, and then realizing you forgot your helmet, really really sucks.
I went to one of my beginner level clinics a few weeks back and left my skate foot beds at home... Fortunately, I left so early I could go home and return in time. Now I pack stuff up an hour before I leave for the rink, and scour the apartment for items that could have been left behind.


Last edited by nystromshairstylist: 04-05-2010 at 03:29 PM.
nystromshairstylist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-05-2010, 03:38 PM
  #81
rinkrat22
Registered User
 
rinkrat22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Chicago
Country: United States
Posts: 577
vCash: 500
yeah so mine are the thailand made tackla's. They are however the most comfortable hockey pants I have worn. Thanks for the info.

rinkrat22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-05-2010, 03:45 PM
  #82
rinkrat22
Registered User
 
rinkrat22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Chicago
Country: United States
Posts: 577
vCash: 500
I went to one of my beginner level clinics a few weeks back and left my skate foot beds at home... Fortunately, I left so early I could go home and return in time. Now I pack stuff up an hour before I leave for the rink, and scour the apartment for items that could have been left behind.[/QUOTE]

Try packing your bag, as if you were getting dressed from the feet up.
put your skates in then your shins and socks, jock, pants, so on and so forth. Dont put the next item in until you find and place each piece of equipment in the bag.

I had my kids start doing that when every trip to a rink I would have to buy some piece of equipment that was left at home. Now before you call me a bad father for spoiling my kids when there are 8 skaters on the team, its kinda hard to let them sit out because they forgot something.

rinkrat22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-05-2010, 03:54 PM
  #83
cptjeff
[insert joke here]
 
cptjeff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Washington, DC.
Country: United States
Posts: 8,757
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by nystromshairstylist View Post

I went to one of my beginner level clinics a few weeks back and left my skate foot beds at home... Fortunately, I left so early I could go home and return in time. Now I pack stuff up an hour before I leave for the rink, and scour the apartment for items that could have been left behind.
Keep all your **** in one place and you won't have that problem.

cptjeff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-05-2010, 05:12 PM
  #84
rinkrat22
Registered User
 
rinkrat22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Chicago
Country: United States
Posts: 577
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
Keep all your **** in one place and you won't have that problem.
or you could just do that^^^

rinkrat22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-05-2010, 05:30 PM
  #85
thedonger
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 991
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
Lightweight and mobile are what I am looking for. I am over 40 and do not play like I did 20 years ago with respect to shot blocking or throwing body checks. I only need minimal protection for men's league, maybe encountering a good half slap once in a while perhaps or whatever. Our pickup games allow slapshots so some sort of protection would be good but not full all out armor.

The main thing is it has got to be lightweight and mobile, non-restricive is the goal here.

I really wish the local shops had more stuff to check out in person otherwise I would just order something online. Reading the tackla sizing I would use a 36"-38" waist Tackla size 45 X-Large

I'm looking at Bauers, RBK and Eagle pants online now. I am glad you mentioned the eagle stuff, never heard of it other than seeing some gloves posted in here once in a while.
tackla size 45 is JR X-large. Sr. X-large would be around 54-56 i believe.

thedonger is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
04-05-2010, 05:36 PM
  #86
nystromshairstylist
Puck Control Master
 
nystromshairstylist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Deking past you
Country: Barbados
Posts: 738
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by rinkrat22 View Post
Try packing your bag, as if you were getting dressed from the feet up.put your skates in then your shins and socks, jock, pants, so on and so forth. Dont put the next item in until you find and place each piece of equipment in the bag.

I had my kids start doing that when every trip to a rink I would have to buy some piece of equipment that was left at home. Now before you call me a bad father for spoiling my kids when there are 8 skaters on the team, its kinda hard to let them sit out because they forgot something.
That is a good idea, I will def do that from now on.

I have a hard enough time keeping my own stuff straight, my hat is off to those who must pack for several kids, I cannot even fathom how to accomplish that. I have 2 myself, but I leave it to the wife to deal with packing the kids' stuff for trips, etc. It is just beyond my skill set ;(

nystromshairstylist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-05-2010, 05:38 PM
  #87
nystromshairstylist
Puck Control Master
 
nystromshairstylist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Deking past you
Country: Barbados
Posts: 738
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
Keep all your **** in one place and you won't have that problem.
We live in a city apartment, so there is no one place large enough to hang everything together to dry out and store. I have to keep some items in different closets because of space...


Last edited by nystromshairstylist: 04-06-2010 at 12:24 AM.
nystromshairstylist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-05-2010, 11:02 PM
  #88
Hockeyfan68
Registered User
 
Hockeyfan68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lewiston, ME USA
Country: United States
Posts: 2,418
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBLfan View Post
I was not a fan of the Reebok/RBK stuff, they also seemed heavy compared to other retail pants. The pro 520 pant is bomb-proof and they still make the 7000 pant, which is my second favorite pro pant.

The Eagle pants thing is very new, previously they only really made Gloves, bags, goalie gear and for a short time they had sticks made for them by TT.

Keep in mind that the Tackla fit is slim a comparable pant fit would be the Bauer Vapors. While the Bauer Supreme is SLIGHTLY looser in the legs. With Tackla pants, I have to skate with the zippers unzipped to be comfortable... Which may or may not be the case with you.



If they say Tackla, they are Tacklas... but US Tacklas are made overseas and distributed by Montreal Hockey CO. Canadian Tacklas were made and distributed by Vaughn. Post a picture of the hip area and I can tell you if they are US or Can Tacklas.

Also the inside tag, if it's still there, should give you a hint. This is the tag from my Tackla pants, obviously they are Canadian made.
Well to give you an idea both my Bauer Flak and CCM Supra pants have scissor cuts on the inside of each leg because I do not like feeling anything there so the zipper thing would work for me on the Tackla pants and also maybe even the Supreme pants you mentioned if they are looser than the other bauer pants.

I'll find something, I am pretty sick of this pants thing. I went years and years using pants I was not really that comfortable in despite being told that the pants i owned were in fact comfy. They did not feel it to me, the bauer Flak pants are some serious armor but hard to wear and not very comfy.

The ONLY pair of pants I ever had that were comfortable were some 1980s Cooper pants. I do not even recall the model name on them. We still used suspenders in themz days and they just hung there perfectly and were non restrictive BUT also not as bullet proof.

Hockeyfan68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-06-2010, 01:47 AM
  #89
SabresFreak97
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Cheektovegas, NY
Posts: 488
vCash: 500
See when I play I ask myself these questions:
  1. Does this fit right
  2. How is my mobility
  3. Will this protect me
  4. Anything I'm missing
  5. Who wants the foil

I don't care how anyone looks. Just as long as they're protected. Heck we got guys that wear football pads(thigh) with shorts with Knee pads in some of our pick up games.

SabresFreak97 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-06-2010, 02:40 AM
  #90
TBLfan
Registered User
 
TBLfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 1,148
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to TBLfan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
Well to give you an idea both my Bauer Flak and CCM Supra pants have scissor cuts on the inside of each leg because I do not like feeling anything there so the zipper thing would work for me on the Tackla pants and also maybe even the Supreme pants you mentioned if they are looser than the other bauer pants.

I'll find something, I am pretty sick of this pants thing. I went years and years using pants I was not really that comfortable in despite being told that the pants i owned were in fact comfy. They did not feel it to me, the bauer Flak pants are some serious armor but hard to wear and not very comfy.

The ONLY pair of pants I ever had that were comfortable were some 1980s Cooper pants. I do not even recall the model name on them. We still used suspenders in themz days and they just hung there perfectly and were non restrictive BUT also not as bullet proof.
By the sounds of it, Bauer Supreme pants would be your best bet if you dont mine the spine protector. They have zippers in the legs so you can open them up and they feel as comfy as cargo shorts.

Or go with a girdle and a shell.

Best thing you can do is go try them on... I don't think you'd be happy with Tackla/Eagle pants. When you try some on, mess around with sizes and go with what feels best. The Bauer Supreme series is where I'd recommend you start from but if you bring home CCM, TPS or Mission pants, I wouldn't be totally shocked. I'd be pretty shocked if you went with Tackla, Reebok or Bauer Vapor pants though. I haven't checked out the Easton retail pants but Easton do have a pretty good protective line.

TBLfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-06-2010, 09:12 AM
  #91
Pog Form
Registered User
 
Pog Form's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Toronto, ON
Country: Canada
Posts: 701
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBLfan View Post
By the sounds of it, Bauer Supreme pants would be your best bet if you dont mine the spine protector. They have zippers in the legs so you can open them up and they feel as comfy as cargo shorts.

Or go with a girdle and a shell.

Best thing you can do is go try them on... I don't think you'd be happy with Tackla/Eagle pants. When you try some on, mess around with sizes and go with what feels best. The Bauer Supreme series is where I'd recommend you start from but if you bring home CCM, TPS or Mission pants, I wouldn't be totally shocked. I'd be pretty shocked if you went with Tackla, Reebok or Bauer Vapor pants though. I haven't checked out the Easton retail pants but Easton do have a pretty good protective line.
Bauer Supreme (I have the One75) are quite comfortable and offer a good mix of protection and mobility. And like you mentioned, they have the zippers on the inner thighs if you like the extra freedom there. Like you said, though, the spine protector is a bit of a nuisance. My jersey on my one team is like an XXL and it still gets caught behind the spine protector and makes me look like Patrice Bergeron wanna-be.

Pog Form is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-06-2010, 02:39 PM
  #92
Hockeyfan68
Registered User
 
Hockeyfan68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lewiston, ME USA
Country: United States
Posts: 2,418
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBLfan View Post
By the sounds of it, Bauer Supreme pants would be your best bet if you dont mine the spine protector. They have zippers in the legs so you can open them up and they feel as comfy as cargo shorts.

Or go with a girdle and a shell.

Best thing you can do is go try them on... I don't think you'd be happy with Tackla/Eagle pants. When you try some on, mess around with sizes and go with what feels best. The Bauer Supreme series is where I'd recommend you start from but if you bring home CCM, TPS or Mission pants, I wouldn't be totally shocked. I'd be pretty shocked if you went with Tackla, Reebok or Bauer Vapor pants though. I haven't checked out the Easton retail pants but Easton do have a pretty good protective line.
I'll try some stuff on, the bauer Supreme's if they have those. My main trouble these days is finding stuff that is an X-large in the store to actually try on.

It is also hard to do leg overs in the store to see if there are restrictions in movement. I hate buying new stuff lol.

Hockeyfan68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-06-2010, 02:57 PM
  #93
jsykes
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: NoVa
Posts: 832
vCash: 500
Do you not like your current girdle?

jsykes is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
04-06-2010, 03:15 PM
  #94
Hockeyfan68
Registered User
 
Hockeyfan68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lewiston, ME USA
Country: United States
Posts: 2,418
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsykes View Post
Do you not like your current girdle?
It's more comfy than my regular pants but not as protective as regular pants. They are also coming apart and are not very good to begin with. I wear some Farrell compression shorts under them for added padding, I might just get a new girdle (????). I like how the girdle fits right on you and is stretchy. Nothing feels bulky.

As a quick side not I would recommend the Farrell 5 pad compression shorts to anyone who plays outdoors roller or ice.

Basically it is time for a change in either case. Roller pants also have to be replaced when they wear on the legs from shots or skate cuts. it would be much easier just buy a new pair of socks.

I would rather have a traditional pant but need one that is as comfy as what I am wearing now is my point.

This thread gave me some stuff to try out so this is why the boards here are good for players.

Hockeyfan68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-06-2010, 04:50 PM
  #95
jsykes
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: NoVa
Posts: 832
vCash: 500
As I said above, if you like the girdle feel, look at some of those. There are some nice ones out there and they are more flexible in some ways than pants if you like the "tight" feel to them. Sounds like that might be a good way for you to go and the shells are cheap.

Something like the One95 girdle:



Or the CCM Vector Pro:



Both about $85-$90 and shells are about $30-$35. Give top end pant protection with the girdle feel.

jsykes is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
04-06-2010, 05:27 PM
  #96
cptjeff
[insert joke here]
 
cptjeff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Washington, DC.
Country: United States
Posts: 8,757
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by nystromshairstylist View Post
We live in a city apartment, so there is no one place large enough to hang everything together to dry out and store. I have to keep some items in different closets because of space...
In that case, look into the shockdoctor bag, the Grit hockey tower or the warrior funk off bag. They all keep your gear inside the bag while it's aired out. Or make an equipment tree- one of those things that is shaped somewhat like a person and you can put all your gear on to dry out, taking up no more space then you would.

cptjeff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-06-2010, 08:47 PM
  #97
Hockeyfan68
Registered User
 
Hockeyfan68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lewiston, ME USA
Country: United States
Posts: 2,418
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsykes View Post
As I said above, if you like the girdle feel, look at some of those. There are some nice ones out there and they are more flexible in some ways than pants if you like the "tight" feel to them. Sounds like that might be a good way for you to go and the shells are cheap.

Something like the One95 girdle:



Or the CCM Vector Pro:



Both about $85-$90 and shells are about $30-$35. Give top end pant protection with the girdle feel.
You're probably right, a newer better designed girdle just might be best because of the fit I like. I have seen the shells online at places like Hockeymonkey and they look okay to me. i would definitely have to get some of those thin newer styled Reebok socks though. I need them to breathe like the roller hockey pant does on the legs.

The CCM one you posted looks good to me because of the inside of the legs which look like there isn't much in the way there.

Hockeyfan68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-06-2010, 08:59 PM
  #98
jsykes
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: NoVa
Posts: 832
vCash: 500
Additionally, if you still decided you didnt really like the socks too much and wanted to go back to RH pants, you could with a girdle and not feel like you wasted money on pants you dont like.

jsykes is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
04-08-2010, 12:46 PM
  #99
Devil Dancer
Registered User
 
Devil Dancer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Country: United States
Posts: 12,151
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by nystromshairstylist View Post
We live in a city apartment, so there is no one place large enough to hang everything together to dry out and store. I have to keep some items in different closets because of space...
Get a tree!


Devil Dancer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-08-2010, 02:38 PM
  #100
Hockeyfan68
Registered User
 
Hockeyfan68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lewiston, ME USA
Country: United States
Posts: 2,418
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Devil Dancer View Post
Get a tree!

^This^

I need to actually get my ass in gear and make one of these someone posted in here a while back.

http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t...ht=drying+tree

If money is an issue or you cannot find anyone who sells this stuff like around here doesn't.

I'm still spreading everything out on the floor of my bedroom and running a fan to circulate air.

Hockeyfan68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:26 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.