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A defense of Redden (Sorta, I wish he were gone)

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04-13-2010, 07:58 AM
  #1
alkurtz
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A defense of Redden (Sorta, I wish he were gone)

I want to take an objective look at the Wayne Redden situation. In order to do so, we need to remove venom and hatred from our analysis and look at things honestly and fairly.

Let me say right at the start that I was adamantly opposed to his signing and that his continued presence on the team is, to say the least, a rather significant millstone weighing the franchise down and handicapping our ability to sign free agents and make trades. There is no doubt that his signing was a complete and utter disaster. But I feel strongly that the disaster was one not of his own making, but of horrendously poor scouting and management (hey, these are the Sather led Rangers, what else is new?)

At his peak, Redden was a fine, borderline all star defensemen valued for his ability to move the puck and run the power play. He had five seasons of 10 or more goals and three seasons of 30 or more assists. Never a physical defenseman, he relied on his quickness and skating ability to thrive and contribute.

The Rangers signed him to do those very things: play the point on a moribund power play and assume the role of the team’s primary puck moving defender. Here is the crux of the problem and one that is not Redden’s fault. By the end of his time in Ottawa (he turned 31 after that season), it was obvious to most people that he had lost some of his quickness. It wasn’t due to a lack of effort or conditioning; the culprit was simply the onset of skill deterioration due to aging. Though statistically his performance, while maybe not up to his peak years, was still good, he was beginning to struggle. Compounding his problem was the fact that in the new world of the post lockout NHL, quickness was to be more valued than ever. In his last season in Ottawa his struggles became more noticeable and much criticism was directed his way.

For whatever reason, Ranger management did not see what everyone else saw. Though there was much talk about how Redden simply needed a change of scenery, the reality was that he was no longer the defenseman he once was and would never be again. No amount of effort or dedication to conditioning could bring back his diminished and diminishing skills. Simply starting over with a new team was not going to restore his lost quickness. The blame for this fiasco must be placed squarely on the backs of Ranger management and scouting.

In his first season with the team, Redden tried to do the job he was hired for: play the point on the power play and log copious amounts of minutes moving the puck out of the Ranger zone. It was quickly evident that he could no longer fulfill that role. Trying hard to do so, he was frequently caught out of position, was guilty of numerous turnovers and defense gaffs, and became the object of vilification on these boards and at MSG. Worse yet, his quickness diminished even further, his skills eroding at an alarming rate. For any athlete, a loss of youthful skills is inevitable. Imagine for a minute what it must be like to be such an athlete. It cannot be a pleasant experience and must result in many a sleepless night and much soul searching. For some, skills go gradually. For others they go quickly. Redden seems to fall into the latter category. No amount of effort or conditioning can restore what aging takes away. Imagine what it is like for an elite professional athlete with immense pride to realize that he can no longer do what he once took for granted.

This season Redden seemed to come to grips with his situation, accept his fate, and make the transition to a new role: that of the veteran, stay at home defensemen, who skill wise is essentially a third pairing defense first player. He knows that he longer will pull power play minutes, no longer play against the opposition’s best and no longer be on the ice when the game is on the line. Never overly physical, any success he may have will depend on his ability not to do too much and play within his abilities. And frankly, in that role, as a third pair defensemen logging 12-15 minutes a night, he is not all the bad. Of course he makes mistakes: all third pair D do. The problem is he is making first pairing, offensive defenseman money. If he were making 2 million dollars a year, we would probably say that he is a bargain; a veteran D who depends on his smarts and experience to succeed. Yes, he is going to make mistakes and be taken advantage of by younger, faster, and more skilled forwards but that s why he is on the third pairing. Every team has veteran defenseman like him.

What should the Rangers do , stuck with paying an aging, no longer near all star offense defensemen big bucks, who is, in reality, nothing more than a third pair defender?

They cannot buy him out: the cap hit is to great. They cannot trade him: his contract has too long to run and is too large. Hockey is not baseball where you can trade undesirable players and pay a percentage of their salary, thereby increasing their value to other teams.

Send him to Hartford? As long as the current management remains in place that is simply not going to happen. The proviso here is that as long as he remains at his current skill level (a veteran 3rd pair D with smarts and experience), he will likely remain a Ranger. If his skills continue to erode to the point where he is no longer even a valid third pair defender, then we have a different story. Only then will he be sent to Hartford. That time, as much as we might like it, is not yet. The other proviso here is that is Ranger management changes, and by that I mean going outside of the organization to replace Sather, and a GM is brought in with no loyalty to Redden or the track record of previous management, only then would the possibility of sending Redden to the minors be seriously entertained.

What should we do as Ranger fans? We can continue to rant and rave, boo and heckle, until we are blue in the face. All will be to no avail. I think we need to realize that this is not of Redden’s doing. Do you think he wants to play this way? Do you think it is because of a lack of effort or pride? Do you think he is “dogging it” because of his big contract? I say no to all of these questions. What we have here is a classic case of an aging athlete losing his skills quickly. To say that he should retire or return the money due him is just not realistic. Very few (and I mean very few) of us would even contemplate the possibility. This is his last contract before he goes on with the rest of his life. His family’s financial future depends on the money he is earning now.

Face it; we are likely stuck with him for the duration. It looks like he has accepted his diminished skills and role. I think as fans we have to do so also. Worst contract in NHL history? Perhaps. But let’s look at the man here and put ourselves in his shoes. I wish he were long gone, but he is not. Another lesson to be learned here is simple: do not sign any free agent defensemen to long term contracts when they have passed their 30th birthdays.

So am I defending Redden? Kind of. His signing was a disaster that will impact the team for years. I wish it never happened and wish we didn't have him to kick around anymore. But I do think that even in his diminished role, he has a part to play. Dismiss the money from his situation (I know, we really can't do that) and evaluate him honestly. Don't give him an automatic F on your end of year report cards simply because of cannot do what once came so easily (I would give him either a C or C-). Try to understand that hockey players are not simply artificial constructs we see on television or in person at the Garden, but flesh and blood people. Every career has an arc to it: the fault here was that Ranger management signed Redden for outlandish bucks when the arc was trending downward.

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04-13-2010, 07:59 AM
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Wade Redden.

Maybe we should scout this Wayne Redden, he sounds better.

You explain it well, but it really doesnt make a difference. Yes we are stuck with him. But there are other options. Its possible there could be an amnesty buy out during the signing of the new CBA. The Rangers could rid themselves of his contract then. Theres also LTI.

My grade for Redden - C-.

He played better than the previous year, but he was a third pairing defenseman. Thats all he is. He gives the puck away WAY too often and he doesnt make the hard play anymore. His offense is non-existent. He was below average this year anyway you cut it. You are right though, throwing him an F is more an emotional reaction to his salary than his actual play. But he still stinks anyway you cut it.


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04-13-2010, 08:53 AM
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Kovalev27
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management has waived others before. wade redden is not worth 2 million dollars at this point. he should gracefully bow out but if he chooses not to do so he should be waived. simple as that. then if the buyout period does come along in a year he can be bought out. but the right thing to do is tell him wade retire or you'll be sent to hartford. there's no gray area here we signed you to a 6.5 mil a year deal and you scored 1 goal. its unacceptable he knows it management knows it the fans know it everyone knows it. this is will not shock the hockey world. players past not performing get waived bottom line.

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04-13-2010, 08:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Kovalev27 View Post
management has waived others before. wade redden is not worth 2 million dollars at this point. he should gracefully bow out but if he chooses not to do so he should be waived. simple as that. then if the buyout period does come along in a year he can be bought out. but the right thing to do is tell him wade retire or you'll be sent to hartford. there's no gray area here we signed you to a 6.5 mil a year deal and you scored 1 goal. its unacceptable he knows it management knows it the fans know it everyone knows it. this is will not shock the hockey world. players past not performing get waived bottom line.
Let me ask you something. If you had 20+ million dollars coming to you, would you leave it on the table and "gracefully bow out???"

Thats a ridiculous, ridiculous statement.

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04-13-2010, 09:11 AM
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um the only thing ridiculous is your response and jumping down my throat guy.

players retire all the time in all the major sports and leave money on the table every year. 20 million dollars? mike strahan could have pulled that in one season if he would have stayed with the giants. same for tiki barber. naslund walked away from 4 million dollars and plays for free in sweden just for fun. i could go on and on. and they certainly weren't threatened with riding the bus in the minors.

when your time has come your time has come. he's made plenty of money in this league. more than he'll ever need and this last contract was front loaded so he stole16 mil in 2 years.

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04-13-2010, 09:14 AM
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and to go one further. would i personally leave 20 million dollars on the table? of course not i dont' have a pot to piss in compared to these guys. but if i were a pro athlete had made well over 30 40 million dollars in my career and was entering my mid 30s and felt like i was hurting my team my reputation and quite frankly KNEW that i wasn't earning my keep, yes i'd retire. These guys have huge egos and alot of pride. he knows damn well what people are saying about him and more importantly he knows that he's got very little left to give. like i said there's no gray area. he's got 1 goal and plays 6th dman minutes. he signed here to be the number one dman. he's not even close. we gave a 19 year old his job.

now if management came and TOLD ME that i sucked and was either going to let me retire gracefully or ship me to the minors after i had a hell of a career in the nhl. i really might consider just calling it a day.

and one more thing to add. my original post did not say i think wade redden is going to retire. it said i think management should tell him that if he chooses to retire to please do so now or be prepared to go to the minors because we're waiving you. i really don't care if he retires or not.

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04-13-2010, 09:17 AM
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The Wayne/Wade funny aside, the original post is one of the better ones I've ever read.

Personally, I would like to see him waived. I understand that he can't (and shouldn't be asked to) give up the remaining money on his contract, but his play is bad enough that frankly I think we have 6-7 better options in the organization already. Can he cut it as a 3rd pairing Dman? Yes. Does that mean you have to employ him in that capacity if you have a better option? No. So, if I were in charge I would demote him. But I'm not, so...

I have a sneaking suspicion that Wade may find himself waiving his limited NTC (when presented with an "or else you get demoted" ultimatum) to go along with a second tier prospect like Weise or Sauer to Edmonton in exchange for Souray who just burned a whole lot of bridges there.

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04-13-2010, 09:41 AM
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Adding humanity to the situation is a good thing and endearing to a guy who actually has had a hellava career, but look at it from another angle. If we have to respect him as an aging athlete then he needs to respect us and the club as an aging athlete.

Does that means we should be a bit more lenient...ok, but that skill set of his has diminished to such an extent that the only truly humane thing to do would be to bow out. If I was offered 6.5 mill, of course I take it, but with the money he has gotten over his career, do you honestly think its all about the money. He doesn't really need it anymore, the dude is set for life, BUT here's the kicker, I think it is about the money. He can't walk away from the big paycheck, which shifts him from aging athlete who adds vet experience to money hungry guy who won't accept the truth...that you just don't cut it anymore even perhaps as a 3rd pairing defenseman.

I am not in the dressing room and don't know what gets said behind closed doors so we will never really know what the relationship with Sather is like, but he has got to go one way or the other. I prefer if it where on his terms, but we are not a retirement village, we are an institution that wants to win and we deserve better as the fans and are more important than Redden, his contract and his delayed acceptance of the painfully obvious.

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04-13-2010, 10:03 AM
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Adding humanity to the situation is a good thing and endearing to a guy who actually has had a hellava career, but look at it from another angle. If we have to respect him as an aging athlete then he needs to respect us and the club as an aging athlete.
+1

Listen, this happens in corporate America all the time. It's not working out, here are your options to save face...what do you want to do?

The shame of being sent to Hartford, buyout (doubt it happens) or be the most hated hockey player in NY for the next few years (have fun living in NY for that time).

Does he want to spend the rest of his career / contract in Harford? I doubt it. Even if he has the desire to fight it out at training camp, doesn’t he limit us cap-wise in the off season too by limiting how much we can be over the cap when picking up additional players? I think he only comes off the cap when he is assigned to Hartford, can’t do that in the off-season. What a mess.

Even if he thinks he can turn it around next season, if mgmt lets it be known that he won’t get an opportunity, he may bail and get a “staff position” as a buyout for his retirement.

I think there are ways for WR to bow out gracefully with no shame and a shiny new job.


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04-13-2010, 10:36 AM
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I want to take an objective look at the Wayne Redden situation. In order to do so, we need to remove venom and hatred from our analysis and look at things honestly and fairly.

Let me say right at the start that I was adamantly opposed to his signing and that his continued presence on the team is, to say the least, a rather significant millstone weighing the franchise down and handicapping our ability to sign free agents and make trades. There is no doubt that his signing was a complete and utter disaster. But I feel strongly that the disaster was one not of his own making, but of horrendously poor scouting and management (hey, these are the Sather led Rangers, what else is new?)

At his peak, Redden was a fine, borderline all star defensemen valued for his ability to move the puck and run the power play. He had five seasons of 10 or more goals and three seasons of 30 or more assists. Never a physical defenseman, he relied on his quickness and skating ability to thrive and contribute.

The Rangers signed him to do those very things: play the point on a moribund power play and assume the role of the team’s primary puck moving defender. Here is the crux of the problem and one that is not Redden’s fault. By the end of his time in Ottawa (he turned 31 after that season), it was obvious to most people that he had lost some of his quickness. It wasn’t due to a lack of effort or conditioning; the culprit was simply the onset of skill deterioration due to aging. Though statistically his performance, while maybe not up to his peak years, was still good, he was beginning to struggle. Compounding his problem was the fact that in the new world of the post lockout NHL, quickness was to be more valued than ever. In his last season in Ottawa his struggles became more noticeable and much criticism was directed his way.

For whatever reason, Ranger management did not see what everyone else saw. Though there was much talk about how Redden simply needed a change of scenery, the reality was that he was no longer the defenseman he once was and would never be again. No amount of effort or dedication to conditioning could bring back his diminished and diminishing skills. Simply starting over with a new team was not going to restore his lost quickness. The blame for this fiasco must be placed squarely on the backs of Ranger management and scouting.

In his first season with the team, Redden tried to do the job he was hired for: play the point on the power play and log copious amounts of minutes moving the puck out of the Ranger zone. It was quickly evident that he could no longer fulfill that role. Trying hard to do so, he was frequently caught out of position, was guilty of numerous turnovers and defense gaffs, and became the object of vilification on these boards and at MSG. Worse yet, his quickness diminished even further, his skills eroding at an alarming rate. For any athlete, a loss of youthful skills is inevitable. Imagine for a minute what it must be like to be such an athlete. It cannot be a pleasant experience and must result in many a sleepless night and much soul searching. For some, skills go gradually. For others they go quickly. Redden seems to fall into the latter category. No amount of effort or conditioning can restore what aging takes away. Imagine what it is like for an elite professional athlete with immense pride to realize that he can no longer do what he once took for granted.

This season Redden seemed to come to grips with his situation, accept his fate, and make the transition to a new role: that of the veteran, stay at home defensemen, who skill wise is essentially a third pairing defense first player. He knows that he longer will pull power play minutes, no longer play against the opposition’s best and no longer be on the ice when the game is on the line. Never overly physical, any success he may have will depend on his ability not to do too much and play within his abilities. And frankly, in that role, as a third pair defensemen logging 12-15 minutes a night, he is not all the bad. Of course he makes mistakes: all third pair D do. The problem is he is making first pairing, offensive defenseman money. If he were making 2 million dollars a year, we would probably say that he is a bargain; a veteran D who depends on his smarts and experience to succeed. Yes, he is going to make mistakes and be taken advantage of by younger, faster, and more skilled forwards but that s why he is on the third pairing. Every team has veteran defenseman like him.

What should the Rangers do , stuck with paying an aging, no longer near all star offense defensemen big bucks, who is, in reality, nothing more than a third pair defender?

They cannot buy him out: the cap hit is to great. They cannot trade him: his contract has too long to run and is too large. Hockey is not baseball where you can trade undesirable players and pay a percentage of their salary, thereby increasing their value to other teams.

Send him to Hartford? As long as the current management remains in place that is simply not going to happen. The proviso here is that as long as he remains at his current skill level (a veteran 3rd pair D with smarts and experience), he will likely remain a Ranger. If his skills continue to erode to the point where he is no longer even a valid third pair defender, then we have a different story. Only then will he be sent to Hartford. That time, as much as we might like it, is not yet. The other proviso here is that is Ranger management changes, and by that I mean going outside of the organization to replace Sather, and a GM is brought in with no loyalty to Redden or the track record of previous management, only then would the possibility of sending Redden to the minors be seriously entertained.

What should we do as Ranger fans? We can continue to rant and rave, boo and heckle, until we are blue in the face. All will be to no avail. I think we need to realize that this is not of Redden’s doing. Do you think he wants to play this way? Do you think it is because of a lack of effort or pride? Do you think he is “dogging it” because of his big contract? I say no to all of these questions. What we have here is a classic case of an aging athlete losing his skills quickly. To say that he should retire or return the money due him is just not realistic. Very few (and I mean very few) of us would even contemplate the possibility. This is his last contract before he goes on with the rest of his life. His family’s financial future depends on the money he is earning now.

Face it; we are likely stuck with him for the duration. It looks like he has accepted his diminished skills and role. I think as fans we have to do so also. Worst contract in NHL history? Perhaps. But let’s look at the man here and put ourselves in his shoes. I wish he were long gone, but he is not. Another lesson to be learned here is simple: do not sign any free agent defensemen to long term contracts when they have passed their 30th birthdays.

So am I defending Redden? Kind of. His signing was a disaster that will impact the team for years. I wish it never happened and wish we didn't have him to kick around anymore. But I do think that even in his diminished role, he has a part to play. Dismiss the money from his situation (I know, we really can't do that) and evaluate him honestly. Don't give him an automatic F on your end of year report cards simply because of cannot do what once came so easily (I would give him either a C or C-). Try to understand that hockey players are not simply artificial constructs we see on television or in person at the Garden, but flesh and blood people. Every career has an arc to it: the fault here was that Ranger management signed Redden for outlandish bucks when the arc was trending downward.
Thanks, very good post.

The guy is treated like he committed crimes against humanity. He's just a hockey player, not a very good one anymore that our GM, who said he would win the Cup every year with our payroll, signed to a ridiculous contract.

All we hear around here is 'we have to get rid of Redden/Drury/Rosy contacts', yet no one believes the cigar will not continue to make the same mistakes with free agents/player personnel. It could always 'be worse'.

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04-13-2010, 10:50 AM
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No, you can not blame him for not being the player the Rangers paid him to be...

but you CAN blame him for plenty else.

Chris Drury is similarly being paid to be a player he isn't. He is not the 40 goal scorer he was paid to be. HOWEVER, he goes out there every night and does his job, never complains, hustles every shift, sacrifices his body both in front of the net, along the boards, and in blocking shots. He never makes excuses or anything of the like. When he was put on the fourth line, he accepted that role and tried even harder. He might not do everything that he is being paid to do, but you can not question that he is doing everything his body allows him to do to help this team win.

Wade Redden, on the other hand, is the complete opposite. Not once has he showed veteran leadership. Half the time he looks like he isn't even trying. He shies away from a lot of physical contact. When Tortorella scratched him, instead of taking it as a hint that he needs to get his **** together, he instead *****ed and moaned about it to the media.

That's the difference. I hate Drury's contract, but I appreciate and respect the guy for all the effort he puts in and how much he genuinely cares about making this team successful. He would die out there on the ice for this team. Redden's contract sucks, but so do his effort and attitude. Forget about not being productive on the powerplay or whatever. Half of the games he looks like he doesn't even want to be there. That's why Redden gets the hate he does. It goes far beyond the money.

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04-13-2010, 11:13 AM
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Originally Posted by hlundqvist30 View Post
No, you can not blame him for not being the player the Rangers paid him to be...

but you CAN blame him for plenty else.

Chris Drury is similarly being paid to be a player he isn't. He is not the 40 goal scorer he was paid to be. HOWEVER, he goes out there every night and does his job, never complains, hustles every shift, sacrifices his body both in front of the net, along the boards, and in blocking shots. He never makes excuses or anything of the like. When he was put on the fourth line, he accepted that role and tried even harder. He might not do everything that he is being paid to do, but you can not question that he is doing everything his body allows him to do to help this team win.

Wade Redden, on the other hand, is the complete opposite. Not once has he showed veteran leadership. Half the time he looks like he isn't even trying. He shies away from a lot of physical contact. When Tortorella scratched him, instead of taking it as a hint that he needs to get his **** together, he instead *****ed and moaned about it to the media.

That's the difference. I hate Drury's contract, but I appreciate and respect the guy for all the effort he puts in and how much he genuinely cares about making this team successful. He would die out there on the ice for this team. Redden's contract sucks, but so do his effort and attitude. Forget about not being productive on the powerplay or whatever. Half of the games he looks like he doesn't even want to be there. That's why Redden gets the hate he does. It goes far beyond the money.
Do you really think the players around Redden would let him get away with 'just calling it in' ???

Think about it, not the coach, not the GM, the players who he has to look in the eye 80 + games plus practices all year long, you think they would let him get away with it?

Just wake up already, he's an aging player who's game is no longer part of the new NHL. The joke was on us and it was our fault alone for signing him. He tries but his ability is limited. He knows it, everyone who works with him knows it. But if he was just mailing it in there's no way his teammates would sit there and take it.

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04-13-2010, 11:19 AM
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Originally Posted by alkurtz View Post
At his peak, Redden was a fine, borderline all star defensemen valued for his ability to move the puck and run the power play. He had five seasons of 10 or more goals and three seasons of 30 or more assists. Never a physical defenseman, he relied on his quickness and skating ability to thrive and contribute.

The Rangers signed him to do those very things: play the point on a moribund power play and assume the role of the team’s primary puck moving defender. Here is the crux of the problem and one that is not Redden’s fault. By the end of his time in Ottawa (he turned 31 after that season), it was obvious to most people that he had lost some of his quickness. It wasn’t due to a lack of effort or conditioning; the culprit was simply the onset of skill deterioration due to aging.
He was never particularly quick, but as you yourself say, the importance of speed has never been greater than it is in the post-lockout NHL. Not being particularly fast was something he could get away with in the pre-lockout league.

He was also blessed with playing with very talented offensive teams for the majority of his career. His last few years in Ottawa, he played on the power play with the best line in all of hockey.

Quote:
For whatever reason, Ranger management did not see what everyone else saw. Though there was much talk about how Redden simply needed a change of scenery, the reality was that he was no longer the defenseman he once was and would never be again. No amount of effort or dedication to conditioning could bring back his diminished and diminishing skills. Simply starting over with a new team was not going to restore his lost quickness. The blame for this fiasco must be placed squarely on the backs of Ranger management and scouting.
It's the same reason these numbskulls thought that second and third liners like Gomez and Drury could carry a team. It's the same reason that they thought an absolute nightmare of a player like Kotalik was worthy of a three-year commitment. The same reason they committed long-term to minor leaguers like Voros and Rissmiller.

Sather and friends clearly don't get this league, and they obviously can't tell the difference between real talent and players that thrive off of others.

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04-13-2010, 11:24 AM
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LOL @ the defending of redden boiling down to 'face it we're stuck with him'

there is not a single positive to having redden or his contract on this team...if he is still here then expect more mediocrity next year because its nearly impossible to improve the team when you are paying a #6 dman $6.5 mil

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04-13-2010, 11:26 AM
  #15
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I think all the ****ing money he's going to get would numb the pain and embarrassment of being waived.

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04-13-2010, 11:42 AM
  #16
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Originally Posted by hlundqvist30 View Post
No, you can not blame him for not being the player the Rangers paid him to be...

but you CAN blame him for plenty else.

Chris Drury is similarly being paid to be a player he isn't. He is not the 40 goal scorer he was paid to be. HOWEVER, he goes out there every night and does his job, never complains, hustles every shift, sacrifices his body both in front of the net, along the boards, and in blocking shots. He never makes excuses or anything of the like. When he was put on the fourth line, he accepted that role and tried even harder. He might not do everything that he is being paid to do, but you can not question that he is doing everything his body allows him to do to help this team win.

Wade Redden, on the other hand, is the complete opposite. Not once has he showed veteran leadership. Half the time he looks like he isn't even trying. He shies away from a lot of physical contact. When Tortorella scratched him, instead of taking it as a hint that he needs to get his **** together, he instead *****ed and moaned about it to the media.

That's the difference. I hate Drury's contract, but I appreciate and respect the guy for all the effort he puts in and how much he genuinely cares about making this team successful. He would die out there on the ice for this team. Redden's contract sucks, but so do his effort and attitude. Forget about not being productive on the powerplay or whatever. Half of the games he looks like he doesn't even want to be there. That's why Redden gets the hate he does. It goes far beyond the money.
I think that you are mistaking personality for effort. Drury and Redden are different players with differing personalities. Just because someone is quiet and not overly and outwardly emotional doesn't mean he isn't trying or that his attitude is bad.

Granted, though I detest Torts, he did wound Redden's pride and he seemed to play better after that. Hate of a coach can be a great motivator.

I don't see any indication that "he doesn't look like he even wants to be there." He was never as emotive as Cally, as abrasive as Avery, or as intense as many other players seem to be. That was never his style. He was always quiet. Quiet and not outwardly emotional does not equate to a lack of effort or caring.

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04-13-2010, 11:48 AM
  #17
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I was surprised that Torts leaned on him so hard the last 2 games, in particular the last game when he went to 4 D & by passed erilson & DZ. Redden preformed.

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04-13-2010, 11:51 AM
  #18
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Further thought: when someone is quiet yet successful we call him the strong, silent type. When someone is quiet and unsuccessful we accuse him of a lack of effort. When someone is quiet and successful, we applaud his stoicism; when someone is quiet and unsuccessful, we think he needs more fire in his belly.

Don't get me wrong: the thought of 4 more years with Redden is enough to me make nauseous. But I am trying to be fair to the guy.

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04-13-2010, 11:52 AM
  #19
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Even if Redden wasn't as bad as some people claim (which I disagree with), he still doesn't fit on this team. There is nothing unique he brings to table. He's not physical, his offense is non-existent, and he's not a shutdown d-man by any means. He's just kind of... there...

How does he help this team? If you watched this guy play for another team, would you even for one second consider wanting him to play here? I seriously doubt it... even if his paycheck wasn't nearly as big. I think on a cup contending team, Redden, at best, might be a 7th defenseman. Nothing more

Unfortunately, Sather screwed up big time with this one and there is a good possibly that the decision is going to haunt us for years.

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04-13-2010, 11:54 AM
  #20
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We're not stuck with him; we're one move away from getting him off the books for good and replacing him with Volchenkov for 1 or 2 mil less who would be 10x more useful for this team.

Drury we're stuck with. But im actually ok with that.

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04-13-2010, 12:01 PM
  #21
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We're not stuck with him; we're one move away from getting him off the books for good and replacing him with Volchenkov for 1 or 2 mil less who would be 10x more useful for this team.

Drury we're stuck with. But im actually ok with that.
They're stuck with him as there's nothing to show that Dolan is willing to pay a player 26M to play in Hartford.

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04-13-2010, 12:04 PM
  #22
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Originally Posted by SingnBluesOnBroadway View Post
They're stuck with him as there's nothing to show that Dolan is willing to pay a player 26M to play in Hartford.
As ecem said yesterday, Dolan payed Marbury 25m one year not to play at all.

I dont know anything about basketball but thats plenty of dough.

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04-13-2010, 12:04 PM
  #23
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Originally Posted by alkurtz View Post
Further thought: when someone is quiet yet successful we call him the strong, silent type. When someone is quiet and unsuccessful we accuse him of a lack of effort. When someone is quiet and successful, we applaud his stoicism; when someone is quiet and unsuccessful, we think he needs more fire in his belly.

Don't get me wrong: the thought of 4 more years with Redden is enough to me make nauseous. But I am trying to be fair to the guy.
Yep, no one loves the situation, but lets not make it worse and spread lies about the guy not caring and just calling it in.

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04-13-2010, 12:05 PM
  #24
SingnBluesOnBroadway
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As ecem said yesterday, Dolan payed Marbury 25m one year not to play at all.

I dont know anything about basketball but thats plenty of dough.
Marbury was a headache. And a bad guy. Redden's just done.

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04-13-2010, 12:12 PM
  #25
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In the real world, people do not leave 20 million dollars on the table because of what other people think or are saying about them. Strahan and Barber both left the field for tv gigs, so it's not like they left money on the table to go sit on their couch. People who care that much about their reputation do not get caught up in the types of off ice rumors Redden was involved in prior to his leaving Ottawa.

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