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Tipping the puck in front of the net?

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Old
04-22-2010, 05:03 AM
  #1
Splitbtw
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Tipping the puck in front of the net?

So far through pickup I've found I enjoy standing in front of the net at times in the offensive zone and look for a tip. I rarely succeed on the tipping portion of it.

Is it all timing?

Luck?

Just blocking the goalie's view and hoping for the best?

All of the above?

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Old
04-22-2010, 06:34 AM
  #2
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Positioning is key. You have to keep your BODY (not just your stick) between the goalie and the puck at all times. Other then that, it's about timing and a little luck. Tipping the puck is an art form. It will take some trial and error to get the technique down but for the most part changing the direction of the puck is enough. Watch NHL games and how often you see a tipped puck make the goalie have to react for the change in direction. In fact Zetterberg scored one the other night on a shoulder high tip. It was nuts.

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Old
04-22-2010, 07:14 AM
  #3
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I think it's all about body position and hand-eye coordination.

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Old
04-22-2010, 09:06 AM
  #4
Jarick
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Hand eye is huge...one thing you can do is try juggling a golf ball or tennis ball on the stick to improve that. Or if you've got a wall/garage door, play "tennis" with a tennis ball and hockey stick, that would help as well.

The Brett Hull shooting DVD I have says to not try and redirect the puck so much as just get a little piece of it. Hit it too hard and the puck will veer wide of the net, but just making contact a bit will change the angle on the goalie.

I don't screen the goalie much (I hope not...I'm a defenseman), but the coaches I've worked with said to not be right on the goalie, but to get out a few feet in front. He can look around you if you're right on him, but out in front he can't move you or anything.

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04-22-2010, 12:00 PM
  #5
Gino 14
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Another problem you will run into is that most players in pickup want to score themselves so they don't keep the puck down on the ice where they should, they try and keep it up in the air thinking it improves their chances of scoring. A straight high shot is a goalies' dream, they can track it all the way. Low shots are hard to follow and if deflected are almost impossible for a goalie to react quickly enough to to make a stop.

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Old
04-22-2010, 01:33 PM
  #6
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All timing and eye-hand coordination as stated already in the thread BUT you use a less is more technique, I see a lot of guys try to swipe at it with a 3 foot range of motion when the best way is to follow it with your eyes and move your stick only as far as it needs to go to reach the puck without over waving at it if that makes sense.

You also need to stop trying to hit it with your shaft ... focus on using your blade and getting in position while it comes to you to make sure the blade is tapping it and not the shaft. I had a hard time tipping shots in highschool until a coach showed me how to do it and then it made a 90% better increase doing it this way.

You see many pros who can tip shots in with their shaft though, all I am saying is for YOU as not being a pro practice with the blade and use a less is more approach in the swinging swiping motion.

This is something I am very good at, more so before my cataracts started up but whatever. I also just started using reading glasses and some loss of far off vision is starting, I think I need glasses now lol ... GREAT! Getting old is fun lemme tell ya.

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04-22-2010, 02:15 PM
  #7
HowToHockey
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Here's what worked for me

I start with the blade of my stick a bit lower than waist height, in front of me, and where I think the puck will be coming.

As the shot travels towards the net, I draw my stick back, trying to trace the path of the puck as it travels, then when the puck is close, I change the angle of the blade as needed.

It has helped me increase tips big time!

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Old
04-22-2010, 03:05 PM
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beavboyz View Post
Here's what worked for me

I start with the blade of my stick a bit lower than waist height, in front of me, and where I think the puck will be coming.

As the shot travels towards the net, I draw my stick back, trying to trace the path of the puck as it travels, then when the puck is close, I change the angle of the blade as needed.

It has helped me increase tips big time!
Funny how different ways of saying things say the same thing, my version has more bag of wind typed in it though lmao @ me.

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Old
04-22-2010, 03:09 PM
  #9
AIREAYE
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This is my favourite play in hockey, this and shot blocking I cant snipe or anything so standing in front of the net is the easiest, best thing i recommend, mentioned before, is putting your body in b/w puck and goalie and not your stick

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Old
04-22-2010, 03:19 PM
  #10
Badger36
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Other than being in exactly the right place at exactly the right time, its all luck.
Even if the net is wide open, your odds of being able to tip the puck in are fairly remote. The pros make it look easy but for us mere mortals its mostly all about luck.

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04-22-2010, 03:25 PM
  #11
Hockeyfan68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoBucky View Post
Other than being in exactly the right place at exactly the right time, its all luck.
Even if the net is wide open, your odds of being able to tip the puck in are fairly remote. The pros make it look easy but for us mere mortals its mostly all about luck.
Well respectfully that isn't true, it is luck for people who do not practice it. It is a skill just like any other in hockey.

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Old
04-22-2010, 03:32 PM
  #12
noobman
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The onus is on the shooter as much as it is on you.

If the shooter is going to try and go top shelf, shoot the puck directly at your body, or launch a floater... you're going to have a hard time deflecting the puck. A hard, low shot is the prime shot for a deflection.


I like to keep my stick on the ice b/c it gives the shooter a target and encourages him or her to shoot a lower shot. As for the actual deflection, it's more than just making contact. When you're learning to deflect shots you'll probably just end up blocking a lot of them for the goalie. You need some fairly strong-yet-soft hands to deflect a puck properly.

The trick is to absorb as little of the shot power through your stick as you can. Try to rotate your stick in the direction you want to deflect the puck as it's coming to you. IE: if the shot is coming low towards your blade, try to turn your blade upwards as the puck is hitting your stick. If you do it too soon you won't actually change the direction the way you want to, and if you do it too late you'll be absorbing the shot. If you graze the puck like this, you'll be sending the puck off erratically. The same holds true with how stiff you keep your stick. You need to hold it firmly in your hands while keeping your wrists loose to move the stick and guide the shot. No puns intended.

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Old
04-22-2010, 03:40 PM
  #13
Hockeyfan68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noobman View Post
The onus is on the shooter as much as it is on you.

If the shooter is going to try and go top shelf, shoot the puck directly at your body, or launch a floater... you're going to have a hard time deflecting the puck. A hard, low shot is the prime shot for a deflection.


I like to keep my stick on the ice b/c it gives the shooter a target and encourages him or her to shoot a lower shot. As for the actual deflection, it's more than just making contact. When you're learning to deflect shots you'll probably just end up blocking a lot of them for the goalie. You need some fairly strong-yet-soft hands to deflect a puck properly.

The trick is to absorb as little of the shot power through your stick as you can. Try to rotate your stick in the direction you want to deflect the puck as it's coming to you. IE: if the shot is coming low towards your blade, try to turn your blade upwards as the puck is hitting your stick. If you do it too soon you won't actually change the direction the way you want to, and if you do it too late you'll be absorbing the shot. If you graze the puck like this, you'll be sending the puck off erratically. The same holds true with how stiff you keep your stick. You need to hold it firmly in your hands while keeping your wrists loose to move the stick and guide the shot. No puns intended.
Yep agreed ... and best setup is about 1 to 3 feet off the ice.

My favorite though is the flat on the ice "shass" (shot-pass).

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Old
04-22-2010, 03:41 PM
  #14
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Ah, my favorite topic...

I didn't start with hockey until a bit later than normal (I think I was 12 or 13), so I had to adapt the best way I knew how. I played quite a bit of baseball and was an excellent bunter, which helped for this reason. When bunting, the idea is to fix the bat in your hands, and if a pitch is outside of where it's positioned, you must move your body to compensate. A low pitch requires a squat, an outside pitch requires a half-step forward, and so on. Most times that a guy pops up a bunt is because he moves the bat instead of his body.

In hockey, I would almost fix the stick to a certain position and stay in line between the goalie and the shooter. I'm most comfortable with deflecting a low shot, so I'd keep the blade somewhere around knee level and have our defensemen get lower shots on goal so there'd still be a rebound if I coudn't get the stick on it. The blade never really went outside the width of my knees since it created too erratic of a tip.

I also tend to use a fairly open toe on the stick. Most of my shots would come from within 10 feet (and the majority were even closer than that), and it also meant that a deflection would tend to rise rather than drop or change direction laterally.

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04-22-2010, 05:12 PM
  #15
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It's funny, I guess, but the deflection/tip in goals that get by me are usually from my own team-mates trying to stop an incoming shot. Their technique seems perfect! Damn shame they can't even come close to netting one in the other end.

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04-22-2010, 08:31 PM
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maci4life
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here's a way to practice hand eye.

use a golf ball and just wrist it against a wall. hopefully it'll come back hard enough and in the air but when it does, try to make contact with the stick. golf balls move quick and are bouncy enough to give you some trouble.

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Old
04-22-2010, 09:06 PM
  #17
budster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maci4life View Post
here's a way to practice hand eye.

use a golf ball and just wrist it against a wall. hopefully it'll come back hard enough and in the air but when it does, try to make contact with the stick. golf balls move quick and are bouncy enough to give you some trouble.
I was gonna say a racquetball but yeah same idea.

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Old
04-22-2010, 09:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Hand eye is huge...one thing you can do is try juggling a golf ball or tennis ball on the stick to improve that. Or if you've got a wall/garage door, play "tennis" with a tennis ball and hockey stick, that would help as well.

The Brett Hull shooting DVD I have says to not try and redirect the puck so much as just get a little piece of it. Hit it too hard and the puck will veer wide of the net, but just making contact a bit will change the angle on the goalie.

I don't screen the goalie much (I hope not...I'm a defenseman), but the coaches I've worked with said to not be right on the goalie, but to get out a few feet in front. He can look around you if you're right on him, but out in front he can't move you or anything.
+1. I use a smarthockey ball. Sometimes guys make fun of me for doing it because "Stupid little tricks aren't worth practicing" but it's rather difficult to pass a puck through me. I knock down more pucks than anyone I know, I'm actually surprised if I miss two in a row.

When you start getting your stick on them regularly you then can work on where you're deflecting them or if you're just knocking them down.

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Old
04-22-2010, 09:51 PM
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if you are unselfish, then camp in front of the net and just try to block the goalie's view of the puck. many times a goalie will let in goals just since he can't react in time or see the shot at all.

as for the hand-eye coordination, practice with a street ball and bounce it off your stick a few times. after you get the hang of that, try to slap the ball with your blade and redirect it. if you get good at hitting the ball in mid air, it will help you in redirecting the puck when it is in mid air

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04-23-2010, 09:14 PM
  #20
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Anyone who says its all luck is full of it, having good hand eye skill is huge, someone mentioned baseball, it really helped me

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Old
04-23-2010, 10:46 PM
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Heat McManus
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One thing to add. Something that helps me is actually pushing the blade of the stick out. Basically instead of trying to pull the puck into the net quickly, you're pushing the blade, increasing the spin of the shot.

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Old
04-24-2010, 12:17 AM
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heat McManus View Post
One thing to add. Something that helps me is actually pushing the blade of the stick out. Basically instead of trying to pull the puck into the net quickly, you're pushing the blade, increasing the spin of the shot.
I'm not exactly sure what you mean by that... but if you have a shot at getting your blade on it, obviously it's easier to hit but you also need to move the blade(by rotating your wrists and/or a shoveling motion) to help it keep momentum. Also, it helps put the puck where you want it, in the general direction. If you just leave your blade flat, it will almost always just knock the puck down.

The use of the blade to redirect pucks is vastly improved by juggling a ball on your stick(BTW, I prefer a smarthockey ball). I like to bounce it up a few times then I'll start catching the ball on the blade. It helps you learn your stick and pattern better, you know where the curve is, where it opens up, where it's flat, etc... This is extremely helpful when redirecting low or wide shots because you know how to place your blade to redirect it where you want instead of stopping it or deflecting it too high or wide(well, at least improving your chances). Also, you get used to where your blade and shaft are in relation to your top hand, since that never changes. After a while, it becomes second nature.

It really is the most fun way to develop soft hands which helps with receiving hard passes, which is something everyone needs to be able to do.

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Old
04-24-2010, 02:45 AM
  #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Salzig View Post
I think it's all about body position and hand-eye coordination.
I think that's 95% of it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Hand eye is huge...one thing you can do is try juggling a golf ball or tennis ball on the stick to improve that. Or if you've got a wall/garage door, play "tennis" with a tennis ball and hockey stick, that would help as well.

The Brett Hull shooting DVD I have says to not try and redirect the puck so much as just get a little piece of it. Hit it too hard and the puck will veer wide of the net, but just making contact a bit will change the angle on the goalie.

I don't screen the goalie much (I hope not...I'm a defenseman), but the coaches I've worked with said to not be right on the goalie, but to get out a few feet in front. He can look around you if you're right on him, but out in front he can't move you or anything.
Very good advice.

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04-24-2010, 06:24 AM
  #24
Nostradanglus
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Hey,

This may have already been said in previous posts I haven't been able to read; But I find the most important part of getting tip-ins (especially in competitive games) is making sure that you have good body position relative to the defenceman who will be making your life difficult in front of the net. They will be shoving you hard/ tying up your stick very erratically, hoping to put you off of doing anything once the shot from the point is on its way.

So, the most important thing to learn is to keep very low. Bend your knees, spread your skates to shoulder width(or even a little wider) and keep your stick directly in front of you facing the point. If the puck moves to the other defenceman, see if you can move laterally to make sure you stay in between the goalie and the puck. If the defenceman is in the way, take his balance by sliding lower than them. If they are too big to move, try to get position further out from the net in front of their D and the goalie. To practice this, make sure you tell your D friends at pickup to be rough with you in front of the net, and whenever you get a shove, make sure you keep your center of gravity by pushing it further down (bend your knees more/use your skates to stop the movement).

If you have good position and a good center of gravity, you have earned yourself an opportunity to tip that puck once your defenceman at the point stops messing around and fires at the net. Remember, your stick should be directly in front of you. Once you see which relative direction the shot is taking, start visually tracing its path with your stick. At your level, it is probably more important to practice touching the puck in motion than being able to accurately direct it where you want it to go on the net. A way to practice this off the ice is by having a friend throw something like tennis balls at you (it would be a good idea to keep your helmet on. Maybe even your jockstrap if you friend is a ***** ). With every throw, just make sure you have a fluid motion tracing the ball from its starting position to where you perceive it will be once it gets into the field of your stick. Start slow, then speed up the throws.

Once you feel comfortable with the important aspect of visualizing and tracing the path of the puck, start playing around with with rolling your wrists to determine where you want the deflection to be directed towards. If it is coming flat on the ice, open your wrists up to decrease the loft of the deflection. If its in the air, close your wrists to push the puck down towards the ice faster. In both cases, make sure the grip you have on your stick is strong enough to withstand the impact of the puck on your stick and of the opposition trying to check your stick away.

If you feel it is more important to clear a path for the shot to go directly in, don't worry about deflecting the shot at all. Keep low and drive with your legs laterally to push the opposing D out of the way. You can even use your elbow to wave in front of where you think the goalie may be looking to make it more difficult for him to pick up the incoming puck. Saying all this, make sure that you never turn around. All of your padding is on your front, and a slapper onto the side/back of your arm/leg/back/neck can be a bit of a downer.

On that note, it is very important to maintain confidence when you are in front of the net trying to deflect an incoming shot. You must be willing to take a little bit of pain if things don't go your way and the puck ends up hitting you in the chest. Being in front of a potential slapshot and being shoved off balance by an opposing D is a high-stakes, exhilarating position to be in. You're basically trying to catch lightning, and there will be times where you get zapped. On the other hand, there will be times when you own that defenceman who is struggling frantically trying to push you out of his zone, and you get all of that puck and score in a net that you aren't even looking at. High-stakes/High-reward. Focus on the latter, especially after experiencing an episode of the former. Relish in the one-on-one challenge that this situation puts you in, get better at it and before you know it your d-men will recognize when its your shift in front of the net and will work that bit harder trying to get that puck through, knowing that having you in front of the net just raises the scoring percentage that little bit more.

In pick-up, the amount of time you spend being able to work on this skill is very, very limited. You can always try to stand in front of the net, but in my experience it is very rare for forwards to even pass the puck to the point, and even rarer for a defenceman to load up on that shot and get an accurate one on net when you are set up. For this reason, I would recommend getting your buds to give you a couple hard slapshots before the pickup starts in earnest. The off-ice training will make it that little bit easier too once you get that ice-time.

Ramble ramble ramble. Good luck! Catch that lightning!

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Old
04-25-2010, 12:27 AM
  #25
Hockeyfan68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WORDMARK View Post
Hey,

This may have already been said in previous posts I haven't been able to read; But I find the most important part of getting tip-ins (especially in competitive games) is making sure that you have good body position relative to the defenceman who will be making your life difficult in front of the net. They will be shoving you hard/ tying up your stick very erratically, hoping to put you off of doing anything once the shot from the point is on its way.

So, the most important thing to learn is to keep very low. Bend your knees, spread your skates to shoulder width(or even a little wider) and keep your stick directly in front of you facing the point. If the puck moves to the other defenceman, see if you can move laterally to make sure you stay in between the goalie and the puck. If the defenceman is in the way, take his balance by sliding lower than them. If they are too big to move, try to get position further out from the net in front of their D and the goalie. To practice this, make sure you tell your D friends at pickup to be rough with you in front of the net, and whenever you get a shove, make sure you keep your center of gravity by pushing it further down (bend your knees more/use your skates to stop the movement).

If you have good position and a good center of gravity, you have earned yourself an opportunity to tip that puck once your defenceman at the point stops messing around and fires at the net. Remember, your stick should be directly in front of you. Once you see which relative direction the shot is taking, start visually tracing its path with your stick. At your level, it is probably more important to practice touching the puck in motion than being able to accurately direct it where you want it to go on the net. A way to practice this off the ice is by having a friend throw something like tennis balls at you (it would be a good idea to keep your helmet on. Maybe even your jockstrap if you friend is a ***** ). With every throw, just make sure you have a fluid motion tracing the ball from its starting position to where you perceive it will be once it gets into the field of your stick. Start slow, then speed up the throws.

Once you feel comfortable with the important aspect of visualizing and tracing the path of the puck, start playing around with with rolling your wrists to determine where you want the deflection to be directed towards. If it is coming flat on the ice, open your wrists up to decrease the loft of the deflection. If its in the air, close your wrists to push the puck down towards the ice faster. In both cases, make sure the grip you have on your stick is strong enough to withstand the impact of the puck on your stick and of the opposition trying to check your stick away.

If you feel it is more important to clear a path for the shot to go directly in, don't worry about deflecting the shot at all. Keep low and drive with your legs laterally to push the opposing D out of the way. You can even use your elbow to wave in front of where you think the goalie may be looking to make it more difficult for him to pick up the incoming puck. Saying all this, make sure that you never turn around. All of your padding is on your front, and a slapper onto the side/back of your arm/leg/back/neck can be a bit of a downer.

On that note, it is very important to maintain confidence when you are in front of the net trying to deflect an incoming shot. You must be willing to take a little bit of pain if things don't go your way and the puck ends up hitting you in the chest. Being in front of a potential slapshot and being shoved off balance by an opposing D is a high-stakes, exhilarating position to be in. You're basically trying to catch lightning, and there will be times where you get zapped. On the other hand, there will be times when you own that defenceman who is struggling frantically trying to push you out of his zone, and you get all of that puck and score in a net that you aren't even looking at. High-stakes/High-reward. Focus on the latter, especially after experiencing an episode of the former. Relish in the one-on-one challenge that this situation puts you in, get better at it and before you know it your d-men will recognize when its your shift in front of the net and will work that bit harder trying to get that puck through, knowing that having you in front of the net just raises the scoring percentage that little bit more.

In pick-up, the amount of time you spend being able to work on this skill is very, very limited. You can always try to stand in front of the net, but in my experience it is very rare for forwards to even pass the puck to the point, and even rarer for a defenceman to load up on that shot and get an accurate one on net when you are set up. For this reason, I would recommend getting your buds to give you a couple hard slapshots before the pickup starts in earnest. The off-ice training will make it that little bit easier too once you get that ice-time.

Ramble ramble ramble. Good luck! Catch that lightning!
Nice, you're a frickin' windbag like me!

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