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Question about baking roller hockey skates

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04-23-2010, 10:01 PM
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Doug19
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Question about baking roller hockey skates

Okay, so I just bought my first pair of hockey roller skates last week they are the Bauer RX:15 skates. They fit very well as far as length and width go, but the problem seems to lie in the ankle area. These things are really killing the sides and the front of my ankle so much that I was wondering if these skates were safe to bake in an oven at home like internet directions say for home baking. I read the instructions but there was no mention of baking so I don't really want to ruin a $150 pair of skates a week after I bought them. Thanks in advance for any help guys.

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04-23-2010, 10:44 PM
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Heat McManus
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They are theoretically bakeable, but I don't recommend baking them. The padding inside the RX15 is not thermoformable. You're just going to break down the boot quicker. Also, I would never, ever, ever, ever, ever bake skates in your home.

Better thing to do would be take them to a hockey shop and have them punch out the bothersome areas.

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04-24-2010, 01:56 PM
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TinofGrizz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heat McManus View Post
They are theoretically bakeable, but I don't recommend baking them. The padding inside the RX15 is not thermoformable. You're just going to break down the boot quicker. Also, I would never, ever, ever, ever, ever bake skates in your home.

Better thing to do would be take them to a hockey shop and have them punch out the bothersome areas.
Agree on all accounts. It's Pointless to bake a price point skate.

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04-24-2010, 06:09 PM
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Gino 14
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I've baked roller hockey and ice hockey skates at home and never had an issue. You're not baking them at a temp high enough to do any damage to the skates, you're not even at the boiling point of water. People who tell you not to bake them at home have more money than sense. I have kids and wouldn't do anything to damage their skates but I have done many pairs and never had a single issue or skate failure.

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04-24-2010, 07:31 PM
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Heat McManus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gino 14 View Post
I've baked roller hockey and ice hockey skates at home and never had an issue. You're not baking them at a temp high enough to do any damage to the skates, you're not even at the boiling point of water. People who tell you not to bake them at home have more money than sense. I have kids and wouldn't do anything to damage their skates but I have done many pairs and never had a single issue or skate failure.
The one time something does go wrong you are voiding the warranty.

I don't see how telling somebody not to pay $20-40 dollars equates to having more money than sense. Or that if you do it wrong and the skates are burned you've wasted $150.

It could be the holder melting or the eyelets ripping because you're pulling at the wrong angle. Lots of variables. Also, wiith this model skate, there's no advantage of baking the skate. There's no material that is thermoformable. We're not talking about a One95 or similar skate that is manufactured with the intent that it will be baked.

You might have not had any issues, but I've seen MANY people who have. And we tell them there's nothing we can do because they've voided their warranty.

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04-25-2010, 05:42 AM
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Gino 14
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Originally Posted by Heat McManus View Post
The one time something does go wrong you are voiding the warranty.

I don't see how telling somebody not to pay $20-40 dollars equates to having more money than sense. Or that if you do it wrong and the skates are burned you've wasted $150.

It could be the holder melting or the eyelets ripping because you're pulling at the wrong angle. Lots of variables. Also, wiith this model skate, there's no advantage of baking the skate. There's no material that is thermoformable. We're not talking about a One95 or similar skate that is manufactured with the intent that it will be baked.

You might have not had any issues, but I've seen MANY people who have. And we tell them there's nothing we can do because they've voided their warranty.
Big difference between doing it wrong and not having problems when it's done right. The fact is, baking can be done in a home oven with good results.

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04-25-2010, 05:49 AM
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Gino 14
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Originally Posted by Heat McManus View Post
. Also, wiith this model skate, there's no advantage of baking the skate. There's no material that is thermoformable. We're not talking about a One95 or similar skate that is manufactured with the intent that it will be baked.

You might have not had any issues, but I've seen MANY people who have. And we tell them there's nothing we can do because they've voided their warranty.
Yes, they can be baked

Under the features tab.

Guess you're not the expert you claim to be and why I'll save my $20 - $40 and do it myself.

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04-25-2010, 09:16 AM
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LarryO
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Originally Posted by Gino 14 View Post
Yes, they can be baked

Under the features tab.

Guess you're not the expert you claim to be and why I'll save my $20 - $40 and do it myself.
I wouldn't wager my life savings on the accuracy of the specs displayed on Total Hockey's site. On Inline Warehouse, only the RX-25 and up mention being thermoformable. I would only believe the Bauer website or catalogue, and neither mentions being thermoformable for the roller hockey skates. For the ice skates, only the Vapour X-40 and above state being thermoformable but the boots aren't the same. Maybe you should try contacting Bauer to find out before baking them, because if they aren't meant to be baked, you will gain no benefit and you will risk premature breakdown.

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04-25-2010, 10:59 AM
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Heat McManus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gino 14 View Post
Yes, they can be baked

Under the features tab.

Guess you're not the expert you claim to be and why I'll save my $20 - $40 and do it myself.
I never said you cannot bake these skates. Did you actually read either of my posts? I said there's not much of an advantage to doing so. They're "heat moldable" in that they are able to be baked, but there's not thermoformable material in the ankles and other areas like higher end skates. You're basically just warming the skate up and making it malleable. Pretty much any skate can be baked, but not all skates need to be.

I didn't say you couldn't do it at home. You can do many things at home. Plumbing, electrical work, simple surgery. But something I don't recommend doing at home because if something goes wrong the risk might not be worth it.

You do know that now if ANYTHING goes wrong with your skate, the manufacturer doesn't have to do anything. Regardless of whether it has to do with baking or not. Broken chassis? You baked it yourself, warranty void. Wheels splitting? Warranty void.

If you want to bake them at home and save money, go for it. BUT you are also voiding your warranty. And if you buy them from a shop this isn't even an issue because it should be free.


----------------------------------------------------

To reiterate my point to the OP. It sounds like your problems might be better solved by having the areas punched out. Basically the skate is put on a rack and the padding is compressed and area is added at the troublesome area. Should cost about $5.
If the pain is directly at the front of your ankle it might be lace-bite. This can be alleviated by doing a few things. Try a different lacing pattern. Or you can buy something like this:
http://www.goal-line-golf.com/figure...prod_3338.html
Sell a lot of these to hockey players. Used them myself. They work well.

I've also seen guys take their skates to cobblers who have a lot more tools to augment the tongue. They can add foams, felts, pads, etc. I'd try lacing then whatever is going to be least expensive.

Cheers.


Last edited by Heat McManus: 04-25-2010 at 11:08 AM.
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